David Rosenberg

Rosenberg's Explanation For Recent Market Surge: Liquidity Pump And Short Covering

It seems everyone is perplexed by the most recent irrational bout of July market action. Like clockwork, once July rolls in, the market surges, no questions asked. This year, the ramp is particularly blatant because as the attached chart demonstrates, bonds, which are a far more credible barometer of market (in)sanity, indicate the S&P is rich by at about 50 points. As this spread will most certainly converge eventually as we discussed previously, a short stock, short bond position would generate some much needed P&L in this world of deranged fractal algorithms. As to what may have caused the most recent bout of irrational exuberance, David Rosenberg has the most logical, and generic solution: excess liquidity and a short covering spree, and "nothing fundamental here."

Stocks Expected To See 12% Increase In Revenues In Q2, 41% Increase In EPS, And A Summary Outlook From Rosenberg

With the imminent launch of the Q2 earnings season, below is a summary of consensus for year-over-year top and bottom line performance. In summary, the outlook is for a 12% pick up in top line YoY (ex fins), and pretty much staying flat at that level of outperformance for the next 2 quarters, and for a 41% rise in EPS compared to Q2 of 2009 per Bloomberg consensus estimates. For those looking for further granularity, David Rosenberg presents a detailed break down sector by sector, and warns of the risks to betting it all on the earnings parade, even as analysts are once again at near all time record bullishness on stocks.As a reminder, the consensus view is for a 2010 absolute EPS of 82, and for a simply ridiculous all time record 96 in 2011, higher than the 88 seen all the all time high three years ago, when the economy had the benefit of a multi-trillion shadow credit system. Who knows, maybe the Fed can take over that full responsibility as well.

Guest Post: EXTEND & PRETEND: Stage I Comes to an End! The Dog Ate my Report Card

Both came to an end at the same time: the administration’s policy to Extend & Pretend has run out of time as has the patience of the US electorate with the government’s Keynesian economic policy responses. Desperate last gasp attempts are to be fully expected, but any chance of success is rapidly diminishing. Whether an unimpressed and insufficiently loyal army general, a fleeing cabinet budget chief or G20 peers going the austerity route, all are non-confidence votes for the Obama administration’s present policies. A day after the courts slapped down President Obama’s six month gulf drilling moratorium, the markets were unpatriotically signaling a classic head and shoulders topping pattern. With an employment rebound still a non-starter, President Obama as expected was found to be asking for yet another $50B in unemployment extensions and state budget assistance to avoid teacher layoffs. However, the gig is up: the policy of Extend and Pretend has no time left on the shot clock nor for another round of unemployment benefit extensions. A congress that is now clearly frightened of what it sees looming in the fall midterm elections is running for cover on any further spending initiatives. The US electorate has been sending an unmistakable message in all elections nationwide. White House policies are unmistakably in shambles. We are rudderless with terribly outdated Keynesian zealots at the helm as the storm continues to worsen. Stage I of Extend & Pretend is over – RIP!

Econophile's picture

It's hard to ignore the data that is coming out. There is a definite slowing trend in the economy. It supports my forecasts of a slowdown coming in the second half of this year. Expect the data to be its normal uneven trend, but it is clear that the economy is slowing. Here I show you what I'm seeing.

Bob Janjuah Leaves RBS

One of the world's last few remaining permaskeptics, Bob Janjuah, has severed ties with the UK's most bailed out and nationalized bank, RBS, reports Bloomberg. And just as the departure of David Rosenberg from Merrill in early 2009 marked the start of a period of complete market schizophrenia, we hope that the purging of negativists from the Royal Bank of Scotland is not indicative of just such another period, at least on the other side of the Atlantic. However, unlike last March when the several trillion in global stimulus funds was only just entering the economy, this time around not even the ritualistic sacrifice of bears will do much to stop the slide. And just to confirm that this is likely a localized issue to RBS, the Chief Markets Econoist Kevin Gaynor has also left the firm.

ECRI Leading Economic Index Plunges At -6.9% Rate, Back To December 2007 Levels When Recession Officially Started

It's getting close: the fabled -10% annualized change (see David Rosenberg) which guarantees a recession is now just 3.1% away, which at this rate of collapse will be breached in two weeks. The ECRI is now at December 2007 levels, the time when the last recession officially started. The index dropped from an annualized revised -5.8% (previously -5.7%) to -6.9%. As a reminder, from Rosie, "It is one thing to slip to or fractionally below the zero line, but a -3.5% reading has only sent off two head-fakes in the past, while accurately foreshadowing seven recessions — with a three month lag. Keep your eye on the -10 threshold, for at that level, the economy has gone into recession … only 100% of the time (42 years of data)." We are practically there.

