Japan

Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events In The Coming "Most Impotant Jobs Report Ever" Week





June is off with a bang, and a very busy week in the macro economic calendar, both globally and in the US, which culminates with the latest "most important ever" payrolls report, one which will surely be closely watched by a Fed which may hike as soon as a few weeks from now (but probably won't).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Flat With Greece In The Spotlight; China Boomerangs Higher





Remember China's 6% crash last week? It is now a distant memory made even more remote thanks to the latest batch of ugly data out of China, coupled with hints of even more liquidity injections, which led to the latest surge in the Shcomp, an index that has put most pennystocks to shame. In Europe, the big story remains Greece, and as everyone expected, the doomed country and its creditors failed to make a deal on Sunday. This is after Greek Officials were said to have prepared a draft agreement, which was expected to be announced on Sunday. Not helping things, Greek PM Tsipras came out in fully defiant mode and accused bailout monitors of making “absurd” demands and seeking to impose “harsh punishment” on Athens. A bunch of final PMI number showed a modest improvement in the periphery at the expense of Germany whose deterioration is starting to be a concern.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abenomics Fail: Japanese Slack-Jawed At Oral Sex Price Deflation





Despite proclamations by Kuroda, Abe, and various other elected (and unelected) officials that the 'deflation mindset' is gone from Japan, it appears one segment of the population is keenly aware of the ongoing deflationary market for one staple item. Just as we warned was occurring in America, it appears the cost of blow-jobs has gone from just-plain-cheap to "well, why not?" As one intrepid reporter ventured into the Otsuka red-light district of Toshima Ward discovered, the fee for an oral session at a “pink salon” starts as low as 2,000 yen ($16!).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The 10 Most Important Themes To Watch This Summer





Here are Deutsche Bank's 10 themes and "summer issues" to keep an eye on as we leave May behind and enter June...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

And Now The Bull's Turn: Jeremy Siegel Explains "No Way There Is A Bubble, No Signs Of Recession"





Having detailed the less status-quo-sustaining side of things, thanks to some frankness from Nobel Prize winner Robert Shiller, who warned "unlike 1929, this time everything - Stocks, Bonds and Housing - is overvalued," we thought it only fair-and-balanced to illustrate the alternative perspective and who better than Jeremy Siegel to deliver it. In his anti-thesis of Shiller's facts, Siegel unleashes textbook dogma to pronounce, "in no way do current levels quality as a bubble", that stock returns should remain supported by fundamentals, there is no sign of a recession in the next 18 months, The Dow's fair-value currently is 20,000, and "not much" could dissuade him from holding stocks.

 
Eugen Bohm-Bawerk's picture

Why the Fed will change its exit strategy…again





What happens if the Fed actually stop reinvesting TSY holdings after they reach lift-off? Net supply will on the private market will increase accordingly and market volatility will force the FOMC to reassess their fleeting exit strategy...again

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Are All Central Bankers Idiots?





You can’t build a solid economy on the jelly of unaffordable housing, unpayable debts, and unsustainable asset prices. But that’s what we’ve got. The only way to get down to something more reliable... more real... and healthier... is to wash away the financial glop and goo that has accumulated during the last 30 years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How US And China Can Avoid A War (Spoiler Alert: The US Won't Like It)





To avoid a violent militaristic clash with China, or another cold war rivalry, the United States should pursue a simple solution: give up its empire.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

In Denial: We Pursue Endless Growth At Our Peril





Humans desperately need a new story to live by. The old one is increasingly dysfunctional and rather obviously headed for either a quite dismal or possibly disastrous future. One of the chief impediments to recognizing the dysfunction of the old story and adopting a new one is the most powerful of all human emotional states: Denial. But here we are, 40 years after the Club of Rome and 7 years after the Great Financial Accident of 2008, collectively pretending that neither was a sign warning of the dangers we face -- as a global society -- if we continue our unsustainable policies and practices that assume perpetual growth.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

A Generation Of Rate-Hike Rookies Makes Jeff Gundlach Nervous





Rates have been so low for so long, that many of the traders who will be on the front lines if and when the Fed ever does decide to start down the long path to normalizing policy have never, in their professional careers, seen a rate hike. “The experience that many investment operations have with rising rates for most of us is very low for some it’s nonexistent," Jeff Gundlach warns.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

GDP Report Confirms Global Trade Is Crashing, And Why That Is Good News For Some





We did not actually need confirmation that global trade is slowing to a crawl (and has in fact reversed): after all, we have been showing just that for the past year, most recently earlier this week but it is important to note that in today's negative GDP print, it was net trade (exports less imports) that subtracted -1.9% from the final GDP print, driven by a -1.03% annualized drop in exports. This was the biggest hit to US trade since thegreat financial crisis.

 
GoldCore's picture

Goldman Sachs Warns “Too Much Debt” Threatens World Economy





Goldman Sachs proposes that society should bend to the needs of the financial and monetary system rather than reform of that system. At any rate, the proposals put forward by them are unlikely to achieve any kind of long-term solution to the problem of massive unsustainable debt faced by the western world and Japan. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Japan's Unemployment Rate Dropped Even As 280,000 People Lost Their Jobs





Yesterday Japan amazed everyone when it reported that its unemployment rate had dropped yet again, this time to 3.3%, the lowest since April 1997. The paradox is that while the number of Japan's unemployed dropped by 20,000, the number of those employed plunged by 280,000! Or as Goldman calls, it "growth in jobholders looks to have peaked amid a lack of recovery momentum in the economy"

 
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