Commercial Real Estate

Tyler Durden's picture

"The Approximate Present Does Not Approximately Determine The Future"





Chaos Theory turns 50 years old this year, celebrating half a century of flapping butterfly wings in Brazil creating tornadoes in Texas.  That most famous example is especially appropriate, since it was a meteorologist named Edward Lorenz who first outlined why seemingly consistent and knowable systems can still go wildly wrong.  As it turns out, as ConvergEx's Nick Colas reminds us, small errors in measurement or observation at the start of a time series can significantly change how things look at the end.  In the current low volatility, one-variable central bank driven global equity markets, Chaos Theory may seem a quaint relic of past crises.  However, its central lesson – that complex interrelated systems create unexpected outcomes from seemingly benign inputs – is still relevant.  Students of economics like to think of their discipline as scientific, just like physics or other hard sciences.  They would do well to embrace the intellectual honesty neatly encapsulated by the central lessons of Chaos Theory. The problem is that current market price action - that slow steady grind higher - indicates marginal buyers don’t fret very much about the future.  No matter how little we really know about it.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 10





  • PBOC Says China Shouldn’t Be ’Blindly Optimistic’ on Inflation (BBG)
  • Foreigners Buying Half of London New Homes Prop Up Building (BBG) - first they come for the foreign deposits, then for the real assets...
  • Investors Rediscovering Margin Debt (WSJ) - well, yes: it is at record highs
  • China issues new rules targeting wealth management fund pools (RTRS)
  • Navy $37 Billion Ships Seen Unsuitable Have 2-Year Window (BBG)
  • New York may have to drop claims against BofA over Merrill (RTRS)
  • FBI Rejects Boston Police Stance in Spat Over Terror Data (BBG)
  • In eastern Syria oil smugglers benefit from chaos (RTRS)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Jim Grant On Gold's Recent Drop: "Confidence In Bernanke Is Utterly Misplaced"





"Inflation is a state of affairs in which there is too much money," Jim Grant notes in this Bloomberg TV interview, however, "It's not too much money chasing too few goods," he corrects the misnomer, "the thing this money chases is variable." Whether it is Iowa farmland, housing, stocks, or bonds, central banks are stuffing us with it. Yes, equities are high, but Grant explains, "beneath the surface of things or not so far beneath the surface of things," it is not at all good, adding that, "Central bank 'original sin'," is akin to Revolutionary France, and he shows no concerns over Gold's recent dip, noting "a general fatigue animus towards gold," that seems predicated on more confidence in central bankers; to Grant, "that confidence is utterly misplaced!"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bright Lights, Big City, Bigger Prices - Where Inflation Hides





Subdued headline inflation hides the inimitable rise of prices across the country; but ConvergEx's Nick Colas examines the pace of inflation in four large cities across the US – Boston, Chicago, New York and San Francisco.  All are home to multitudes of urban working professionals, share the same currency and have similar macro economies, though, Colas notes, the trend of price increases varies considerably (particularly with regards to NYC vs. the rest).  The cost of living is up in all four cities since 2008.  Incomes, too, are generally higher – although not in New York, likely a result of the Big Apple’s unique micro economy. Comparatively, New Yorkers have experienced the steepest price increases in transportation (higher cab and subway fares give this category a boost) and groceries, meanwhile rent, dinners out and cocktails continue to be more and more costly.  So what gives?  Rising inflation despite lower incomes?  The answer lies in the tug of war between less cash pay on Wall Street and a very active foreign investment market that is driving up real estate prices.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Confused By What Is Going On At JCP? Here's The Pro Forma Cap Table And The Cliff Notes





Ever since JCP entered the death watch with its absolutely abysmal 2012 year end results which saw the firm report something like negative $1.5 billion in Free Cash Flow (frankly we stopped counting there), and just ahead of the heavy inventory rebuild season so just as net working capital would demand another billion or so in cash, much has happened at the company.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 8





  • Finally the MSM catches up to reality: Workers Stuck in Disability Stunt Economic Recovery (WSJ)
  • China opens Aussie dollar direct trading (FT)
  • National Bank and Eurobank Fall as Merger Halted (BBG)
  • Why Making Europe German Won’t Fix the Crisis - The Bulgarian case study (BBG)
  • Nikkei hits new highs as yen slides (FT)
  • Housing Prices Are on a Tear, Thanks to the Fed (WSJ)
  • Why is Moody's exempt from justice, or the "Big Question in U.S. vs. S&P" (WSJ)
  • Central banks move into riskier assets (FT)
  • N. Korea May Conduct Joint Missile-Nuclear Tests, South Says (BBG)
  • North Korea Pulls Workers From Factories It Runs With South (NYT)
  • Illinois pension fix faces political, legal hurdles (Reuters)
  • IPO Bankers Become Frogs in Hot Water Amid China Market Halt (BBG)
  • Portugal Seeks New Cuts to Stay on Course (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

