Budget Deficit

Argentina's First Bond Issuance In 15 Years Is Already Nearly 3x Oversubscribed

Almost exactly two years ago, in April 2014, Greece issued €2.5 billion in 5 year bond yielding around 5%, which was met with huge investor interest and ended up being 8x oversubscribed. Fast forward to today when another former shutout from global bond markets, Argentina, is in the FT's words, "on the cusp of one of the most anticipated comebacks in recent history, as the Latin American country ends a 15-year exile from the international debt market with a multibillion-dollar sale." This issue is likewise oversubscribed, and according to Reuters there are already $40 billion in roders for the $15 billion offering.

Hungary Issues Sovereign Bonds Denominated In Yuan: Another Nail In US Reserve Currency Status?

Hungary priced the three-year bond at a yield of 6.25%, raising 1 billion yuan ($154 million), a small size for a sovereign deal. Bankers not involved in the transaction estimate that if Hungary issued debt in U.S. dollars and swapped the proceeds into yuan, it would have paid almost 1% less in annual interest costs. The dim-sum market isn’t an appealing market right now. Issuance of offshore yuan bonds has been falling consistently since Beijing’s decision to devalue its currency by 2% in August last year—the prospect of another yuan devaluation has sapped much of the appeal of such bonds for offshore investors.

Former IMF Chief Economist Admits Japan's "Endgame" Scenario Is Now In Play

Japan is heading for a full-blown solvency crisis as the country runs out of local investors and may ultimately be forced to inflate away its debt in a desperate end-game, one of the world’s most influential economists has warned.  "One day the BoJ may well get a call from the finance ministry saying please think about us – it is a life or death question - and keep rates at zero for a bit longer."

Brazil Committee Votes To Begin Rousseff Impeachment Process: What Happens Next

Moments ago, in the first of two closely anticipated and watched votes, a special committee in Brazil's lower house voted 38 to 27 to begin the impeachment process against president Dilma Rousseff. But while the first key step in Rousseff's ouster has been taken, there is a long road ahead for the process and Dilma will not go quietly or without a fight.

Why "The Fed Can't Save Us": The Simple Explanation From Austrian Business Cycle Theory

Will the Fed be able to keep the game going? In a word, no. We’ve already seen that even the tiniest of interest rate hikes has gone hand in hand with a huge drop in the markets. Furthermore, the Fed’s subsidies to the banks are now on the order of $11 billion annually, but if they want to raise the fed funds rate to, say, 2 percent, then the annual payment would swell to more than $40 billion.

Disastrous Ticket Sales, Ongoing Political Turmoil Put Brazil Olympics In Jeopardy

With only four month to go until the Brazil summer olympics, only half of the tickets have been sold. Brazil’s new minister of sports Ricardo Leyser suggested that the Brazilian government may purchase tickets that will be distributed to public schools. He said public officials must also work to boost worldwide confidence in Rio's ability to host the games and ensure travelers' safety.

New Jersey In Fiscal Peril As David Tepper Departs

First it was Connecticut, now another state is in the crosshairs following the imminent "exstatiation" of another prominent hedge fund billionaire, David Tepper.  The decision by billionaire hedge-fund manager David Tepper to quit New Jersey for tax-friendly Florida has put the Garden State in fiscal peril, and  could complicate estimates of how much tax money the struggling state will collect, the head of the Legislature’s nonpartisan research branch warned lawmakers.

Brazil Posts Largest Budget Deficit Ever As Rousseff Cries "Coup," Olympic Ad Sales Top $1 Billion

Less than 24 hours after VP Michel Temer's PMDB split with President Dilma Rousseff's coalition government, Brazil posted its largest primary deficit on record, underscoring how dire the fiscal situation has become amid the political and economic turmoil. Meanwhile, NBC is still selling ads for this summer's Olympic games in Rio. Who's interested in some expensive air time?