Renaissance

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Hilsenrath Backs Away From His "Considerable Time" Prediction





Yesterday's exuberant equity market reaction has been largely defined by the mainstream media as driven by WSJ Hilsenrath's 'confirmation' that Yellen will keep the uber-dovish phrase "considerable time" in the FOMC statement today. So, we wonder, why did the Fed-whisperer, after markets had closed last night, issue a quasi-retraction of his prediction explaining that instead of some prohetical "I just know" statement, it was a "best guess," as he concluded, "will the Fed take these steps? Only the people in the room know that. The rest of us will see Wednesday afternoon." It appears the sell-side disagrees with him on the language...

 
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Hilsenrath Front-Runs Fed: Hints "Considerable Time" Language Will Remain





The last week has been dominated by sell-side strategists raising hawkish concerns about this week's FOMC with a focus on the drop of the "considerable time" language describing the period from the end of QE to the start of rate hikes. The Wall Street Journal's Fed-whisperer Jon Hilsenrath just dropped a rather large hint that that the "considerable period" language will remain... Given the economic backdrop, they don’t want to send a signal right now that rate increases are imminent." Here's what the street thinks...

 
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What It Looks Like When The Second Auto Subprime Bubble Pops





One can kiss the US subprime-driven "manufacturing renaissance" goodbye. The reason, as we reported moments ago, Industrial Production dropped 0.1%, driven by a -0.4% contraction in manufacturing, the worst print since the "harsh winter collapse" of January 2014. The answer to the key question, what drove the tumble, is simple: what goes up has come down, in this case production of Motor Vehciles and Part, after posting its best number in 5 years, just posted... it worst monthly drop in five years, or since May 2009 to be precise. As the chart below shows, following July's month's 9.3% surge in production of motor vehicles and parts, August has come and wiped out all the gains, with a 7.6% plunge, the bigest collapse since May 2009.

 
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Quality Of Jobs Created In August Deteriorates Again





Back in 2011 we noted that while the market, and at the time, the Fed, have been focused exclusively on the quantity of jobs created each month, a far more important aspect of the US economic recovery is the quality of newly created jobs. It took the Fed about three years to catch up but it finally did, and Yellen no longer cares so much about the headline NFP print or the unemployment number but rather how good the newly created jobs are, manifesting in the quality of wages and earnings. So what was the quality of seasonally-adjusted job gains in August? In a word: disturbing. Of the 142K jobs created, just under half came from the lowest paying jobs possible: education and health; leisure and hospitality; and temp-help. The best paying jobs, finance and information, added a whopping 4K jobs between them. Finally, about that much delayed US manufacturing renaissance: stick a fork in it - in August the number of manufacturing jobs created was exactly 0.

 
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"God of Crude Oil Trading" Goes All In On Crude At $150 Bet





Andy Hall - known as the God of Crude Oil Trading to some of his peers - has, according to Bloomberg, built his success on a simple creed: Everyone who disagrees with him is wrong. He was one of the few traders who anticipated both the run-up in and the eventual crash of oil prices in 2008. Hall has made billions for the companies for which he’s traded by placing one aggressive bet after another; and now, he is all-in again. Hall is going all in on a bet that the shale-oil boom will play out far sooner than many analysts expect, resulting in a steady increase in prices to as much as $150 a barrel in five years or less. As one industry CEO warned, "anybody who bets against Andy Hall might be making a poor bet."

 
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China Has Lost 55% Of Its Most Valuable Resource





Roughly 60% of California right now is suffering “extreme drought” conditions. 30% of the state is in “severe drought”. And 10% of the state is only under “drought”. In other words, roughly the entire state - the 8th largest economy in the world – is facing a severe shortage of water. But if you think that’s bad, China is about to take over the spotlight yet again. A study by China’s Ministry of Water Resources found that approximately 55% of China’s 50,000 rivers that existed in the 1990s have disappeared.

 
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Wall Street's Take On Jackson Hole: "Yellen Was Not Dovish Enough"





Confused by what Janet Yellen said? As it turns out, so is everyone else, where the prevailing sentiment across the sell-side analysts was that Yellen was not dovish enough. Then again, with expectations bordering on Yellen giving the "BTFATH" green light, there is no way she was not going to disappoint...

 
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Previewing Yellen's Jackon Hole "Gobbledygook": Not One Analyst Thinks Yellen Will Say Anything Remotely Hawkish





Ahead of Yellen's Jackson Hole speech tomorrow, the sell-side, hypnotized by 6 years of Fed bubble-inflating generosity, refuses to even consider the possibility that the Fed could possibly pull the punch bowl away, and the absolutely unanimous consensus is that despite yesterday's minutes (or perhaps due to, because as the Chinese Department of Truth has taught us, one must first and foremost baffle with BS), Yellen will go uber-dove. So without further ado, here is what the Penguins expect Yellen's "gobbledygook" will reveal tomorrow, and as a reminder, yesterday Citi warned that there is "tremendous" downside risk if Yellen doesn't go "full-dovish".

