• GoldCore
    09/04/2015 - 07:43
    Large pools of gold in indebted nations will be vulnerable. Pool accounts, digital gold bullion vaulting providers and depositories in the UK and the US might have their companies and assets...
  • Sprott Money
    09/04/2015 - 05:58
    It can't continue indefinitely, and there has to be a terminal point, and I think obviously we're much closer to that.

Dallas Fed

Tyler Durden's picture

If You Don’t Trust the Fed, Here’s An Inside View That Confirms Your Worst Suspicions





Last month, we offered a plain language translation of the Warsh op-ed, because we thought it was too carefully worded and left readers wondering what he really wanted to say. Translation wasn’t necessary for Fisher’s speech, which contained a clear no-confidence vote in the Fed’s QE program. Now William Poole is more or less saying that we have no idea what’s truly behind the Fed’s decisions. But he doesn’t stop there. He’s willing to make a prediction that you wouldn’t expect from an establishment economist... Poole’s refreshingly honest take on the Fed’s inner workings – from someone who truly knows what goes on behind the curtains – is more than welcome.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed's Fisher Blasts "Flaccid" Monetary Policy, Says More CapEx Needed





We warned here (and here most recently), the most insidious way in which the Fed's ZIRP policy is now bleeding not only the middle class dry, but is forcing companies to reallocate cash in ways that benefit corporate shareholders at the present, at the expense of investing prudently for growth 2 or 3 years down the road. It seems the message is being heard loud and very clear among 'some' of the FOMC members; most notably Richard Fisher:

"Without fiscal policy that incentivizes rather than discourages U.S. capex (capital expenditure), this accommodative monetary policy aimed at reducing unemployment (especially structural unemployment) or improving the quality of jobs is rendered flaccid and less than optimally effective... I would feel more comfortable were we to remove ourselves as soon as possible from interfering with the normal price-setting functioning of financial markets."

Perhaps Yellen (and others) will listen this time?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Go Nowhere In Quiet Overnight Session





In fitting with the pre-holiday theme, and the moribund liquidity theme of the past few months and years, there was little of note in the overnight session with few event catalysts to guide futures beside the topping out EURJPY. Chinese stocks closed a shade of red following news local banks might be coming  under further scrutiny on their lending/accounting practices - the Chinese banking regulator has drafted rules restricting banks from using resale or repurchase agreements to move assets off their balance sheets as a way to sidestep loan-to-deposit ratios that constrain loan growth. The return of the nightly Japanese jawboning of the Yen did little to boost sentiment, as the Nikkei closed down 104 points to 15515. Japan has gotten to the point where merely talking a weaker Yen will no longer work, and the BOJ will actually have to do something - something which the ECB, whose currency is at a 4 year high against Japan, may not like.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stock Futures Rise To New Record Highs On Carry-Currency Driven Ramp





Another day, another carry currency-driven futures melt-up to daily record highs (the all important EURJPY soared overnight on the return of the now standard overnight Japanese jawboning of the JPY which sent the EURJPY just shy of a new 4 year high of 138 overnight), and another attempt by the ECB to have its record high market cake, and eat a lower Euro too (recall DB's said the "pain threshold" for the EUR/USD exchange rate - the level at which further appreciation impairs competitiveness and economic recovery - is $1.79 for Germany, $1.24 for France, and $1.17 for Italy) this time with ECB's Hansson repeating the generic talking point that the ECB is technically ready for negative deposit rates. However, with the halflife on such "threats" now measured in the minutes, and soon seconds, the European central bank will have to come up with something more original and creative soon, especially since the EURJPY can't really rise much more without really crushing European trade further.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Equity Levitation Interrupted On Strong Dollar, Weak Treasurys





Following a brief hiatus for the Veterans Day holiday, the spotlight will again shine on treasuries and emerging markets today. The theme of higher US yields and USD strength continue to play out in Asian trading. 10yr UST yields are drifting upwards, adding 3bp to take the 10yr treasury yield to 2.78% in Japanese trading: a near-two month high and just 22 bps away from that critical 3% barrier that crippled the Fed's tapering ambitions last time. Recall that 10yr yields added +15bp in its last US trading session on Friday, which was its weakest one day performance in yield terms since July. USD strength is the other theme in Asian trading this morning, which is driving USDJPY (+0.4%) higher, together with EM crosses including the USDIDR (+0.6%) and USDINR (+0.6%). EURUSD is a touch weaker following a headline by Dow Jones this morning that the Draghi is concerned about the possibility of deflation in the euro zone although he will dispute that publicly, citing Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung who source an unnamed ECB insider. The headline follows a number of similar stories in the FT and Bloomberg in recent days suggesting a split in the ECB’s governing council.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Flat As FOMC Begins 2-Day NOctaper Meeting





