Merrill Lynch

BofA Fined $12.5 Million For Creating At Least 15 Mini "Flash Crashes"

The SEC announced that BofA/Merrill Lynch agreed to pay a $12.5 million penalty for "maintaining ineffective trading controls" that failed to prevent erroneous orders from being sent to the markets and causing at least 15 mini-flash crashes between 2012 and 2014.

Bob Farrell's (Illustrated) 10-Investment Rules

Regardless of how many times we discuss these issues, quote successful investors, or warn of the dangers – the response from both individuals and investment professionals is always the same... “I am a long term, fundamental value, investor.  So these rules don’t really apply to me.” No, you’re not. Yes, they do. Individuals are long term investors only as long as the markets are rising.

Traders Return From Vacation To Find S&P Futures Flat, Oil And Dollar Lower, Amid Flurry Of M&A

The return from summer holidays has started in much the same way as we left off August, with another subdued session that has seen European stocks little changed, Asian shares advance and S&P futures are modestly in the green amid a flurry of M&A. The US dollar weakened, with the Bloomberg Dollar Index down 0.2% for the 2nd day in a row as prospects for a U.S. interest-rate hike this month remained subdued.

The U.S. Economy: Bad Moon Rising

As for the incredible realm, one explanation is that the Fed is scared stiff it has nothing left in its toolbox to combat the next recession. Few major downturns have begun with the fed funds rate so perilously close to zero. The ultimate Catch 22 is that the flatness of the yield curve makes any fantasy of a Fed rate hike all too real for a dead breed the world once knew as ‘bond market vigilantes.’ It’s altogether possible that one more hike would be all it takes to invert the yield curve. The rest, as history has never failed to repeat, would be just that – history.

BofA Looks At The "What If" Scenario For Bonds: Find A Surprising Result

One of the big fears among the bond market, where most participants now openly admit there is a "bubble in credit", is that an unwind in global bond yields would lead to substantial losses.  To test this assumption, Bank of America's Ralf Preusser looks at the "what if" scenario, namely what would happen to total returns should government yields fully reverse their 30 year historical evolution. What he finds is surprising.