 
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Obamacare Is A Disaster For Businesses, Philly Fed Finds





Remember all those allegations that Obamacare would be an unmitigated disaster for businesses, especially smaller companies? Well, now we have proof.

 
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Philly Fed Surges To Highest Since March 2011 Despite Plunge In Jobs & New Orders





Philly Fed has beaten expectations for 6 months in a row with its biggest surge since the 2009 lows. Against expectations of 19.3, Philly Fed printed 28.0 - highest since March 2011 all-time highs. All sounds awesome right? Umm, no, 7 of 9 internal declined including - New Orders tanked, Employment tumbled, Prices Paid plunged, and Prices Received slumped. So, in case you were wondering how it is possible that Philly Fed surged given such shitty internals, the 6-month forecast index ("hope") just surged to 22-year highs. And not only that: put all hopes of that long-delayed CapEx renaissance on hold: "While most broad indicators of future growth have been improving, the survey’s future capital spending index has been slipping. Although the index decreased just 1 point this month, its reading, at 17.5, is now the lowest it has been in seven months."

 
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Bullard Again Urges Bondholders To Sell, Stop Fighting The Fed





Two months ago, Fed's Bullard went full hawktard and implicitly told bondholders to "sell, sell, sell." As we explained here, there was a hidden motive for his demands - the bond market was breaking bad. So, perhaps it is not a total surprise that on the week when Treasury "fails to deliver" break back above $1bn to 2-month highs (broken market), that Jim Bullard is back:

*BULLARD SAYS MARKET TRADING 'TOO DOVISHLY' COMPARED TO FOMC, TIPS REAL RATE `SHOCKINGLY LOW'
*BULLARD SAYS HE SEES FIRST RATE RISE AT END OF 1Q 2015

As Renaissance Macro's Neil Dutta adds, confirming Bullard's meme, while recent moves in 10Y USTs have been driven mostly by geopolitical concerns and softening global economy, "we suspect that there may be a misreading of Fed policy." Or 'the market' knows full well how this ends?

 
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World Reserve Currencies: What Happened During Previous Periods Of Transition?





Global crises wreak havoc on all levels of existence, not to the mention the great cost to human lives. If we are to learn from history, however, it seems as though we might have to nevertheless brace ourselves for yet another one in the near future, as it marks the end of one saeculum and the start of a new economic paradigm aligned more positively with proper balances of trade, debt, and policies. The US is trying to postpone the crisis by printing money, however this is creating currency wars with nearly all major central banks in the world. As history has shown us time and again, causing this delay through money printing will only aggravate the problem, not only not preventing the inevitable, but indeed making the transition more painful and costly.

 
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Wal-Mart Cuts Guidance Again, Blames Obamacare





Remember this chart from November, when everyone was predicting a surge in global GDP and "escape velocity" growth for the US economy on the latest burst of irrational hopium that central-planning works (it doesn't)? It just got worse....

 
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Bubble Market Stunner: Revenueless Biotech Goes Public, Drops, Trades For Six Days, Then Voids Entire IPO





Glass breaking in slow motion reversed In what is certainly a historic, and quite stunning, market first, not to mention prima facie evidence that Janet Yellen was right about the biotech (and not only) bubble, last week the equity markets experienced something that has not happened in decades: a biotech firm went public, traded for six days, only to announce Friday that it would void its IPO and won't issue shares after all, thanks to a key investor's failure to follow through on a commitment to buy stock. In other words, days after going public, yet another darling of the momo bubble mania du jour, decided to undo everything, and went back to being private (and soon: bankrupt).

Huh?

 
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ADP Tumbles From June Exuberance, Misses 3rd Of Last 4 Months





Following last month's exuberant explosion of job gains according to ADP (the most since Nov 2012), the ADP employment report shows jobs missing expectations at 218k (vs 230k) and tumbling from the 281k print in June. Curious, there were still two days in the month when ADP estimated the full month print, which is curious considering ADP staunchly refuses to provide its unadjusted numbers. This is the 3rd ADP miss in 4 months. Zandi helpful addition, "there's job growth everywhere" except as we noted - not as much as expected. Today's print appears the anti-goldilocks, not low enough to prompt the Fed to get more dovish and not high enough to suggest growth is anything like markets expect.

 
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