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Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: All I Want For Christmas Is The Truth





We find ourselves more amazed than ever at the ability of those in power to lie, misinform and obfuscate the truth, while millions of Americans willfully choose to be ignorant of the truth and yearn to be misled. It’s a match made in heaven. Acknowledging the truth of our society’s descent from a country of hard working, self-reliant, charitable, civic minded citizens into the abyss of entitled, dependent, greedy, materialistic consumers is unacceptable to the slave owners and the slaves. We can’t handle the truth because that would require critical thought, hard choices, sacrifice, and dealing with the reality of an unsustainable economic and societal model. It’s much easier to believe the big lies that allow us to sleep at night. The concept of lying to the masses and using propaganda techniques to manipulate and form public opinion really took hold in the 1920s and have been perfected by the powerful ruling elite that control the reins of finance, government and mass media. How many Americans are awake enough to handle the truth? Abraham Lincoln once said that he believed in the people and that if you told them the truth and gave them the cold hard facts they would meet any crisis. That may have been true in 1860, but not today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman Interviews Bain Capital On The Future Of... Outsourcing And Labor





After this year's presidential campaign, private equity and certainly Bain Capital, will likely be the last entity that those pandering to populist agendas will go to advice over the future of the business cycle in broad terms, and the future of US labor, most certainly including outsourcing, in narrow terms. And Goldman - that staunch defender of the superiority of capital over labor - will hardly be confused as ever taking the role of workers in any discussion. Which is why we read the following interview by Goldman's Hugo Scott-Gall with Bain Capital partners Michael Garstka and Alan Bird on such topics as corporate restructurings and the future of outsourcing with great interest, as it is very much unlikely that any of the conventional media sources would carry it. And while one may have ideological biases in whatever direction, the truth as presented previously, is that US private equity is a massive "behind the scenes" juggernaut, whose portfolio holding companies account for a whopping 8% of US GDP, and is directly and indirectly responsible for tens of millions of currently employed US workers! At the end of the day, it may well be that what private equity firms such as Bain think about the future of US labor prospects is the most important thing that matters for the future of the so very critical US unemployment rate. Which is why we present, for your reading pleasure, the somewhat unorthodox interview below...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Gundlach: "I'm Waiting For Something To Go Kaboom"





Following some well-timed 'suggestions' in Natural Gas and Apple this year, the new bond guru has some rather more concerning views about the future of America. Reflecting on a dismal outlook progressing due to the fact that "Retirees take resources from a society, and workers produce resources", Gundlach has cut his exposure to US equities (apart from gold-miners and NatGas producers) noting their expensive valuation and low potential for growth. In a forthcoming Bloomberg Markets interview, the DoubleLine CEO warns we are about to enter the ominous third phase of the current debacle (Phase 1: a 27-year buildup of corporate, personal and sovereign debt. That lasted until 2008, when Phase 2 started, unfettered lending finally toppled banks and pushed the global economy into a recession, spurring governments and central banks to spend trillions of dollars to stimulate growth) as deeply indebted countries and companies, which Gundlach doesn’t name, will default sometime after 2013. "I don’t believe you’re going to get some sort of an early warning," Gundlach warns "You should be moving now."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 30





  • Turns out no free lunch after all: Greeks rage against pension calamity (Reuters)
  • Athens banks told of debt buyback ‘duty’ (FT)
  • U.N. Gives Palestinians 'State' Status (WSJ)
  • Obama's Cliff Offer Spurned (WSJ)
  • Republicans Reject Obama Budget as He Sells It to Public (Bloomberg)
  • Macau Gangster Who Missed Boom to Be Freed After 14 Years (Bloomberg)
  • China Economic Optimism Returns in Poll as Xi Beats Hu (Bloomberg)
  • Spain May Escape European Bailout, Former ECB Board Member Says (Bloomberg)... but they won't
  • After a bashing, BOJ weighs "big bang" war on deflation (Reuters)
  • Recession Left Baby Bust as U.S. Births Lowest Since 1920 (Bloomberg)
  • Japan unveils second Y880bn stimulus package (FT)
 
Reggie Middleton's picture

Let's face it, Smartphone Hardware Manufacturers Are Dead, Long Live The Google-like Solution Providers!