China's Trade Balance By Country, And Why The FX Action Is Less Of A Deal Than The Media Will Have You Believe

As every kitchen sink appears to have a definitive opinion on the impact on the CNY rebalance, we would like to step back for a second and present a historical chart of the country's trade balances not only in total, but by individual country. As the chart shows, and as David Rosenberg also highlights, providing a blanket summary as to the impact of a CNY revaluation is a rather foolhardy thing: while China may enjoy a positive trade surplus with the US and EU, it certainly has a trade deficit with some other key producer countries, namely Korea ($61 billion LTM), Japan ($47 billion), Taiwan ($79 billion), and Australia ($27 billion). So while it could be argued that the US and EU's manufacturing sectors benefit from a stronger Yuan, what happens to the exports of the traditional Chinese partners? Absent the PBoC going full tilt and scaling up its imports across the board, there will be some very unhappy traditional Chinese trade counterparts. Although in this age, when even presumably smart economists beckon to "Spend now, save tomorrow", why bother with something as simple as the Capital to Current account equality. China should buy up everything, and use reverse money or something to then reinvest the reverse proceeds from all the exports into sovereign bonds... or something.

Don Coxe Dissects Gold, As "The Oldest-Established Store Of Value Moves To Center Stage"

Don Coxe of Coxe Advisors is out with his latest monthly newsletter, a must read report on why the Loonie may be a better investment than both the CNY and the USD combined, why investors should beware of Greeks baring facts, the BP disaster, and, most importantly, quotes Browning, in an extensive analysis of gold: "Leave the fire ashes. What survives is gold."

ECRI Index Continues To Plunge, Drops By 2.2 To -5.7, And Just 4.3 Away From "Guaranteed" Double Dip Territory

The ECRI weekly leading index is continuing its accelerating dive, and is now well into negative territory, hitting -5.7 for the past week: a 2.2 decline from the prior week. Here is why, as David Rosenberg, this is a critical indicator, and why we may have just 4.3 more points to go before the critical -10 threshold: "It is one thing to slip to or fractionally below the zero line, but a -3.5% reading has only sent off two head-fakes in the past, while accurately foreshadowing seven recessions — with a three month lag. Keep your eye on the -10 threshold, for at that level, the economy has gone into recession … only 100% of the time (42 years of data)." At this rate of decline -10 will be taken out in the first week of July.

Low Volumy, With An 80% Probability Of A Double Dip

Last week, we pointed out that the ECRI Leading Index dipped to negative for the first time in over a year, which on a historical basis tends to predict a recession with surprising regularity. Today, David Rosenberg takes this data and expands on his views of the probability of a double dip.An interesting observation: when the ECRI drops to -10 (from the current -3.5, and plunging at the fastest rate in history), the economy has gone into a recession 100% of the time, based on 42 years of data. At the current rate of collapse, this means in two months we should know with certainty if the double dip has now arrived.

Is The Market Correction Over?

Now that the market has decisively entered into correction territory, two of the most bullish investment banks around, Goldman and Deutsche Bank, are long overdue for reports that describe just how this event was dully expected and in fact, priced in, and that investors should in now way draw and conclusions about a potential recession emerging from something as innocuous as a recession. Furthermore, the 10%+ pullback is "perfectly normal", and has no impact on either Goldman's 1,250 or DB's 1,375 end of year target for the S&P. And yet, there is a 'but' - both firms now sound far less confident than they did a few short months ago, and the hedging of year end targets has begun (more so at GS than DB). And while Goldman's report is more focused on the European context, and is thus appreciably more bearish, Goldman's tone is far more subdued than Deutsche's, which is understandable: with assets at two thirds of German GDP, and with a government dead set on minimizing bank bailouts for the foreseeable future, the German bank has far less margin for reality than the primary recipient of Hank Paulson's bailout generosity.

Perspectives On Gold Demand

In today's letter, David Rosenberg, among other things, answers the question of where demand for gold is coming from. For many this is rhetorical: a mere glance at ETF gold accumulation, and PHYS' recent follow-on are sufficient. Today, GLD alone bought 8 tons of gold to hit a new all time record of 1,306 tonnes. Yet for some, like the author of the WSJ's ongoing hit piece on gold, this is not sufficient, so here is Rosie, patiently explaining to the cheap seats, that even at record prices, demand for gold is not going away.

Bearish Trio Complete: Albert Edwards Chimes In: "We Have Not Seen The Worst Yet"

First confirmed permabull Jim O'Neill presented 10 "grizzles" why the bear market may be coming back, then Bob Janjuah reiterated his very bearish outlook on life, and, right on cue, here is Albert Edwards with his latest crucifixion of unwarranted bullish sentiment."As we head into a double-dip, the current technical correction will rapidly turn into a resumption of the structural bear market for stocks. We have not seen the worst yet." Perhaps BMO's recommendation for a zero equity weighting is spot on...