Craig Schmidt

Bank Of America Merrill Lynch Gets Paid To Pay Itself Back In Developers Diversified

REIT stocks benefited mightily from Merrill Lynch's generosity earlier in the year, when the ML REIT team issued follow on equity offerings, followed by prompt upgrades to the stock, although not necessarily in that order. The bottom line - roughly 5% in underwriter fees on almost $20 billion worth of new equity issued. And while last week's REIT massively downsized IPOs were an indication that the top for REIT stocks has come, that has not prevented Ken Lewis' firm from continuing to profit handsomely from the next shoe to drop in real estate.

Merrill's New REIT Teams Marks REIT Territory

The brand spanking new team (and legacy boy Craig Schmidt) that Merrill recently acquired from some other bank (I wrote about this, but frankly don't remember where these clowns came from nor do I care), just went to town all over the REIT bathroom and marked their territory effusively. ML in fact distributed a 45 page reinitiation report, which I have no intention of ever reading.

Merrill's New REIT Teams Marks REIT Territory

The brand spanking new team (and legacy boy Craig Schmidt) that Merrill recently acquired from some other bank (I wrote about this, but frankly don't remember where these clowns came from nor do I care), just went to town all over the REIT bathroom and marked their territory effusively. ML in fact distributed a 45 page reinitiation report, which I have no intention of ever reading. The summary ratings and price targets are below.

Merrill's New REIT Teams Marks REIT Territory

The brand spanking new team (and legacy boy Craig Schmidt) that Merrill recently acquired from some other bank (I wrote about this, but frankly don't remember where these clowns came from nor do I care), just went to town all over the REIT bathroom and marked their territory effusively. ML in fact distributed a 45 page reinitiation report, which I have no intention of ever reading. The summary ratings and price targets are below.

CBRE: This Has NOT Been A Liquidity Crisis, But A Crisis Of Bad Credit

Maybe the administration will finally listen when one of their own potential bailout beneficiaries tells them the sad truth about the inevitable CRE implosion. Surprisingly, a very good summary of the CRE debacle straight out of CBRE Partners (with $36 Billion AUM, it is just 3x larger than Cohen And Steers). Speaking of... Where are those CMBS downgrades S&P: getting some phone calls from the administration lately?

Merrill Lynch In Full REIT Upgrade Mode - The Sequel

Been a while since we heard from the most popular (and profitable) research (and trading) desk on Wall Street. Last night Merrill analyst Craig Schmidt went to town upgrading pretty much anything he could get his hands on. To wit, all from the last 24 hours:

Merrill: "Retail REITs - Tough But Stabilizing"

In his first note released in the post Sakwa world, Craig Schmidt continues to attempt to restore confidence in retail REITs. It would, after all, seem prudent to bang clients' heads into their desks until they see the light at the end of the tunnel (oncoming bullet train?) at a time when the only cash, and equity value, REITs can create is by raising expensive, dilutive equity in order to repay the cheapest form of capital (that of secured loans previously held by Mr. Schmidt uber parent, Bank of America).

REIT Analyst Leaves Bank Of America In Midst Of Most Lucrative Period For Group

Steve Sakwa, whose work product Zero Hedge has not spared its praise for in the past, has left the building. The "top rated" REIT analyst, who gained prominence in the past 2 months for such great work as an upgrade of virtually all companies he covers, has departed for greener, although unknown, pastures. It is quite odd that Sakwa would leave the bank at a time when his group was generating more revenue than virtually any analyst/trading group on Wall Street.

Not So Deep SPG Thoughts Post The 2nd Equity Dilution

Everyone's favorite REIT analyst Craig Schmidt raising his Price Objective from $48 to $52 on the second dilution orchestrated by his parent in just as many months.

I am Cohen And Steers' total lack of surprise.

Not So Deep SPG Thoughts Post The 2nd Equity Dilution

Everyone's favorite REIT analyst Craig Schmidt raising his Price Objective from $48 to $52 on the second dilution orchestrated by his parent in just as many months.

I am Cohen And Steers' total lack of surprise.

Not So Deep SPG Thoughts Post The 2nd Equity Dilution

Everyone's favorite REIT analyst Craig Schmidt raising his Price Objective from $48 to $52 on the second dilution orchestrated by his parent in just as many months.

I am Cohen And Steers' total lack of surprise.

Wall Street Back To Its Criminal Ways?

There was a time on Wall Street when insider trading was rampant, when sellside analysts would pump stocks under the guidance of their superiors only to have their corporate finance colleagues do an equity offer shortly after, when the amount of money a bank's corporate clients paid would determine its rating, and when analysts said in internal emails a company is worthless, only to issue reports claiming the company was the next sliced bread. Then things changed for the better briefly, when Spitzer came on the stage.

Wall Street Back To Its Criminal Ways?

There was a time on Wall Street when insider trading was rampant, when sellside analysts would pump stocks under the guidance of their superiors only to have their corporate finance colleagues do an equity offer shortly after, when the amount of money a bank's corporate clients paid would determine its rating, and when analysts said in internal emails a company is worthless, only to issue reports claiming the company was the next sliced bread. Then things changed for the better briefly, when Spitzer came on the stage.

Wall Street Back To Its Criminal Ways?

There was a time on Wall Street when insider trading was rampant, when sellside analysts would pump stocks under the guidance of their superiors only to have their corporate finance colleagues do an equity offer shortly after, when the amount of money a bank's corporate clients paid would determine its rating, and when analysts said in internal emails a company is worthless, only to issue reports claiming the company was the next sliced bread. Then things changed for the better briefly, when Spitzer came on the stage.