• Marc To Market
    10/03/2015 - 09:57
    The poor jobs report weighed on the dollar, but the greenback recovered as the session progressed.  It is not clear the jobs report was a game changer.  Stay tuned.  


Tyler Durden's picture

The Rise And Fall Of Great Powers

The key dynamic here is once the low-hanging fruit have all been plucked, it becomes much more difficult to achieve high growth rates. That cycle is speeding up, it seems; western nations took 100 years to rapidly industrialize and then slip into failed models of stagnation; Japan took only 40 years to cycle through to stagnation, and now China has picked the low-hanging fruit and reverted to financialization, diminishing returns and rapidly rising debt after a mere 30 years of rapid growth.... there is another dangerous dynamic in any systemic reform: the very attempt to reform an unstable, diminishing-return system often precipitates its collapse. The leadership recognizes the need for systemic reform, but changing anything causes the house of cards to collapse in a heap. This seems to describe the endgame in the USSR, where Gorbachev's relatively modest reforms unraveled the entire empire.

Marc To Market's picture

Greenback Finishes Q2 on Firm Footing, What Next?

Near-term outlook for the major currencies discussed and a brief analysis of the short-coming of fair-value "discounting" models in understanding recent price action.  

Tyler Durden's picture

Venezuela Is The "New Killing It", And It Doesn't Even Print

As the following chart from Perpe showing June performance, who needs money printing when one can generate gobs of "wealth effect" simply by centrally-planning the destruction of their economy, crushing the currency, and living constantly on the edge of a banana republic military coup. Presenting Venezuela: + 40.7% in June and +144% YTD... the occasional toilet paper shortage notwithstanding. Truly the shape of "wealth effects" to come.

Tyler Durden's picture

The Days Of The Super-Powered Chinese Economy Are Over

Last week's liquidity crunch and market panic is a reminder that Beijing is playing a difficult game. Regardless of what happens next, the consensus expectations that China's economy will grow at roughly 7 percent over the next few years can be safely ignored. Growth driven by consumption, instead of trade and investment, is alone sufficient to grow China's GDP by 3 to 4 percent annually. But it is not clear that consumption can be sustained if investment growth levels are sharply reduced. If Beijing can successfully manage the employment consequences of decreased investment growth, perhaps it can keep consumption growing at current levels. But that's a tricky proposition. It's likely that the days of the super-powered Chinese economy are over. Instead, Beijing must content itself with grinding its way through the debt that has accumulated over the past decade.

EconMatters's picture

Oil is the Next Major Commodity to Crash

The real question is when will the Feral Hogs fix their sights on the WTI market, and take it down to $80 like they have the last two years. My guess now that they have had their fun with the Gold and Silver markets, they will start looking around for their next target.

Tyler Durden's picture

More Fed Jawboning On Deck To Usher Green Close To First Half Of 2013

Overnight newsflow (which nowadays has zero impact on markets which only care what Ben Bernanke had for dinner) started in Japan where factory orders were reported to have risen the most since December 2011, retail sales climbed, the unemployment rate rose modestly, consumer prices stayed flat compared to a year ago, however real spending plunged -1.6% significantly below the market consensus forecast for +1.3% yoy, marking the first yoy decline in five months. This suggests that households are cutting utility costs more so than the level of increase in prices. By contrast, real spending on clothing and footwear grew sharply by 6.9% yoy (+0.6% in April) marking positive growth for a fourth consecutive month. Simply said, the Japanese reflation continues to be limited by the lack of wage growth even as utility and energy prices are exploding and limiting the potential for core inflation across the board.

George Washington's picture

Radiation Levels Skyrocket at Fukushima

The Accident Is NOT Contained

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 27

  • Hilsenrising interest rates Business Feels Pinch of Swift Rate Rise (WSJ)
  • Yellen Betting Defies 100-Year Jinx of Fed No. 2 Never Elevated (BBG)
  • No sign of cyber leaker Snowden on flight to Cuba (Reuters)
  • Back to the Future 2 is finally coming: Honda Sees ‘Flying Sports Car’ Making Profit by Decade’s End (BBG)
  • Europe’s Richest Person Kamprad to Move Back to Sweden (BBG)
  • Li’s Shock Treatment to China Lenders Evokes Ex-Reformer (BBG)
  • In India, Gold-Related Shares Melt Down (WSJ)
  • Citigroup Opens in Iraq to Tap $1 Trillion of Oil Spending (BBG)
  • France warned on budget deficit  (FT)
Tyler Durden's picture

Peter Schiff On Japan's "Sock Puppet Kabuki" Market

The Japanese stereotype of excessive courtesy is being confirmed by the actions of prime minster Shinzo Abe who is giving the world a free and timely lesson on the dangers of overly accommodative monetary policy. Whether or not we benefit from the tutorial (Japan will surely not) depends on our ability to understand what is currently happening there. This time around investors in the Japanese market were similarly deluded by fairy tales. Leading economists told them that Japan could cheapen its currency to improve trade, use inflation to create real growth, increase prices to encourage spending, and drastically increase inflation without raising interest rates. In short, monetary policy was seen as substitute for an actual economy.

Tyler Durden's picture

8 Ways That Young People Are Getting The Shaft... And What To Do About It

It should be obvious by now that the old adage– study hard, get good grades, go to a good school, get a great job, and work your way up the ladder– really doesn’t apply anymore. And it’s time to re-invent the model. Based on the eight reasons below, it’s no wonder they call them the “Boomerang Generation”, and that 45% of college grads aged 18-24 in the United States were still living with Mom and Dad...

Tyler Durden's picture

Hugh Hendry: "The Invisible Regime... Has Become Unhinged"

"This year we have pursued five macro themes: long the US dollar, short China, long Japanese equities, long low variance equities and long interest rate contracts at the short end of G10 fixed income markets... The invisible regime of low volatility and low correlations that had been so supportive of risk markets for at least the last year started to become unhinged."

Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Europe's Precarious Banks Will Determine The Future

It is easy to get the impression that the naysayers are wrong on Europe. After all the predictions of Armageddon, ten-year government bond yields for Spain and Italy fell to the 4% level, France which is retreating into old-fashioned socialism was able to borrow at about 2%, and one of the best performing bond investments has been until recently – wait for it – Greek government bonds! Admittedly, bond yields have risen from those lows, but so have they everywhere. It is clear when one stands back from all the usual euro-rhetoric that as a threat to the global financial system it is a case of panic over. Well, no. Europe has not recapitalized its banking system the way the US has (at great taxpayer expense, of course). Therefore, it is much more vulnerable. Where European governments and regulators have failed to make their banks more secure it is because they tied their strategy to growth arising from an economic recovery that has failed to materialize. The reality is that the Eurozone GDP levels are only being supported at the moment by the consumption of savings; in orther words, the consumption of personal wealth. Wealth that is not infinite; and held by those not likely to tolerate footing the bill for much longer.

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 26

  • Scalpel in Hand, Chinese Premier Li Stirs Reform Hopes (Reuters)
  • Obama Sets Conditions for Keystone Pipeline Go-Ahead (FT)
  • World’s Most Indebted Households Face Rate Pain (BBG)
  • SAC Probers Weighing 'Willful Blindness' Tack (WSJ)
  • Draghi Says ECB Ready to Act, Calls for Investment Over Tax (BBG)
  • U.S. Tops China for Foreign Investment (WSJ)
  • Basel Presses Ahead With Plans to Limit Bank Borrowing (FT)
  • Gillard Ousted as Australia PM by Rival Rudd (FT)
  • Japan Economic Strength Will Show in Stocks, Nishimura Says (BBG)
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