MACD

Tyler Durden's picture

A Brief Note On The Difference Between Trading And Investing





Investing in oneself and enterprises one actively controls may now be the only legitimate deployment of capital that qualifies as an investment in the traditional sense - that is, capital isn't being risked in rigged gambling halls and Ponzi schemes.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is This Decline The Real Deal?





Is this stock market decline the "real deal"? (that is, the start of a serious correction of 10% or more) Or is it just another garden-variety dip in the long-running Bull market? Let’s start by looking for extremes that tend to mark the tops in Bull markets.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

NASDAQ: Classic Head-and-Shoulders & Blow-Off Top?





If the advance from January 2013 to the top in early 2014 isn't a blow-off top, it's certainly a pretty good imitation of one. If the NASDAQ surpasses the high of 4,371 and moves higher, the head and shoulders pattern is negated. If the NAZ fails to rally to new highs, that could be a signal that the rally from 2009 is reversing or has entered a new phase.

 
Sprout Money's picture

How High Will Gold Stocks Fly?





Expect a wild ride...

 
Marc To Market's picture

Dollar Powers Ahead





Overview of the dollar's outlook against the major currencies, without a preconceived notion that the US is in some kind of terminal decline.  

 
Marc To Market's picture

Euro and Sterling to New Highs?





Technical outlook for the several of the most actively traded currencies.  

 
Marc To Market's picture

FX: Position Adjustment or Trend Reversal ?





The recent strength of the euro and sterling seemed to evaporate, while the yen and dollar-bloc currencies recovered.  Is this a major trend change or was it simply reflecting some position adjustment in a thin market? 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hey, Is It A Problem That We're All On One Side Of The Boat?





It may appear to be safe for everyone to be on the same side of the boat, but the gunwale is awfully close to the water.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Gold Fails To Obey Script





Selling both the rumor and the news turns out not to work... but we cannot yet say whether a trend change is definitely in the bag. However, considering how absolutely dismal sentiment on gold is, considering the many similarities to the 2008 'retest' that could be observed recently (back then, gold was also declared 'dead' by the mainstream) and given the fact that for a change, the gold market has not acted in the way that was widely expected, it continues to make sense to look for more signs of a trend change to emerge. Ideally declines should continue to be kept in check by support at $1275, while any rally that manages to exceed the $1350 level on a closing basis and confirmed by the gold stock indexes can probably be interpreted as a sign that the short to medium term trend has finally reversed for good.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

4 Bearish Divergences For "Different This Time" Believers





As stocks press back towards all-time highs amid a US government shutdown, extreme weakness in earnings pre-announcements, slower-than-expected China growth, Europe's recovery in doubt, and a looming debt-ceiling debate in the US, we look at four 'big picture' charts of dismal divergences that suggest it's not different this time at all...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

One More "The Status Quo Is Saved" Rally and Then...?





We can safely predict the inevitable budget-debt ceiling deal will spark yet another "the Status Quo is saved" rally in the stock market. But what happens after that?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Why Oil Could Move Higher... Much Higher





The conventional wisdom of the moment is that a weakening global economy will push the cost of commodities such as oil down as demand stagnates. This makes perfect sense in terms of physical supply and demand, but this ignores the consequences of financial demand and capital flows. The total financial wealth sloshing around the world is approximately $160 trillion. If some relatively modest percentage of this money enters the commodity sector (and more specifically, oil) as a low-risk opportunity, this flow would drive the price of oil higher on its own, regardless of end-user demand and deflationary forces. If we grasp that financial demand is equivalent to end-user demand, we understand why oil could climb to $125/barrel or even higher despite a physical surplus.

 
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