Bill Gross

Fischer Admits Fed Is Clueless About What Happens Next

"There is quite significant uncertainty about what's actually going to happen, I don’t think anyone quite knows what’s going to come out of the process which involves both the administration and Congress in the deciding of fiscal policy and a variety of other things."

Weekend Reading: Fed Up

"The important point to note here is the historical deviation between exuberance and economic realities has generally NOT been resolved by reality catching up with fantasy. It has always been the other way around."

Seth Klarman Warns Trump's "Erratic, Overconfidence" Could End Dollar Hegemony

The big picture for investors is this: Trump is high volatility, and investors generally abhor volatility and shun uncertainty... If things go wrong, we could find ourselves at the beginning of a lengthy decline in dollar hegemony, a rapid rise in interest rates and inflation, and global angst...”

Mario Draghi Hints Trump Will Be Responsible For The Next Financial Crisis

According to Mario Draghi, portfolio manager of the world's biggest hedge fund, it is not his gargantuan balance sheet equal to 36% of the eurozone GDP, nor the $14 trillion in global central bank liquifity that will be responsible for the next market crash, but that Donald Trump's deregulation of the banking industry has "sown the seeds of the next financial crisis."

Gross: "Without QE From ECB And BOJ, The U.S. Economy Would Sink Into Recession"

"The ECB and BOJ are buying $150 billion a month of their own bonds and much of that money then flows from 10 basis points JGB's and 45 basis point Bunds into 2.45% U.S. Treasuries.... I would venture a guess that without QE from the ECB and BOJ that 10-year U.S. Treasuries would rather quickly rise to 3.5% and the U.S. economy would sink into recession."

Wall Street Responds To Today's Jobs Report

Following today's jobs report, the market's reaction to the unexpectedly strong January payrolls visualized in the charts below, is straightforward: the disappointing wage growth is an indication that the Fed may not hike rates for quite a bit longer than expected, and will likely will be forced to reduce its rate hike expectations from 3 to 2 (in line with the market) or fewer if wage growth continue to stagnate.

Weekend Reading: Anticipation

“Stock market bubbles don’t appear out of thin air. They have a basis in reality. But that reality is distorted by misconception..

Guggenheim: "3% Is The Beginning Of The End"

"3% is basically the beginning of the end... as the business cycle ages, in 2019, 2020 when we could anticipate we might have another recession, that there will be another deflationary burst that will bring rates back down if we do get above 3%, but we haven't violated that trend yet."