Japan

"Renormalization" Is Dead: The Market Is Pricing Just One Rate Hike Over Next 3 Years

Rates shock: market now pricing only one Fed hike over next 3 years. As bond yields in Europe and Japan hit new historical lows this week, the US 10y yield fell to a 4-year low, just 20bps above its 2012 historical lows. This followed a weak payrolls report, Brexit uncertainty, the beginning of the ECB’s corporate bond buying program and a very dovish June FOMC meeting which significantly cut rate forecasts in the out years. 

This Is What The Coming "Bond Shock" Will Look Like

The only thing that can halt the tsunami of bond buying, would be a Bond Shock, an event that is certain to take place, the only question is when. As BofA points out, the relentless chasing after government paper will change "if Quantitative Failure spreads from Europe & Japan to the US."  Here's how to time it and what it would look like.

Japan: A Future Of Stagnation

Take a declining population with declining rates of productivity growth and load it up with debt, and you get a triple-whammy recipe for permanent stagnation. There are Degrowth strategies that make sense because they're designed to be sustainable, but first the systems that have been designed to fail - Keynesian stimulus policies and the banking system - must be allowed to fail.

"The Fed Has Failed" - A Disturbing New Warning From Bank Of America

"Central banks have lost the “War against Deflation”. They have failed to stimulate animal spirits depressed by the 4D’s of excess Debt, financial Deleveraging, aging Demographics and technological Disruption. This changes if Quantitative Failure spreads from Europe & Japan to the US. A rise in US bank CDS and/or a dive in assets related to consumer & housing credit would be very negative for global asset prices in our view. Note the new whispers of a peak in the US consumer credit cycle which, if true, at a time of zero rates in an $18 trillion, consumer-led economy would be concerning."

Global Stocks Rebound As Brexit Odds Decline Following Tragic Death Of UK Lawmaker

While it may very well not last and all of yesterday's gains could evaporate instantly if the Brexit vote is set to take place as scheduled, all 10 industry groups in the MSCI All-Country World Index advanced, with the index rising 0.7% trimming the week’s drop 1.6%. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index rose 1.4%. Futures on the S&P 500 were little changed, after equities Thursday snapped their longest losing streak since February. . Oil rose, paring its biggest weekly decline in more than two months. Bond yields around the globe fell.

The Last Castle To Fall: Can The Narratives Behind The S&P's Resilience Be Sustained

In the last few years, several markets/asset classes have shown signs of weakness, if not outright implosion: EU banks, EU stocks, Base Metals, Energy Commodities, Japan stocks, EM stocks and currencies. The bubble built in them by the excess liquidity provided by Central banks, as they were busy fighting structural deflationary trends (and crowding the private sector out of bonds), has deflated in most parts of the market, except two: US equity and G10 Real Estate.

Will Brexit Give The US Negative Interest Rates?

One of the oddest things in this increasingly odd world is the spread of negative interest rates everywhere but in the US. One answer is that the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank are buying up all the high-quality (and increasing amounts of low-quality) debt in their territories, thus forcing down rates, while the US Fed has stopped its own bond buying program. The other answer is that this is just one of those periodic anomalies that persist for a while and then get arbitraged away. And Brexit might be the catalyst for that phase change.

European Peripheral Bond Risk Explodes: Forget Brexit, "Now It's Italy's Turn"

If there was any doubt that Brexit was "relevant" then the surges in European peripheral bond risk, despite massive bond-buying by The ECB, should send shivers up and down the status quo huggers that are shrugging the referendum decision off because "central banks will provide liquidity." However, it's not just The UK that EU officials need to worry about, as The Globalist notes, Germany will have to change its policies if it wants to avoid exit of other countries from the eurozone.

Global Stocks Continue To Plunge As Central Banks Disappoint, Brexit Looms

Futures on the S&P 500 slipped 0.3%, as U.S. equities are on track to extend losses for a sixth day.  Europe's Stoxx 600 fell to a four-month low, sliding 1% for its sixth decline in seven days, and U.S. crude retreated for a sixth day in the longest losing streak since February. Bond yields sank to records in Germany, Australia after Japan as Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said next week’s U.K. vote on European Union membership was a factor in the decision to hold interest rates steady. The Yen surged more than 2% as the Bank of Japan refrained from adding any new stimulus,

USDJPY, Nikkei Plunge As BoJ Disappoints With "No Change"

While only 5 of 40 economists expected a rate cut and only 7 of 39 any additional easing, hopes were rife for some additional ETF buying or hints at further stock purchasing by The Bank of Japan... but no. USDJPY immediatley plunged to a 104 handle and Nikkei 225 crashed 300 points.