Fitch

Global Stocks, Futures Continue Surge On Lingering Rate Hike Euphoria

Heading into the Fed's first "dovish" rate hike in nearly a decade, the consensus was two-fold: as a result of relentless telegraphing of the Fed's intentions, the hike is priced in, and it will be a "dovish" hike, with the Fed lowering its forecast for the number of hikes over the next year. Consensus was once again wrong on both accounts: first the rate hike was far more hawkish than most had expected (see previous post), and - judging by the surge in Asian, European stocks and US equity futures - the "market" simply is enamored with such hawkish hikes which will soon soak up trillions in liquidity from the financial system.

Frontrunning: December 15

  • Global stocks rise but oil, Fed keep investors nervous (Reuters)
  • Janet Yellen: An orthodox economist for unorthodox times (Reuters)
  • House Democrats Said to Be Open to Lifting Oil Export Ban (BBG)
  • Don't Count on an Oil Rally If U.S. Crude Export Ban Is Lifted (BBG)
  • Germany welcomes 34-state Islamic military alliance against terrorism (Reuters)
  • U.S. soldier Bergdahl may face life sentence in court-martial over desertion (Reuters)

Fitch Warns Of "Historic Junk Milestone" As US Defaults Surge

Despite the rear-view-mirror-gazing optimists proclamations that default rates have been low (which matters not one jot when pricing the future expectations of default into corporate bond cashflows), Fitch just released its forecast for 2016 defaults and notes that more than $5.5 billion of December defaults has increased the trailing 12-month default rate to 3.3% from 3% at the end of November, marking the 13th consecutive month that defaulted volume exceeded $1.5 billion, closing in on the 14-month run seen in 2008-2009.

Global Stocks Fall For First Time In Six Days As Commodity Rout Spills Over Into Stocks

As a result of the global commodity weakness, global stocks have fallen for the first time in six days as the sell-off in commodities continued, dragging both US equity futures and European stocks lower. However, putting this in context, last week the MSCI All Country World Index posted its biggest weekly gain in six weeks: alas, without a coincident rebound in commodity prices, it will be merely the latest dead cat bounce.

"This Isn't Going To End Well" - Junk Bonds Under Pressure

There are seemingly always “good reasons” why troubles in a sector of the credit markets are supposed to be ignored – or so people are telling us, every single time. Some still recall how the developing problems in the sub-prime sector of the mortgage credit market were greeted by officials and countless market observers in the beginning in 2007. Meanwhile, the foundation of the economy continues to look rotten (the newest round of Fed surveys has begun with another bomb and other manufacturing-related data continue to disappoint as well). This isn’t going to end well, if history is any guide.

Frontrunning: November 6

  • Dollar at three-month high as payrolls paralysis sets in (Reuters)
  • 5 Things to Watch in the October Jobs Report (WSJ)
  • China to Lift Ban on IPOs (WSJ)
  • ArcelorMittal Is Latest Victim of China's Steel-Export Glut (BBG)
  • 'Hope to see you again': China warship to U.S. destroyer after South China Sea patrol (Reuters)
  • Giants Tighten Grip on Internet Economy (WSJ)
  • Questions Surround Valeant CEO Pearson (WSJ)