Howard Marks

The Billionaire Bears Club

"The next crisis won’t start in the equity market, or even the high yield bond market. The next crisis will occur when Central Banks lose control of sovereign bond markets. I know that is exactly the opposite advice that the Billionaire Bears Club boys are giving you, but I don’t mind being on the other side of their trade... Economic weakness will just mean more printing, it is economic strength that should worry the equity bulls."

Weekend Reading: On A Cliff's Edge

"...Unfortunately, in the financial markets, irrationality historically prevails and very few investors survive the fall..."

Gartman Stakes His Reputation That "The Bull Market Has Come To An End"

"We are indeed fearful… very… that this wondrous bull market that began in the spring of ‘09 has come to an end and we do not make this statement lightly for we know the damage that can be done to an already damaged reputation if this statement proves to be wrong."

Why One Trader Thinks The "S&P 500 Just Topped Out For The Summer"

Summer market dynamics lend weight to the theory that the S&P 500 may have put in a multi-week high on Tuesday. The index’s price-to-book ratio is at its highest level since 2003. Yes, it’s been up here since June and it was way more elevated from 1996 to 2002, but it now matters because the mood has suddenly turned.

Bull Hopes, Bear Signals

“There is nothing riskier than the widespread perception that there is no risk.”

Earnings Beat "Fist Pumps" Very Muted This Quarter

"...shares of companies that have reported both better-than-expected profits and sales for the second quarter have barely budged this earnings season. It’s the least fist-bumping investors have done for great quarters in 17 years."

Bears Throw In The Towel: FANG Shorts Hit All Time Low

The FANG bears have capitulated: short interest for the four companies has sunk to a new record low, and collectively the short bets against FANG stocks accounted for just 2% of their traded shares, an all time low.

Netflix Is Spending Twice As Much As Amazon On Content

To continue its growth, Netflix will have to spend some $8.7 billion in cash on new content, nearly $2 billion more than it did in 2016, and more than double what its nearest, and cash flow positive competitor, Amazon, is spending on new content.