GAAP

Tyler Durden's picture

A Peek Beneath Tesla's Non-GAAP Hood Reveals Nothing But Cockroaches





Back in August, we joked that in the Tesla press-release the one most often used word was Non-GAAP (43 times). Conveniently, we provided a word cloud of the company's Q2 release for the visual learners to grasp just this. That TESLA's earnings were an epic non-GAAP adjustment joke was only further cemented by the fact that the company itself provided a bridge between its GAAP and Non-GAAP earnings.  Now, the euphoria is over and  the story is different, as not only has the company's self-reported and erroneous record of making the safest car in the world gone up in flames, but the momentum appears terminally broken and following today's most recent 11% drop, TSLA stock could soon be headed for double digit territory again. More importantly, however, the end of the momentum story means that those who care about such anachronisms as fundamentals can once again look beneath the hood of TSLA to get the true story of what is really going. There, with the help of Bloomberg's forensic accounting sleuth Jonathan Weil one uncovers nothing but cockroaches.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Unspoken, Festering Secret At The Heart Of Shadow Banking: "Self-Securitization" ... With Central Banks





The implication of this particular and quite unprecedented shadow banking circle jerk, which could very easily make even the direct wealth transfer resulting from trillions in QE pale by comparison, is so stunning that we leave it up to the reader to come to their own conclusion.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Would You Buy This Business?





 

 

I have a business I would like to sell you. Let’s run over the numbers first. First and foremost, I have to be honest, this business has not implemented a budget in five years. I know that seems like an insane way to run a business, but I can assure you that management is comprised of highly intelligent, ethical people.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Culture Of Ignorance - Part I





The kabuki theater that passes for governance in Washington D.C. reveals the profound level of ignorance shrouding this Empire of Debt in its prolonged death throes. Ignorance of facts; ignorance of math; ignorance of history; ignorance of reality; and ignorance of how ignorant we’ve become as a nation, have set us up for an epic fall. It’s almost as if we relish wallowing in our ignorance like a fat lazy sow in a mud hole. The lords of the manor are able to retain their power, control and huge ill-gotten riches because the government educated serfs are too ignorant to recognize the self-evident contradictions in the propaganda they are inundated with by state controlled media on a daily basis.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

IBM Craters To 2 Year Low On Massive Revenue Miss, Asia-Pac, BRIC Sales Both Plunge 15%





Judging by the plunge in IBM stock after hours (accounting for a major portion of the Dow Jones Non-industrial Average Index), the CFO can't pay shareholders with hopium and rumors. The reason: while IBM beat EPS modestly with a very adjusted bottom line of $3.99, beating estimates of $3.96, driven mostly by this: "IBM’s tax rate was 16.0 percent, down 8.6 points year over year" (assuming a flat tax rate Y/Y, GAAP EPS would plunge from $3.68 to $3.30), it was revenues - that ongoing 2013 horror story for the "stawk" and economic "recovery" - that was the problem, because instead of printing at $24.74 billion where it was expected, sales missed by a whopping $1 billion, or $23.72 billion. Of note: while America revenues of $10.3 billion dropped just 1%, and Europe was actually up 1%, it was the all important China and Japan, i.e. Asia-Pacific, where revenues cratered by an unprecedented 15%! So much for both Abenomics and the Chinese "recovery." And what's worse, the Emerging Market callamity of Q3 finally took a big bite: "Revenues in the BRIC countries — Brazil, Russia, India and China — were down 15 percent." Time to push the global recovery myth to the 4th half of 2013 (the third half is where the government shutdown will be squeezed).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Great Tesla Rotation: From Institutions To Retail Bag-Holders





Two months ago we were the first to highlight the 'real' great rotation in US equity markets as so-called "professionals" were selling in size as "retail" was the big buyer. Since then, market breadth has been weaker and the new highs are made on the back of fewer and fewer supposed "cult" stocks (as Cramer so aptly put it before Lumber Liquidators started to crumble). Perhaps the most infamous of the "cult" stocks is TSLA. At twice the market cap of Fiat, needing to sell 537,815 cars to meet expectations, and the gap in GAAP, Tesla closed at all-time highs on Friday. So who is buying?

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Blackberry Reports Negative 24% Gross Margin





 
Tyler Durden's picture

BlackBerRIP: BBRY Plummets Over 20% On Friday Afternoon Early Earnings Debacle





UPDATE: BBRY opens and trades down to $8.06 - all-time lows -21%

Having risen phoenix-like off the lows in July, it seems Blackberry is echoing the Eastman Kodaks of the world. Releasing its earnings early, the results are dramatically worse than expected:

BLACKBERRY 2Q PRELIM. REV. $1.6B, EST. $3.03B
BLACKBERRY CUTTING 4,500 JOBS
BLACKBERRY TO CUT OPER EXPENDITURES BY ABOUT 50% BY END 1Q '15

The last bullet point is great news: think of all the cash that will go toward dividends and stock buybacks...

 
rcwhalen's picture

Are Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Really Profitable? Really?





Not only does FNM seem to be unprofitable under the new FHFA guidance, but payments made to Treasury might need to be reversed. 

 
EB's picture

Ebeling: Insolvency at the Fed | Baker: Parasitic FIRE Economy





Richard Ebeling on Fed insolvency (technically, it's a nolo due to non-GAAP accounting gimmicks).  And, Dean Baker demonizes your favorite False Profits[/Prophets?]: Greenspan, Bernanke and...Summers.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

SEC Warns: Prepare For Repo Defaults





As we warned here most recently, the shadow-banking system remains the most crisis-catalyzing part of the markets currently as collateral shortages (and capital inadequacy) continue to grow as concerns. In recent weeks, between The Fed, Basel III, and the FDIC, regulators have signalled the possible intent to change risk, netting, and capital rules that could have dramatic implications on the repo markets and now, it seems, the SEC has begun to recognize just how big a concern that could be. As Reuters reports, the SEC urged funds and advisers last week to review master repurchase agreement documentation to see if there are any procedures to handle defaults, and if necessary, prepare draft templates in advance. A retrenchment in repo markets is unwelcome news for the liquidity of the underlying securities and the impact on the derivative portfolios should not be underestimated.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

What Lies In Store For Second Half Earnings





The chart below lays out what lies in store (no pun intended) second half earnings as indicated by companies themselves.  What it shows is that optimism in corporate earnings (ignoring the persistent optimism in the economy which always without fail, leaves everyone disappointed despite the fifth ongoing year of QE) is once again misplaced and that EPS are set to disappoint, especially if the stock buyback wave - certainly not facilitated by the rise in interest rates - is finally over.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Global Markets React To Detroit, Tech Stumble





With little going on today besides the just reported GE earnings, which beat consensus EPS expectations of $0.35 by the smallest possible increment but, as expected, missed consensus revenue of $35.56 printing at $35.12, and both the Japanese (which experienced a 500 point drop in minutes overnight) and Chinese (which closed below 2000 again) markets sliding, it is perhaps better to summarize the day that just was: Detroit City files for bankruptcy (send in Detroika!), Moody's take the US off negative outlook, Google and Microsoft miss on earnings and the S&P 500 hits a new record high. As DB says, the above certainly made for an eventful close to the US session after what was a fairly dull second day of testimony and Q&A for Bernanke. He has said all that can be said for now and we're left waiting for the data. And the earnings data so far has been abysmal if mostly on the top line, with corporate revenues now assured to double dip and decline for the second quarter in a row. And if the tech bellwethers all of which have been major disappointments to date and have guided down, are an indication of what is coming, Q3 may and will be even worse.

 
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