Citigroup

Currency Wars Re-Escalate As Bank Of Korea Eases To Record Low Rate With Surprises Rate Cut

 With the 655th rate-cut globally since Lehman, the Bank of Korea stunned the market tonight and cut rates 25bps to 1.25% (a record low). Only 1 of 18 economists expected a rate cut as it appears record highs in US equities signal nothing about the underlying turmoil in the world's economy. After 6 straight days stronger (against the USD), the Won is sliding back above 1160 as it seems the currency wars are reigniting in AsiaPac...

Frontrunning: June 8

  • World stocks struggle to build on highs as Europe weighs (Reuters)
  • Oil hits eight-month high on disruptions, Chinese demand (Reuters)
  • Hillary Clinton Set for Democratic Nomination After Primary Wins (WSJ)
  • DNC avoids calling Clinton presumptive nominee (The Hill)
  • Trump, Rattled by Critics, Treads Carefully in Victory Speech (BBG)

Frontrunning: June 7

  • Soothing Fed sounds send stocks to five-week high (Reuters)
  • Clinton reaches magic number in fight for Democratic nomination (Reuters)
  • Euro-Area Economy Grows Faster as Consumption Gathers Pace (BBG)
  • Trump unyielding on Hispanic judge uproar (Reuters)
  • European Firms Find ‘Increasingly Hostile’ Environment in China (WSJ)
  • China tells U.S. to play constructive South China Sea role (Reuters)

Goldman Sachs Gets A Quarter Million Summer Job Applicants

Goldman Sachs attracted more than a quarter of a million applications from students and graduates for jobs this summer, "suggesting fears of a ‘brain drain’ in the sector may be exaggerated as banks introduce more employee-friendly policies." The number of applications from students and graduates globally have risen more than 40% since 2012, the paper adds. This means there is greater demand to get a job at Goldman than there is even in China where recently 1.2 million job candidates applied for 19,000 much-desired govermment positions.

The Case For A Super Glass-Steagall

By embracing this kind of Super Glass-Steagall Trump would consolidate his base in the flyover zones and reel in some of the Bernie Sanders throng, too. The latter will never forgive Clinton for her Goldman Sachs speech whoring. And that’s to say nothing of her full-throated support for the 2008 bank bailouts and the Fed’s subsequent giant gifts of QE and ZIRP to the Wall Street gamblers.

Jamie Dimon Warns "Someone Will Get Hurt In Auto Lending" As Citi Sees No Rebound From Abysmal First Quarter

Jamie Dimon said the market for U.S. automobile lending is “a little stressed” and that he foresees higher losses ahead for some competitors. “Someone will get hurt in auto lending,” but not JPMorgan, Dimon said. Meanwhile, CEO Citigroup Mike Corbat indicated that the company's second-quarter net income will be roughly 25% lower than the same period a year earlier, roughly the same as the abysmal first quarter.

Former JPM FX Salesman Claims He Was "Tossed Overboard In An Attempt To Make JPM Look Clean"

With banks eager to scrub the pervasive FX rigging and manipulation which has been one of the scandals plaguing the banking sector over the past two years, numerous lowly traders had been thrown under the legal bus as the traditional scapegoats meant to deflect attention from company insiders and senior management, many of whom were well aware of the illegal practices taking place. Increasingly more however, refuse to accept this fate.

The Consequences Of $50 Oil

If U.S. shale stays competitive, it could trigger another round of production increases from Saudi Arabia, which is determined to do its utmost to hold on to market share even as it boasts of long-term plans to build an “oil-less” economy by 2030. The Saudi bottom line has been ravaged by years of low prices, generating huge budget deficits and debts to contractors (which the Saudi government will attempt to cover through IOUs). Nevertheless, Saudi Arabia remains uniquely positioned to weather such storms; should the price fall again, it is better-placed to retain market share than the high-cost producers in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Frontrunning: May 27

  • Oil prices ease from seven-month high to below $49 (Reuters)
  • Wall Street Waits for Yellen Before Taking Off for a Long Weekend (BBG)
  • Donald Trump Celebrates Clinching GOP Delegate Race (WSJ)
  • Trump vows to undo Obama's climate agenda in appeal to oil sector (Reuters)
  • Japan Fails in Bid to Have G-7 Warn of Global Crisis Risk (BBG)
  • Valeant Rejected Joint Takeover Approach From Takeda, TPG (WSJ)

"The Freeze Is Finished" - Why Did Saudi Arabia Kill OPEC?

The OPEC meeting is only a week away, but the chances of a positive result are as remote as ever. Rising oil prices, the heightened rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran, and Saudi Arabia’s willingness to go it alone will make a deal all but impossible. "I don't think OPEC will decide anything," a source from a major oil producer in the Middle East told Reuters. "The market is recovering because of supply disruptions and demand recovery." An OPEC delegate told Reuters that any changes to the cartel’s policy is off the table. “Nothing. The freeze is finished,” the OPEC source said.

Frontrunning: May 26

  • Wall Street Crime: 7 Years, 156 Cases and Few Convictions (WSJ)
  • Japan's Abe points to 2008 crisis as G7 leaders debate global risk (Reuters)
  • Brent Crude Rises Above $50 a Barrel (WSJ)
  • New York financial regulator gearing up to probe online lenders (Reuters)
  • At Swinging Wall Street Parties, the Feds Are Now on the Prowl (BBG)

'There Will Be Banker Blood': Why JPM Is Afraid Of "Quiet Trading Floors"

With banker bonuses set to drop this year, it should be no surprise that things are not all sunshine and roses on Wall Street. After 30 years of dramatically outperforming Main Street, Wall Street wages may be set for some mean-reversion as JPMorgan analysts take an ax to the biggest global investment banks' earnings. As Bloomberg reports, "quiet trading floors" are set to depress global investment banks’ second-quarter revenue 24 percent, with weakness across equities, interest rates, currencies, with a regionally-driven weakness from Asia.

16 Months & Counting...

These are not normal times; treating them as such will likely turn out to be a grave error...