Sometimes the truth is a tough pill to swallow, particularly if that pill is low (and getting lower) margined hardward-based.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 28





  • Egypt protests continue in crisis over Mursi powers (Reuters)
  • Greece hires Deutsche, Morgan Stanley to run Greek voluntary debt buy back, sources say (Kathimerini)
  • Executives' Good Luck in Trading Own Stock (WSJ)
  • Hollande Presents Mittal Nationalization Among Site Options (Bloomberg)
  • Eurozone states face losses on Greek debt (FT)
  • Spain's rescued banks to shrink, slash jobs (Reuters)
  • EU Approves Spanish Banks' Restructuring Plans (WSJ)
  • At SAC, Portfolio Managers Are Treated Like Stocks (BBG)
  • China considers easing family planning rules (Reuters)
  • European Court to Rule Over ECB’s Secret Greek File (BusinessWeek)
  • And another top tick indicator: Asia Funds Buy London Offices in Bet Volatility Is Past (Bloomberg)
  • Harvard Doctor Turns Felon After Lure of Insider Trading (BBG)
  • Zucker Is Lead Candidate to Head CNN (WSJ) - it's not true until CNN misreports it
  • Iran "will press on with enrichment:" nuclear chief (Reuters)
 
AVFMS's picture

27 Nov 2012 – “ You Ain’t Seen Nothin' Yet ” (Bachman-Turner Overdrive, 1974)





Ok. It’s not that the Greek deal is nothing. But then again, third strike. Eventually expected, or at least hoped for. Hence, lack of concrete follow-through. So, now it’s there. And now what? You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet? What is there to see??? Pitch the markets some input, something concrete, something to feed off, something to see!

"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet" (Bunds 1,43% +2; Spain 5,51% -9; Stoxx 2538 -0,2%; EUR 1,293 -30)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Holiday Hangover Remains As Light Volume Lifts Equities To Exuberant Unch Close





Broadly speaking, risk markets seemed stuck in tryptophan-mode today but as always it was stocks that used a mediocre volume day to squeeze the odd name here or there. Facebook and Apple were the wunder-kind once again (with the latter now up almost 17% from its swing lows at its 30DMA and a 38.2% retrace of the high-to-low move). The Apple gain moved the Nasdaq into the green (for the sixth day in a row) but the S&P 500 (despite its best efforts into the close) was unable to reach green after overnight weakness. S&P 500 futures did managed to cross into the green (fill the gap) as the day-session closed but Treasury yields were lower all day and signaled considerably less exuberance. FX markets oscillated in ever-decreasing ranges as everyone waits for the next eurogroup bullgasm. Commodities wondered aimlessly with Oil down and Copper up and gold/silver either here nor there. VIX rose modestly to 15.5% by the close as credit markets overall underperformed stocks

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 26





  • Goldman Turns Down Southern Europe Banks as Crisis Lingers (Bloomberg)
  • Euro Ministers Take Third Swing at Clearing Greek Payment (Bloomberg)
  • Chamber Sidestepped in Obama’s Talks on Avoiding Fiscal Cliff (Bloomberg)
  • Republicans and Democrats Differ on Taxes as Fiscal Cliff Looms (Bloomberg)
  • Republicans bargain hard over fiscal cliff (FT)
  • Catalan Pro-Independence Parties Win Regional Vote (BBG)
  • Shirakawa defends BoJ from attack (FT)
  • Run-off looms in Italy’s centre-left vote (FT)
  • BOJ rift surfaces over easing as political debate heats up (Reuters)
  • Barnier seeks ‘political will’ on bank union (FT)
  • New BOJ Members Sought More-Expansionary Wording (Bloomberg)
  • Osborne May Extend U.K. Austerity to 2018, IFS Says (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Retailers Blame Drop In Black Friday Sales On Black Thursday





