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Tyler Durden's picture

Here We Go Again: State Department Issues New Worldwide Terrorist Threat Alert





The last time the State Department issued a comparable worldwide terror alert, the majority of US embassies in the Muslim world were promptly evacuated and a few weeks later the Syrian false flag affair was unleashed upon the world. One wonders just what provocation John Kerry has in mind this time.

STATE DEPT ISSUES NEW WORLWIDE CAUTION ON TERRORIST THREATS; STATE DEPT DETAILS POSSIBLE THREATS IN EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA

At least the evil terrorizers have not infiltrated the Arctic circle yet. As for the always convenient scapegoat:

STATE DEPT SAYS AL-QAEDA PLOTTING IN MULTIPLE REGIONS

They sure are: mostly in Syria, but luckily they are now armed with US weapons.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Friday (Un)Humor: iMorons





Amid the media furore over 'lines' of people outside Apple Stores in New York City, we thought this 3-minute clip was a useful reflection of just who it is that feels the need to do this. As Jim Quinn notes, it is "three minutes that will crush any illusions you might have of the masses rising up." ... "we are, like, just, like, everyone, waiting on, like, line for Apple phone 5, like."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

CFTC Seeks Admission Of Market Manipulation From JPM; Jamie Balks





Even as JPMorgan seems set to put its London Whale troubles behind it with a nearly $1 billion imminent settlement, while at the same time throwing two mid-level traders at NY prosecutors and washing its hands of the whole tempest in a teapot affair, a curious snag has appeared. The CFTC, which in the past has never had a problem with promptly settling any market manipulation abuse with any bank in exchange for a small cash-greased slap on the hand, is suddenly a sticking point in JPM's ability to just walk away from the biggest prop trading Snafu in history. As WSJ reports, "the CFTC is focusing on the bank's increasingly aggressive trades made over several months early last year, when it added tens of billions of dollars to its derivatives positions—contracts tied to investment-grade corporate bonds, these people say. The CFTC is likely to use new powers granted by the Dodd-Frank law that allow it to charge firms for recklessly manipulating markets, say people familiar with the agency's thinking."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Washington Shooting Suspect Was HP Contractor Upgrading Navy, Marine Equipment





As more details emerge about today's suspected Washington Naval Base shooter, we find something else curious. AFP reports that Aaron Alexis had been working as a defense IT subcontractor for computer giant Hewlett Packard, according company officials said. Aaron Alexis, a former naval reservist, had been employed by a firm working on an HP contract to upgrade equipment used by the US Navy and Marine Corps, HP spokesman Michael Thacker said in an email. "Aaron Alexis was an employee of a company called 'The Experts,' a subcontractor to an HP Enterprise Services contract to refresh equipment used on the Navy Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) network."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Strippers Deserve Minimum Wage, Judge Finds





As the AFL-CIO blows off Obamacare, it seems unions have been hard at work in recent days. In a ruling on Tuesday, current and former 'dancers' from the tastefully decorated (from what we hear) Midtown Manhattan Rick's Cabaret have won a class-action suit that protects them under labor laws and entitles them to minimum wage at least. The club, having argued unsuccessfully that the strippers were independent contractors, plans to appeal the Judge's ruling that the dancers are 'the main attraction" and integral to it success (though personally we would only go there to read the articles). Whether this will raise (or lower) the price per dance, VIP room access fees, mark-ups on beer and bottles of vodka, or acceptance (or not) of EBT cards has yet to be made clear.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Money Laundering Exposed As A Key Component Of The Housing Bubble's "All Cash" Bid





In August 2012, when isolating one of the various reasons for the latest housing bubble, we suggested that a primary catalyst for the price surge in the ultra-luxury housing segment and the seemingly endless supply of "all cash" buyers (standing at an unprecedented 60% of all buyers lately as reported by Goldman) is a very simple one: crime. Or rather, the use of US real estate as a means to launder illegal offshore-procured money. We also identified the one key permissive feature which allowed this: the National Association of Realtors' exemption from Anti-Money Laundering provisions. In other words, all a foreign oligarch - who may or may not have used chemical weapons in their past: all depends on how recently they took their picture with the Secretary of State - had to do to buy a $47 million Florida house, was to get the actual cash to the US. Well good thing there are private jets whose cargo is never checked. It appears that a year later this too hypothesis has been proven. Earlier today the Post reported that "U.S. authorities announced Tuesday that they are seeking forfeiture of pricey Manhattan real estate linked to a fraud they say was uncovered by a whistleblowing Russian lawyer before he died behind bars. A civil forfeiture complaint filed against the assets of a Cyprus-based real estate corporation and other holding companies alleges that some of the proceeds from the $230 million tax fraud in Russia were laundered through the purchase of four luxury condominiums located in a Wall Street doorman building and two commercial spaces in prime locations in midtown and Chelsea."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