They Came, They Saw, They Got The Hell Out Of UBS In 7 Days





Housing is recovering. The Fed has your back. The consumer is healthy. All things that would suggest the commercial-mortgage bond business should be on the cusp of a renaissance. So the question is - what did Brett Ersoff and John Herman see, seven short days after being promoted to run the UBS real-estate finance division, that made them depart the venerable Swiss firm with the paintball sized Stamford trading floor?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: 'Available'





It is clear now that we must have been wrong about the economy. No more proof is needed than the fact the Dow has gone up 1,500 points. Everyone knows the stock market reflects the true health of the nation – multi-millionaire Jim Cramer and his millionaire CNBC talking head cohorts tell us so. Ignore the fact that the bottom 80% only own 5% of the financial assets in this country and are not benefitted by the stock market in any way. It is time to open your eyes and arise from your stupor. Observe what is happening around you. Look closely. Does the storyline match what you see in your ever day reality? It is them versus us. Whether you call them the invisible government, ruling class, financial overlords, oligarchs, the powers that be, ruling elite, or owners; there are powerful wealthy men who call the shots in this global criminal enterprise. No amount of propaganda can cover up the physical, economic, social, and psychological descent afflicting our world. There’s a bad moon rising and trouble is on the way.

 
CapStruc's picture

Are Businesspeople Really Fooled?





What if the businesses were fully aware that interest rates were being manipulated? What if they knew exactly how and why this was happening? Would they still misallocate their investments?

 
Reggie Middleton's picture

Value Your College Degree Now In 30 Minutes! I Mathematically Prove Ivy League To Be A Waste Of Money!





Don't hate me, and don't shoot the messenger. As a matter of fact, don't argue with simple arithmetic. Those high falutin' Ivy diplomas just ain't worth the time & money & here's a simple way to PROVE IT!!!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Weekly Bull/Bear Recap: Feb. 11-15, 2013





The one-stop, comprehensive summary of the key positive and negative news and events in the past week.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Weekly Bull/Bear Recap: Feb. 11-15, 2013 (And G-20 Preview)





This objective report concisely summarizes important macro events over the past week.  It is not geared to push an agenda.  Impartiality is necessary to avoid costly psychological traps, which all investors are prone to, such as confirmation, conservatism, and endowment biases. Also - from Citi's Steven Englander - what to worry about from this weekend's G-20 extravaganza...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 30





  • Boeing misses Q4 top line ($22.3 bn, Exp. $22.33 bn) beats EPS ($1.28, Exp. $1.18), guides lower: 2013 revenue $82-85 bn, Exp. 87.9 bn
  • Hilsenrath discovers DV01: Fed Risks Losses From Bonds  (WSJ)
  • Airlines had 787 battery issues before groundings (Reuters)
  • Monte Paschi ignored warnings over risk, documents show (Reuters) as did Mario Draghi
  • China averts local government defaults (FT)
  • Economy Probably Slowed as U.S. Spending Gain Drained Stockpiles (Bloomberg)
  • Bono Is No Match for Retail Slump Hitting Dublin’s Fifth Avenue (BBG)
  • Catalonia requests €9bn from rescue fund (FT)
  • US plans more skilled migrant visas (FT)
  • Japan PM shrugs off global criticism over latest stimulus steps (Reuters)
  • CIA nominee had detailed knowledge of "enhanced interrogation techniques" (Reuters)
  • Cleanliness Meets Godliness as Russia Reeled Into Cyprus (BBG)
  • Deutsche Bank Seen Missing Goldman-Led Gains on Cost Rise (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Apparitions In The Fog





After digesting the opinions of the shills, shysters and scam artists, I am ready to predict that I have no clue what will happen during 2013. The fog of uncertainty is engulfing the nation, making consumers hesitant to spend and businesses reluctant to hire or invest. Virtually all of the mainstream media, Wall Street banks and paid shill economists are in agreement that 2013 will see improvement in employment, housing, retail spending and, of course the only thing that matters to the ruling class, the stock market. Even among the alternative media, there seems to be a consensus that we will continue to muddle through and the day of reckoning is still a few years off. Those who are predicting improvements are either ignorant of history or are being paid to predict improvement, despite the overwhelming evidence of a worsening economic climate. The mainstream media pundits, fulfilling their assigned task of purveying feel good propaganda, use the 10% stock market gain in 2012 as proof of economic recovery. The facts prove otherwise... Every day more people are realizing the con-job being perpetuated by the owners of this country. Will the tipping point be reached in 2013? I don’t know. But the era of decisiveness and confrontation has arrived. The existing social order will be swept away. Are you prepared?

 
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