Commercial Paper

Tyler Durden's picture

Volatility Vacuum - The Market Has Not Been Kept Honest





With a central bank following an asset inflation policy the flows are following performance. The Fed has unknowingly created winners and losers in the asset management business on a massive scale. The asset inflation environment also creates a volatility vacuum. Volatility is necessary to keep markets honest and provide long term stability. An investor must truly believe in their investment and must have performed significant due diligence to have the confidence to ride out the volatility. The market that is not kept honest is the one where reckless behavior proliferates, because it works and is profitable. The most prominent example is the massive carry trading that occurred during the last tightening cycle.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

What Do Greece and Louisiana Have in Common? The War on Cash





The Centralized Powers have declared a War on Cash... and it is spreading throughout the globe.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Pension Shocker: Plans Face $2 Trillion Shortfall, Moody's Says





"Moody’s, which in 2013 began using a lower rate than governments do to calculate future liabilities, has estimated that the 25 largest U.S. public pensions alone have $2 trillion less than they need", Bloomberg reports.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Santa Cruz County Votes To Cease Doing Business With 5 TBTF Mega Banks





It appears that Ryan Coonerty, the Supervisor of the Third District of Santa Cruz County, wrote a letter back in June to the rest of the Board of Supervisors, in which he bravely pleaded the county cease business operations with five of the TBTF Wall Street Mega Banks. Why you ask? Well, because they are criminal felons. Considering Eric Holder refused to punish them, someone has to take a stand...“There seems to be no limit to the greed in some our nation’s largest banks. I believe it is critical that the County only work with the most trustworthy institutions as we invest and protect the public’s tax dollars. Santa Cruz County should not be involved with those who rigged the world’s biggest financial markets."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Exclusive: The Inside Story Of How Deutsche Bank "Deals With" Whistleblowers





On November 7, 2011 Dr. Eric Ben-Artzi walked into a conference room at Deutsche Bank’s U.S. headquarters in lower Manhattan. Seated at a conference table was Sharon Wilson from the Human Resources department. Lars Popken, DB’s head of market risk methodology and Ben-Artzi’s manager, was videoconferenced in. Ben-Artzi’s job, Popken said, was being moved to Germany. Ben-Artzi thought back to the summer when, in response to rumors that some U.S. positions were likely to be moved overseas, he had mentioned he’d be happy to relocate to Berlin. No such luck. Minutes later, he was terminated and Wilson hurriedly ushered him out of the building. Ben-Artzi wasn’t even allowed to collect his personal belongings.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Are Central Bankers Poised To Break The World Again?





In his Pulitzer-Prize-winning book, Lords of Finance, the economist Liaquat Ahamad tells the story of how four central bankers, driven by staunch adherence to the gold standard, “broke the world” and triggered the Great Depression. Today’s central bankers largely share a new conventional wisdom – about the benefits of loose monetary policy. Are monetary policymakers poised to break the world again?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Moody's, Fitch Fret Over Billions In Student Loan ABS As Defaults Loom





The fact that Moody's and Fitch are beginning to reevaluate student loan ABS is indicative of an underlying shift in the market. Between the proliferation of IBR and the Department of Education's recent move to open the door for debt forgiveness in the wake of the Corinthian collapse, financial markets are beginning to see the writing on the wall. Perhaps Bill Ackman said it best: "there's no way students are going to pay it all back."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Warren Buffett Economy, Part 5: Why Its Days Are Numbered





Today’s style of heavy-handed monetary central planning destroys capitalist prosperity. Real capitalism cannot thrive unless inventive and enterprenurial genius is rewarded with outsized fortunes. Warren Buffett’s $73 billion net worth, and numerous like and similar financial gambling fortunes that have arisen since 1987, are not due to genius; they are owing to adept surfing on the $50 trillion bubble that has been generated by the central bank Keynesianism of Alan Greenspan and his successors.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Deutsche Bank The Next Lehman?





Looking back at the Lehman Brothers collapse of 2008, it’s amazing how quickly it all happened. In hindsight there were a few early-warning signs, but the true scale of the disaster publicly unfolded only in the final moments before it became apparent that Lehman was doomed. Could this happen to Deutsche Bank?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Here's What Happens When Your City Is Cut To Junk





Last month, Chicago saw its debt cut to junk at Moody's, triggering billions in accelerated payment rights and jeopardizing efforts to improve the city's finances in the face of a budget gap that's set to triple over three years. Citi has more on the dreaded "downgrade feedback loop."

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Good Luck Getting Your Money Out





In simple terms, if the system is ever under duress again, money market funds can lock in capital (meaning you can’t get your money out) for up to 10 days. This is just the start of a much larger strategy by the Fed to declare War on Cash.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Real Story Behind Deutsche Bank's Latest Book Cooking Settlement





On Tuesday, Deutsche Bank agreed to a $55 million SEC settlement tied to allegations it hid billions in losses by mismarking its crisis-era derivatives book. The bank has always contended its valuation methodologies were sound. Here is the real story...

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Why Central Banks HATE Cash and Will Begin to Tax It Shortly





As far as the Central Banks are concerned, this is a good thing because if investors/depositors were ever to try and convert even a small portion of this “wealth” into actual physical bills, the system would implode (there simply is not enough actual cash).

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Here We Go Again: Verizon To Buy AOL Marking Another Tech Bubble Top





The last time AOL was involved in a mega merger was January 2000, when AOL acquired Time Warner for $182 billion in what was the mega deal of the last tech bubble, creating a $350 billion behemoth. Fast forward 15 years and here is AOL again in yet another period-defining if far, far smaller transaction once again, when moments ago Verizon announced that it would acquire AOL for $50/share, a deal value of $4 .4billion. And with that the golden age of digital (and in many cases robotic) content, has now been top-ticked.

 

 
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