Goldman Sachs

Reggie Middleton's picture

How Inferior American Education Caused The Credit/Real Estate/Sovereign Debt Bubbles & Why It's Preventing True Recovery Pt 2

Ask many people lower on the socio-economic ladder what money is for, you frequently get in response “to buy things” -a mentality leading a circular lack of understanding -leading to a lack of money itself. Capital - or more simply, money - is a proxy for labor.

Tyler Durden's picture

A Couple Of Questions To Start The Day

Money continues to come into the market based on “decoupling” and the “muddle through” scenario. I do not believe that “muddle through” is an option. The entire system in Europe has become so interconnected that “muddling through” doesn’t seem realistic. The situation in Italy remains bleak (bond yields are higher again in spite of massive amounts of central bank support). The situation in Greece is reaching a peak. A voluntary resolution seems less likely by the day, but that leaves open the ECB’s positions, and also opens up the question of what to do with all the Greek Government Guaranteed Bank Bonds (affectionately known as ponzi bonds) that the ECB is financing to keep Greek banks alive? The ECB will have to change their rules yet again to let formerly guaranteed debt still be pledged as collateral? I think that issue is just as important as the CDS settlements and changes in collateral requirements that are likely to result from a Greek default.

Reggie Middleton's picture

How Inferior American Education Caused Credit/Real Estate/Sovereign Debt Bubbles & Why It's Preventing True Recovery, Part 1

The circle remained exclusive because real influence, for Mills, was located not in individuals (where it should be for that would release true creative and productive energies from said individual into greater society), but in their access to the “command of major institutions…the necessary bases of power, of wealth, and of prestige.”

Tyler Durden's picture

40 Wall Street: John Corzine's Latest Office Space?

While nearly three months after the MF Global bankruptcy nobody still has any idea where the billion + in commingled client money has gone, nor why Corzine is still out and about walking freely, the former CEO of both Goldman, MF Global and New Jersey is rumored to be looking for office space at 40 Wall. Reports the WSJ: " Jon S. Corzine, who resigned as chief executive of MF Global Holdings Ltd. shortly after the securities firm collapsed in October, recently has been looking for office space in Manhattan, according to people familiar with the situation. One of the locations he seems interested in: brokerage firm John Carris Investments, at 40 Wall St., around the corner from the New York Stock Exchange, these people said. Employees at the small firm have been told that the former Goldman Sachs Group Inc. chairman and New Jersey governor might drop by, one person familiar with the situation said." Ostensibly, the space would be in the form of a sublet from John Carris. Which is great: finally all those thousands of people who still have no recourse to their cash will know precisely where to find Jon and express their gratitude and his pillaging of their investments in a failed attempt to cover up his stupidity.

4closureFraud's picture

Master of Horror, Poe, Revisited | The Brazen

Thrust upon a middle class bleary, they were plundered, while weak and weary, Over many a tainted and spurious document came a forger’s reward.

Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Has Italy Gone Fascist?

Events in Italy must be watched closely. The country that gifted Fascism to the world in the 1930s was widely admired even by FDR, who held Mussolini in high regard and was no doubt inspired in many of his own policy choices. Will Italy lead the way once more, as politicians in Europe and the US watch to see what oppressive policies they may get away with? And while Russell Napier (correctly) foresees capital controls being imposed and suggested that one parks his cash in Singapore dollars, Italians may want to get themselves out as well before the current group of Professors slams the gates shut. Things are moving even faster than one of the world’s leading financial historians could foresee.

Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: January 6

  • Markets await US Non-Farm Payrolls data, released 1330GMT
  • UniCredit experiences another disrupted trading session, trades down 11%, then returns to almost unchanged
  • Iran causes further unease with plans to engage in wargame exercises in the Strait of Hormuz
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman Remains Cautious On Europe As Negative Feedback Accelerates

As seems obvious from the market's reaction over the last week, European problems are not solved by short-term liquidity band-aids. In fact, as Goldman notes this week, the same economic and political risks remain even if some funding relief has been put in place. With sovereigns and financials leading one another to new lows since the LTRO, the negative feedback loops remain in full force. Given the difficulties on the road ahead – and significant ongoing differences across governments on how to resolve them – the risk of political miscalculation or errors is unfortunately still very clear. In the limit, those instabilities could still put the union on a path towards a break-up. Economic weakness in the meantime will intensify the challenges for the weaker sovereigns.

4closureFraud's picture


How many of those millions of dollars in cars does the "Foreclosure King" still have? How is he able to stay so warm and cozy in his castle on the intercoastal in Ft.Lauderdale staring out at his 100 foot yachts and where is the Florida Bar in all this?

Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman On The Five Key Questions For 2012

As US markets remain in hibernation for a few more hours, Goldman picks out the five critical questions that need to be considered in the context of 2012's economic outlook. Jan Hatzius and his team ask and answer a veritable chart-fest of crucial items from whether US growth will pick up to above-trend (and remain 'decoupled' from Europe's downside drag), whether inflation will find its Goldilocks moment this year and if the US housing market will bottom in 2012 (this one is a stretch). Summarizing all of these in a final question, whether the Fed will ease further, the erudite economist continues to expect an expansion of LSAP (focused on Agency MBS) and an official re-adjustment to an inflation targeting environment. Their view remains that a nominal GDP target combined with more (larger) QE improves the chances of the Fed meeting its dual mandates (unemployment target?) over time but expectations for this radical shift remain predicated on considerably worse economic performance in the economy first (as they expect growth to disappoint). We feel the same way (worse is needed) and recall our recent (firstly here, then here and here) focus on the shift in the balance of power between the Fed and ECB balance sheets (forced Fed QE retaliation soon?).

Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman's Jim O'Neill Is Now Officially A Completely Broken Record

How Jim O'Neill still has a job is beyond us. Not only is he the head of the worst performing vertical at Goldman Sachs, not only is he the creator of the Bloody Ridiculous Investment Concept (BRIC), but now this? Come on...

Tyler Durden's picture

Protesters Arrested At Goldman Sachs HQ?

But fear not: the arrested are not the firm's "god's work-ing" employees; more of the OWS persuasion. From PressTV: "US police have arrested 17 members of the Occupy movement in New York as the nationwide crackdown on the anti-corporatism protesters continues." When we get additional confirmation of this arrest from US sources, and not-Iranian media, we will update. Luckily, since none of the protesters can close a Goldman (which is still a Bank Holding Company) checking account, we are confident the story will end here.

Tyler Durden's picture

Solyndra Schadenfreude As Goldman Sachs Played Key Role

While we are not completely shy of saying we-told-you-so, in the case of the players in Solyndra's fantastic rise and fall, we are more than happy to. Back in September we highlighted Goldman Sachs' key role in the financing rounds of the now bankrupt solar company and this evening MarketWatch (and DowJones VentureWire) delves deeper and highlights how the squid has largely stayed out of the headlines (what's the opposite of lime-light?) in this case despite its seemingly critical assistance and support from inception to pre-destruction. Goldman's involvement in Solyndra, and its lofty valuation projections, lent credibility to the company and helped rouse investor interest and it was this private interest that was cited by DoE officials as a considerable factor in its loan guarantee program. As we said before, anywhere you look, Goldman has been there and left its mark...

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