For those curious what Bernanke's market may do today, we flash back to yesterday's AM summary as follows: "Just as it is easy being a weatherman in San Diego ("the weather will be... nice. Back to you"), so the same inductive analysis can be applied to another week of stocks in Bernanke's centrally planned market: "stocks will be... up." Add to this yesterday's revelations in which "JPM Sees "Most Extreme Ever Excess Liquidity" Bubble After $3 Trillion "Created" In First 9 Months Of 2013" and the full picture is clear. So while yesterday's overnight meltup has yet to take place, there is lots of time before the 3:30 pm ramp (although today's modest POMO of $1.25-$1.75 billion may dent the frothiness). Especially once the market recalls that the NOctaper FOMC 2-day meeting starts today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Dallas Fed Dumps From 19-Month High; Misses By Most In 6 Months





Last month was all ponies and unicorns as hope was extrapolated that a 19-month high in the Dallas Fed meant this time was different and not entirely cyclical as we have pointed out again and again. Once again it seems the government-budget-based hope has collapsed as even optimism for the future dropped to its lowest in 4 months. This is the biggest miss of expectations on six months and the lowest print in 5 months. Reflecting the margin pressures that we discussed previously, prices received dropped dramatically as price paid soared.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Picturing The Slow Rise And Quick Fall Of Fed Credibility





"There's no alternative in making monetary policy but to communicate as clearly as possible, and that's what we tried to do," is how Bernanke defended the Fed's actions over the last six months. But, as the WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath rather snarkily explains, the Fed's 'communications strategy' was a stumbling effort to let the public know what was going on as their efforts to telegraph strategy left investors confused at key points about where it was heading, and some misread Mr. Bernanke's intentions about the bond-buying program and interest rates.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Dallas Fed Soars To 20-Month High As Employment Stagnates





At 12.8, the Dallas Fed manufacturing survey printed at its highest since Feb 2012 - handily beating the 5.6 expectation. Driven by a surge in production and Capacity Utilization, the headline - as they all seem to do - shows some worrying sub-index movements. New Orders expanded at a slower pace for the 3rd month in a row, volume of shipments fell to a 4 month low, and employment-related indices were all weak (wages fell, number of employees fell, and average workweek fell). Even the outlook (six months ahead) fell back from last month's level.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Obamacare Enters Texas As Dallas Fed Employee Workweek Drops To 2009 Levels





11 of the 15 sub-indices for the Dallas Fed manufacturing outlook fell month-over-month with new orders, production, and finished goods notably weak. Of course, the modest headline beat will be all we hear about as the US economy makes 'progress'; but under the surface there is an even more concerning factor. While the number of employees rose modestly, the average employee workweek collapsed at its fastest pace in 2 years (and the last 2 months have dropped the most in 3 years) as it seems the Obamacare-effect smashes the workweek back to its lowest since October 2009.

 
testosteronepit's picture

When “QE Infinity” Turns Into A Pipedream: Hot Money Evaporates, Rout Follows – See Emerging Markets





The Fed and other central banks have accomplished a huge feat: a worldwide tsunami of hot money. Which is now receding.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

France: From The Sublime To The Ridiculous





France is the odd duck on the Continent. It is neither a petulant member of the Southern European financial disasters nor a member of the Northern European banner of austerity nations. France, as we discussed here and here, is the swing country in Europe. It waives about with the wind depending upon the subject. The bonds of France trade just behind those of Germany. While we are sure the portfolio managers on the Continent require diversification. Where the market is pricing French bonds now may turn out to be a rather serious mistake in judgment.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Not Even More Fake Chinese Data Can Push Futures Higher





The good, if fake, Chinese "data" releases continued for a second day in row, dominating the overnight headlines with a barrage that included CPI, PPI, retail sales, industrial production, fixed investment, money growth, car sales, and much more (summary recap below). Needless to say, all the data was just "good enough" or better than expected. Yet judging by both the Chinese market (which is barely up, following the drop on yesterday's "surge" in made up trade data) and the US futures, not even algos are dumb enough to fall for the goalseek function in China_economy.xls. Either that, or traders are taking the "rebound" in the Chinese economy as a further indication that the Taper (which will  take place in September), will take place in September. And since global risk sentiment continues to be driven by the USDJPY, the Yen pushing to overnight highs is not helping the "China is bullish" narrative.

 
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