JPM May Be Parting Ways With Blythe Masters





It is somewhat ironic that none other than CNBC is reporting the news (which was suggested here months ago in "Will JPMorgan's "Enron" Be The End Of Blythe Masters?") that as part of its divestment of its physical commodities unit announced previously, JPMorgan may also seek to cover up any trace of market manipulation in the division recently embroiled in the aluminum cartel scandal (which we reported on in June 2011 and which story recently rose to prominence as a result of follow up reporting by the NYT) by getting rid of none other than Blythe Masters.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Visualizing The (High) Cost Of Living In New York City





The South Texas city of Harlingen is the cheapest place in the U.S. to live, according to the sixth annual cost of living index, a study conducted by the Council for Community and Economic Research. By contrast, the cost of living in Manhattan, one of the most expensive places to live in the world, is almost three times that of Harlingen. If someone with an annual income of $60,000 in Manhattan moved to Harlingen, she’d need to make just $21,768 a year to maintain her standard of living.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fast-Food Workers Of The World, Unite: The McStrike Epidemic Spreads, Coming To A City Near You





A month ago we reported that US fast food workers in several US cities, namely New York City, Chicago, St. Louis, Detroit, Milwaukee, Kansas City, Mo., and Flint, Mich., walked out Monday in a one-day strike demanding a doubling of their pay. Not unexpectedly, even though the president himself has been a strong proponent of rising the minimum wage, the corporations balked and the strikers achieved nothing and just in case there is some confusion, there is a lot of minimum skills, minimum wage applicants (not to mention robots) out there which translates into two words for the strikers: no leverage. However, these concepts may be foreign to a fast-food labor force that probably just wants a day out in the nice weather and to take a break from hard work for a change.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

New York, Miami and New Orleans to Flood





A study carried out recently by Nature Climate Change took a look at and analyzed past and present floods in the world and was able to predict the future floods that will take place concerning 136 cities.

 
williambanzai7's picture

I HaVe a DReAM (Slight Return)





A government that is operating under the credo "by the corporation for the corporation",  rather than "by the people for the people." 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 21





  • Obamacare, tepid U.S. growth fuel part-time hiring (Reuters)
  • Cameron was behind UK attempt to halt Snowden reports (Reuters), Britain defends detention of journalist's partner (Reuters)
  • Goldman Options Error Shows Peril Persists One Year After Knight (BBG)
  • China expresses 'shock' as Japan's nuclear crisis deepens  (Reuters)
  • Inquiry into China insurance firm rattles industry (Caixin)
  • Cheaper rivals eat into Apple’s China tablet share (FT)
  • Exporting fast food: Subway Targets Europe With as Many as 1,000 New Outlets in 2014 (BBG)
  • Reserve Bank of India boosts liquidity to ease pressure on banks (FT)
  • Justice Department Plans New Crisis-Related Cases (WSJ) - Holder doing his cutest attempt to pretend the TBTProsecute aren't
  • Syrian Opposition Alleges Gas Attack, Which Government Denies (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

JPMorgan Is Selling The Building That Houses Its Gold Vault





On the surface, there is nothing spectacular about the weekend news that JPMorgan is seeking to sell its 1 Chase Manhattan Plaza office building. After all, the former headquarters of Chase Manhattan Bank, located deep in the heart of the financial district and which was built by its then chairman David Rockefeller, is a remnant to another time - a time when banking was about providing loans, not about managing and trading assets which has become the realm of Midtown New York, and since JPM already has extensive Midtown exposure with its offices at 270, 270 and 245 Park, the 1 CMP building always stood out as a bit of a sore thumb. Of course, as Zero Hedge readers first learned, the big surprise is literally below the surface, some 90 feet below street level to be exact, where the formerly secret JPM gold vault is located, which also happens to be the biggest commercial gold vault in the world.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

US Judge Says Bloomberg's "Stop-And-Frisk" Policy Is Unconstitutional, Accuses "Highest Officials" Of Discrimination





In a shocking twist for the New Normal, a US judge has actually upheld the constitution...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

This "Yellow" Asset Is The Best Performer Of The Past Year (Hint: Not Gold)





The best returning asset class traded in the NY Metro area is yellow but doesn't change hands on Wall Street. As ConvergEx's Nick Colas notes, over the last 12 months New York City taxi medallions have risen 49% in price, besting the relatively humdrum returns of the S&P 500 (up 21%), the NASDAQ (22%) and the Dow (18%).  Medallions – essentially the right to operate a for-hail taxi in New York City – now trade for as much as $1.3 million, an all-time record.    Part of this dynamic is fixed supply – there are just 13,336 medallions available for a city of 8.3 million people.  There is also a macroeconomic point, with a stronger NYC economy for those inhabitants who can afford the service.  The more surprising observation, however, is that new technology in the form of in-car credit card machines and more recently smartphone hailing apps both materially increase the value of owning a medallion.  In a world where every technology is deemed “Disruptive”, here’s a case where the status quo has actually reaped much of the reward.

 
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