With all bad news on the tape now having a suitable "explanation", be it a prior president, a tropical storm, the weather being too hot, the weather being too cold, the weather being just right, but never, ever someone actually taking blame for the fact that life is what happens when corporate CEOs (and sovereign presidents) are busy making "priced to perfection" plans. So it is with what is now a confirmed flop of a Black Friday, which according to ShopperTrak saw sales drop by nearly 2% to $11.2 from 2011, which in turn was a 6.6% gain over 2010 (and would be revised to far lower once all the refunds and exchanges to cash took place in the two weeks later). This occurred despite a 3.5% increase in retail foot traffic to 307.7 million store visits. The nominal drop in retail sales also occurred despite a nearly 1% increase in the total US population over last Thanksgiving, and a 2% Y/Y inflation. But fear not: the ad hoc excuse for this "surprising" loss in purchasing power is already handy: it is all Black Thursday's fault, or the latest idiotic attempt by retailers to cannibalize their own future sales by diluting the exclusivity of Black Friday, and which will force all retailers to follow the sovereigns in a race to the bottom, as soon every day will be the equivalent of Black Friday. But at least retailers have another 364 years worth of excuses for the conceivable future to excuse any and all store weakness. Next year: it's all Black Wednesday's fault.

 
AVFMS's picture

20 Nov 2012 – “A Tout Le Monde (Set Me Free) ” (Megadeth, 1995)





Uh…  Very uncomfortable French downgrade. Not surprising per se, but uncomfortable. Ask the EFSF… Brings back the question of “Who’s Next”? European Risk (Equities & Credit), however, oblivious and taking rising yields as a sure sign for Risk On. I’d see the risk of France (and everyone else) starting to count contingent costs.

"A Tout Le Monde" (Bunds 1,41% +6; Spain 5,79% -9; Stoxx 2509 +0,6%; EUR 1,281 unch)

 
Tyler Durden's picture

French Downgrade Comes And Goes As Europe Open Fills EURUSD Gap





Another day, another melt up overnight wiping out all the post-Moody's weakness, this time coming courtesy of Europe, where following the French downgrade, the EURUSD filled its entire gap down and then some in the span of minutes following the European open, when it moved from 1.2775 to 1.2820 as if on command. And with the ES inextricably linked to the most active and levered pair in the world, it is is no surprise to see futures unchanged. It appears that the primary catalyst in the centrally planned market has become the opening of said "market" itself, as all other news flow is now largely irrelevant: after all the central planners have it all under control.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"The Fed, Having Used Its Bazookas, Is Now Down To Firecrackers"





Austerity is coming our way, it's just a matter in what manner and by how much, and whether it becomes an orderly or disorderly process. The fiscal cliff is really a bit of a ruse in that respect, but the key here is that years of fiscal profligacy is coming to an end and the Fed at this point, having used its bazookas, is now down to firecrackers. The economic outlook as such is completely muddled and along with that the prospect for any turnaround in corporate earnings... Once we get past the Fiscal Cliff we will confront the inherent inability of the Democrats and the GOP to embark on any grand bargain to blaze the trail for true fiscal reforms. The U.S. has not had a rewrite of its tax code since 1986, which was the year Microsoft went public and a decade prior to Al Gore's invention of the Internet. The tax system is massively inefficient and leads to a gross misallocation of resources that impedes economic progress — rewarding conspicuous consumption at the expense of savings and investment. It is the lingering uncertainty over the road to meaningful fiscal reform that is really the mot cause of the angst — the fiscal cliff is really a side show because who doesn't know that we are going to have a Khrushchev moment?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 19





  • Israel Ready to Invade Gaza If Cease-Fire Efforts Fail (Bloomberg)
  • Petraeus: A Phony Hero for a Phony War (NYT)
  • IMF'S Lagarde says Greek deal should be "rooted in reality" (Reuters) "rooted" or "roofied"? And where was it until now?
  • ECB's Asmussen says Greece to need aid beyond 2014 (AP)
  • EU makes budget plans without (FT)
  • Japanese Poll Shows LDP Advantage Ahead of Election (WSJ)
  • Shanghai Composite Dips Below, Regains 2,000 Level (Bloomberg)
  • Bond investor takes big punt on Ireland (FT)
  • Noda defends BoJ’s independence (FT) Indewhatnow?
  • Inaba Says BOJ Could Ease More If Government Reins in Debt (Bloomberg) Actually it's the other way around
  • Miles Says Bank of England Can Do More If U.K. Slump Persists (Bloomberg) So much for the end of QE
  • US tax breaks worth $150bn face axe (FT)
 
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