GAAP

Apple Slides After Missing Revenue, China, ASPs Despite Better iPhone Sales, Guidance

Despite guiding notably higher for the holiday quarter, and beating modestly on EPS, AAPL just reported its third consecutive quarter of declining results and iPhone sales, and its first fiscal year of lower revenue since 2001. The market was not impressed, despite Tim Cook's strong guidance for the holiday quarter when AAPL expects to make as much as $78 billion.

Weekend Reading: Time To Be A Contrarian?

Currently, there is little argument the “bullish trend” remains intact. As such the mainstream analysis, if you can actually call it that, continues to the tout the inherent benefits of low cost, passive indexing and the ultimate “chase for yield.” However, it is here the real danger lies. Much of the monetary flows into passive indexes is actually NOT PASSIVE. When the eventual reversion comes, and it will, the pain inflicted on individuals, as is always the case, will turn “passive indexers” in “panicked sellers.”

This Is How Much Liquidity Deutsche Bank Has At This Moment, And What Happens Next

Following today's Deutsche Bank fireworks, Goldman reports that "crisis” questions are being asked: “is there risk of a financial crisis re-run” and “can a large European bank face a liquidity event”? To answer these questions we look at the total liquidity accessible to Deutsche Bank, and what are the options facing the bank next.

Nasdaq Turns Green After Intel Hikes Guidance Moments Before Market Open

With Deutsche Bank foundering, oil tumbling to lows not seen since August 11, and futures taking on water, a sticksave had to come from somewhere to avoid another Friday risk-parity fund deleveraging. We got just that moments ago courtesy of Intel, which announced just before the market open that Q2 revenue is expected to be above the company's previous outlook.

Time To Get Real, Part 2: "We Need Their Drugs"

On the current path, the world is experiencing the largest artificial asset allocation in modern history, one that is driven by a misguided interest rate regime that has lost its efficacy and is producing more harm than good. Yet the fear of withdrawal pain is keeping central bankers from doing the inevitable: Quit. The response is predictable: "I need the drugs!"

Deutsche Bank Calculates How Much Of The S&P's Value Is Due To Central Banks

If the ERP is responsible for 92% of the S&P500 move since 2012, or just over 800 points, that would imply that central bank policies are directly responsible for approximately 40% of the "value" in the market; any moves to undo this support could result in a drop that leaves the S&P in the neighborhood of ~1,400.