Corporate Leverage

August Corporate Bond Issuance Breaks All Records Thanks To Relentless Demand For Yield

It has been a scorching August for the continental US, with the government predicting, for the first time on record, that every square inch of all 50 states is forecast to see above-average temperatures for the next three months. However, that is nothing compared to what is taking place in the blistering bond market, where new bond issuance is on pace to blow away all records.

US Futures Dip, European Stocks Slide After EU Court Slams Italian Bank Bailout Plans

After a head-scratching S&P500 rally - which not even Goldman has been able to justify - pushed stocks to new all time highs with seemingly daily record highs regardless of fundamentals or geopolitical troubles, overnight US equity futures dipped modestly, tracking weak European stocks as demand for safe haven assets including U.S. Treasuries and gold rises. Asian stocks outside Japan fall. Crude oil trades near $45 a barrel. 

When Brexit Has Come And Gone, The Real Problems Will Remain: A Reminder From Socgen

Whatever the outcome of the Brexit vote this week investors will still be facing the prospect of negative rates and negative yields on a huge range of bonds, massive corporate leverage with worryingly rising delinquencies and of course expensive equity markets and falling profits. And whilst the market preference for the status quo might be celebrated in the short-term, actually when the fog clears all of the problems will still be there.

 

The "Crazy Growth In Corporate Debt" Is Finally Noticed: Bloomberg Issues Stark Warning

One does not have to be financial wizard to to know that a firm which has to borrow more than it can generate from core operations is not a sustainable business model, and yet today's CFOs, pundits and central bankers do not. But more are starting to pay attention as the corporate debt pile hits epic proportions. As Bloomberg writes this morning, when it also issued a stark warning about the next source of credit contagion, while "consumers were the Achilles’ heel of the U.S. economy in the run-up to the last recession. This time, companies may play that role."

Quantitative Easing And The Corruption Of Corporate America

Since the turn of this century, debt-financed share buybacks have severely tested the character of those charged with growing publicly-traded U.S. firms. Should she ignore the potential for further QE-financed share buybacks to exact more untold economic damage, it would be akin to intentionally corrupting Corporate America. The time, though, has come for these wayward companies’ banker and enabler, the Fed, to hold the line, no matter how difficult the next inevitable test of their character may prove to be. It’s time for the Fed to defend the entire Union and end a civil war that pits a chosen few against the economic freedom of the many.

China's Bad Debt Problem Is Much Deeper Than Just Real Estate

Among the bigger financial problems covered in depth on Zero Hedge over the past several years, were China's massive amount of newly created credit adding to an already unsustaimable debt load, its rapidly growing bad debt pile (what we call China's "neutron bomb" which as we first estimated last October is about 20% of total bank debt), and its sub-prime real estate bubble. Lately many others - especially Kyle Bass - have also started looking the same problems and asking a simple question: what is the real repayment ability of Chinese corporates now that this credit monster has been unleashed, and is the NPL problem isolated to just real estate. For those answers, we look at a recent Natixis report.

Janet's Jabbering Leaves Investors "On The Edge Of A Live Volcano"

The evidence that Yellen is clueless or a blatant liar is endless. The casino gamblers keep dancing on the edge of a live volcano in the belief that Yellen has their back. In fact, her statements this week prove once again that she is right there on the edge with them - jabbering incoherently. One of these days, even the silicon units in the casino will take notice. The dancing will then turn into diving for the doors.

S&P Revises China's Credit Outlook To Negative On Growth, Debt Concerns - Full Text

Ripley's believe it or not world continues. Earlier today, Hong Kong's Hang Seng market entered a bull market, rising 20% from its February lows, just as Hong Kong retail sales plunged 20.6%, the bigest drop since 1999 and then moments ago, in a move that pushed the Chinese Yuan stronger at least initially, S&P revised its Chinese outlook to negative, saying the economic rebalancing is likely to proceed more slowly than had expected over next 5 years and warning about China's debt load.

Global Stocks Levitate Despite Ongoing Oil Weakness; China Stocks Jump After Easing Margin Debt

At the same time as the PBOC was cautioning about the dangers of excess debt (just as it injected a record amount of loans into the financial system), China's central bank warned about dangers from a stock market bubble, and perhaps just to assure the bubble gets even bigger, at the same time China eased on margin debt limits, in the process sending Chinese stocks soaring higher by 2.2%, and pushing the Shanghai Composite over 3000 for the first time in months as China now appears set to attempt another housing bubble "soft landing" while at the same time restarting its housing bubble.