• Tim Knight from...
    02/06/2016 - 00:25
    What we must remember is this: we are in a bear market, and the risk of a countertrend rally is present, but confined. The opportunity on the downside movement dwarfs the risk of a push higher, as...
  • Phoenix Capital...
    02/06/2016 - 10:15
    2008 was caused by derivatives based on consumer-focused assets (houses). The next crisis will be driven by derivatives on government-focused assets (bonds).

Citigroup

Tyler Durden's picture

The Ghost Cities Finally Died: For China's Steel Industry "The Outlook Is The Worst Ever Amid Unprecedented Losses"





In late 2014 something happened: for whatever reason the most unregulated aspect of China's financial system, its shadow banks, not only stopped lending money but actually went into reverse, thus putting a lid on China's Total Social Financing expansion, which had been the world's "under the radar" growth dynamo for so many years. At that moment not only did China's ghost cities officially die, but it meant an imminent collapse for China's steel industry. That collapse has arrived.

 
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The BoJ Owns 52% Of The Entire Japanese ETF Market , And Now It Wants More





Haruhiko Kuroda owns 52% of all Japanese ETFs. And now he wants more. Facing a lack of willing JGB sellers, the BoJ now faces the possibility that ramping up its easing efforts will entail expanding the bank's already elephantine equity portfolio. "At a fundamental level, I don’t support the idea of central banks buying ETFs or equities. Unlike bonds, equities never redeem. That means they will have to be sold at some point, which creates market risk."

 
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Why the Fed HATES Physical Cash and Could Move to Tax It





In its efforts to prop up the Too Big To Fail banks, the Fed has made keeping your money in a bank a low value proposition.

 
 
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Frontrunning: October 26





  • European shares slip as easing expectations fade (Reuters)
  • Valeant and Pharmacy More Intertwined Than Thought (WSJ)
  • The Pawn Isolated: Valeant, Philidor and the Annals of Fraud (WSJ)
  • Strongest Afghan Quake Since 1949 Triggers Search for Survivors (BBG)
  • EU Agrees To Tighten Border Controls And Slow Migrant Arrival (AP)
  • Volkswagen Suspends More Employees (WSJ)
  • Volkswagen Loses Global Sales Lead to Toyota Amid Diesel Scandal (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Just When You Thought Wall Street's Heist Couldn't Get Any Crazier...





In reading various recent regulatory reports, it is clear that almost none of the promises that were made to the public about what was going to happen under Dodd-Frank financial reform is actually happening. Welcome to another day at the casino where the model continues to be — heads they win, tails you lose.

 
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U.S. Shale Drillers Running Out Of Options, Fast





Much has been made about the impressive gains in efficiency and productivity in the shale patch, as new drilling techniques squeeze ever more oil and gas out of new wells. But the limits to such an approach are becoming increasingly visible. The U.S. shale revolution is running out of steam.

 
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What Will Mario Draghi Announce Tomorrow: Here Is What Wall Street Thinks





Tomorrow morning Mario Draghi is widely expected to if not announce an extension, or expansion, of the ECB's QE program, than to at least jawbone sufficiently, and push the EURUSD lower from its recently anchored level in the 1.10-1.20 range. But what are the specifics of Draghi's announcement: will he merely expand the monetization limit per security, as he did in early September, will he increase the universe of eligibile securities, or will he simply extend the maturity of the non-open ended QE from September 2016 to some indefinite date? The following list, courtesy of Bloomberg, summarizes what the sellside universe believes Draghi will unveil in just under 12 hours.

 
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Capital Is Still Flowing Out Of China, Here's How Beijing Is Hiding It





Much like the NBS will obscure any weakness below 7% in China’s GDP data, the PBoC will do “whatever it takes” (central bank pun fully intended) to make sure the market doesn’t get wind of the fact that there’s still a tremendous amount of pressure in terms of capital outflows. As Bloomberg reports, "The People’s Bank of China and local lenders increased their holdings in onshore forwards to $67.9 billion in August, positions that would boost China’s currency against the dollar. The amount is five times more than the average in the first seven months."

 
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It's Back To The Future As Stocks, Futures Jump On The Latest Abysmal Economic News; China Tremors Return





26 years ago, today was envisioned as day when cars flew, holographic movies were box office hits, hoverboards roamed, and people were fired by fax. None of the happened. Instead the only "back to the future" moment this morning is a deja vu one we have seen every day for the past 7 years: bad economic news leading to surging stocks.

 
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Then It Was BlackRock, Now It's Blackstone But The Result Will Be The Same





Whether one calls it the latest glitch in the matrix, or yet another "market peak" indicator, the outcome will be the same.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 20





  • Canada's Trudeau topples PM Harper in shock election win (Reuters)
  • Where Canada’s Harper Hit Hurdles (WSJ)
  • Pugnacious Trudeau Steps Out of Father's Shadow and Into Power (BBG)
  • European Stocks Decline, Euro Rallies as ECB QE Optimism Fades (BBG)
  • Valeant, Under Pressure About Price Increases, Plans Changes (WSJ)
  • Syrian rebels say they receive more weapons for Aleppo battle (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Buying Panic Fizzles As Option Expiration Looms





In the absence of any key economic developments in the Asian trading session, Asian stocks traded mostly under the influence of the late, pre-opex US ramp momentum courtesy of another day of ugly economic data in the US (bad econ news is good news for liquidity addicts), closing solidly in the green across the board, led by China (+1.6%) and Japan (+1.1%) thanks in no small part to the latest tumble in the Yen carry trade, which mirrored a bout of USD overnight weakness. And since a major part of the risk on move yesterday was due to Ewald Nowotny's comments welcoming more QE, news from Eurostat that Eurozone CPI in September dropped -0.1% confirming Europe's deflation continues, should only be greeted with even more buying as it suggests further easing by the ECB is inevitable.

 
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There Goes The Final Pillar Of The US "Recovery": The Loan-Growth Paradox Explained





One year ago we reported that companies were using secured bank debt to repurchase stock: a stunning, foolhardy development. It so unbelievable we promptly forgot this bizarre tangent into "use of loan funds"... Until today when we found that it was, indeed, all a lie and that the banks themselves had become complicit in perpetuating not only the worst possible capital misallocation, but being an accessory to the US stagnation, soon to be replaced with full-blown recession.

 
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BlackRock Warns Of "Land Mines" As Benefits Of Lower Yields For Corporate Issuers Fades





As we have warned numerous times - and any trader old enough to have actually lived through a credit cycle can attest to - there is only so much releveraging shareholder-friendly exuberance firms can do before the company's balance sheet becomes questionable. That inflection point has come for US equities. The deterioration of balance-sheet health is "increasingly alarming" and will only worsen if earnings growth continues to stall amid a global economic slowdown, according to Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan's Eric Beinstein warns "the benefit of lower yields for corporate issuers is fading." The weakness is widespread as BlackRock fears "you’ll continue to see some land mines out there."

 
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