PIMCO

Frontrunning: October 9

  • Global stocks eye biggest rally in four years on Fed relief (Reuters)
  • FOMC Minutes Sap Confidence in Fed's 2015 Rate Hike Resolve (BBG)
  • Glencore to cut annual zinc production by a third (FT)
  • Tea Party wave that lifted Republicans threatens to engulf them (Reuters)
  • Why Kevin McCarthy Came to Quit Speaker Race (WSJ)
  • A U.S. Recession Just Got a Little More Likely (BBG)

Biggest Weekly Stock Rally Since 2012 Continues Driven By Tumbling Dollar, Dovish Fed; Commodities Surge

The global risk on mood (which is really anything but, and is merely an unprecedented short covering squeeze as we will report momentarily) launched by an abysmal jobs report one week ago and "validated" yesterday by the surprisingly dovish FOMC minutes, which said nothing new but merely confirmed what most knew, namely that a rate hike is almost certain to not occur until mid-2016 if ever, and accelerated by a Fed-driven collapse in the dollar which overnight has led to a historic 3.4% move in the Indonesian Rupiah the most since 2008, has pushed global stocks even higher in their biggest weekly rally since 2012, despite the start of an earnings season where virtually every single company reporting so far has stumbled on earnings reports that were far worse than even gloomy consensus had expected.

Liquid Alts - The World's Most Popular Hedge Fund Strategy Explained

Today's most popular hedge fund strategy among institutional investors globally is "Alternative Global Macro Funds". Also known as a “go anywhere” investment style, active managers employ opportunistic trading tactics across asset classes, financial instruments, and geographic regions. Like many liquid alts, global macro funds grew rapidly following the financial crisis as investors looked for strategies that could diversify their portfolios in the midst of volatility in the global marketplace and historically high sector correlations against the S&P 500, thereby improving their risk-return profiles. Ultimately, success in this classification resides in selecting the right active manager given the strategy’s wide dispersion of returns.

The Worst Part Is Central Bankers Know Exactly What They Are Doing

The best position for a tyrant or tyrants to be in, at least while consolidating power, is tyranny by proxy. That is to say, the most dangerous tyrants are those the people do not recognize: the tyrants who hide behind scarecrows and puppets and faceless organizations. The worst position for the common citizen to be in is a false sense of security and understanding, operating on the assumption that tyrants do not exist or that potential tyrants are really just greedy fools acting independently from one another. Being the clever tyrants that they are, the members of the central banking cult hope you are too stupid or too biased to grasp the concept of conspiracy. If you cannot identify the agenda, you can do nothing to interfere with the agenda.

PIMCO's Balls On The Fed: There Will Be No Escape From ZIRP

"There is a chance that the Fed, like a number of central banks in recent years, may find it impossible to escape the effective lower bound to which policy rates were cut during the dark days of the crisis some seven years ago."

The Complete FOMC Cheat Sheet: All You Need To Know

The data, according to many analysts, have been broadly supportive, with stronger growth and a tightening in the labor market that should allow the Fed to be "reasonably confident" that inflation will gradually return to target. That said, heightened global risks could lead to a tactical delay. Economisseds remain evenly split on the prospect of the first rate increase in 9 years.

This Is Another "Subprime" Waiting To Blow

The 2008 global financial crisis was centered on mortgage debt. There was too much of it that couldn’t be repaid. When the value of the collateral – homes – headed down, the bubble popped. Today, consumers have about the same amount of debt. But now the excesses are in auto loans and student debt... and again, the collateral is falling in value.

Frontrunning: September 4

  • Jobs Report Could Seal the Deal on Rates (WSJ)
  • The Jobs Report and the August Curse: Jobs Day Guide (BBG)
  • Migrants hold out on Hungarian 'freedom train'; Orban says millions coming (Reuters)
  • Migrant Crisis Divides Europe (WSJ)
  • German industry orders fall in July on weak foreign demand (Reuters)
  • Alibaba’s Jack Ma, Joe Tsai to Borrow $2 Billion Against Shares (WSJ)
  • U.K. Retailers Post Worst Sales Decline Since Financial Crisis (BBG)

"They'll Blame Physical Gold Holders For The Failure Of Monetary Policies" Marc Faber Explains Everything

"The future is unknown and we are not dealing with markets that are free markets anymore...now we have government interventions everywhere. [But] in the last say twelve months, I have observed an increasing number of academics who are questioning monetary policies. That's why I think they will take the gold away and go back to some gold standard by revaluing the gold say from now $1000/oz to say $10,000 dollars. An individual should definitely own some physical gold. The bigger question is where should he store it? because... the failure of monetary policies will not be admitted by the professors that are at central banks, they will then go and blame someone else for it and then an easy target would be to blame it on people that own physical gold because - they can argue - well these are the ones that do take money out of circulation and then the velocity of money goes down - we have to take it away from them... That has happened in 1933 in the US."

Frontrunning: August 7

  • July job gains may favor September interest rate rise (Reuters)
  • It's all about Trump at raucous Republican debate (Reuters)
  • The 5 Most Important Takeaways From the First Debate of 2016 (BBG)
  • Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina wins the Web (Reuters)
  • Hedge Fund Losses From Commodity Slump Sparking Investor Exodus (BBG)
  • Winners and losers from the first Republican presidential debate (WaPo)
  • Bush turns in workmanlike debate performance, but will it be enough? (Reuters)