Paul Weiss

Puerto Rico Bonds Plunge After Senate Passes Debt Moratorium Bill

The ongoing feud between Puerto Rico and its mostly hedge fund creditors is promptly shaping up as the next "Argentina", where "vulture investors" may well end up holding the island commonwealth hostage for years, during which time, however, they won't get paid. This is shaping up as the latest development in the saga in which earlier today Puerto Rico’s Senate approved a bill calling for a moratorium on a wide range of debt payments, including general-obligation bonds, through January 2017 in what Bloomberg dubbed "the latest escalation of the Caribbean island’s fiscal crisis."

Frontrunning: April 4

  • Ties between Germany and Russia enter new chill (Reuters)
  • Tax authorities begin probes into some people named in Panama Papers leak (Reuters)
  • SEC investigates ex-JPMorgan debt traders (FT)
  • Who Will Win Wisconsin? Here Are Six Credible Predictions (BBG)
  • Victim in Wall St. Scheme Was a Classmate of Its Accused Architect (NYT)

HFT Pays: CEO Of Firm That Accounts For 5% Of US Equity Volume Selling His NY Mansion For $114 Million

Everyone knows that the most parasitic form of trading, that would be high frequency trading for those who may not have followed this website since 2009, is very profitable. Well, it is certainly profitable for those who operate the momentum-igniting, quote churning, HFT firms in control of what's left of the "market", if not so much for anyone else. Just how profitable is it? Judging by the house that Vincent Viola, head of Virtu Financial, one of the largest high frequency electronic trading and market making firms, which according to Cifu accounts for more than 5% of US equities volume and over 10% of the of the average daily volume of MSFT, and which tried to expand even more aggressively with a failed bid for Knight Capital last year, has just put on the block.

SEC Revolving Door Leads To $5 Million Payday For Former Chief Enforcer

The name Robert Khuzami is well-known to Zero Hedge readers: the former top SEC enforcer is perhaps best known not for what he did (judging by how many Wall Street bank executives ended up in jail following the Great Financial Crisis, very little), but for what he didn't - namely pursue any action against his former employer, Deutsche Bank, where he was a general counsel and where under his watch Greg Lippmann was "shorting your house." The reason, among others, extensive deferred comp linked to DB stock as we reported all the way back in May 2010. But Bob didn't care about what he did, or didn't do at the SEC - he was much more interested in what he would do after he left the regulator, which he did in January of this year. Because Bob, courtesy of his DB days, realized the massive paycheck potential of a revolving door job at the head of the government's enforcement unit. Sure enough, as the NYT reports, he has capitalized on just that following a $5 million a year contract (with a 2 year guarantee) with legal behemoth Kirkland & Ellis where he will be a partner and "will represent some of the same corporations that the S.E.C. oversees."

Who Is In And Who Is Out In Obama's Second Term Cabinet

Tim Geithner's time is almost done, but the former NY Fed head is only one of very many whose position is expected to be replaced in Obama's second term (just so there is a non-continuous chain of command if and when the time comes for the people to demand an explanation for the state of the US economy from the talented Mr. Geithner). Who else is out and who is expected to be in? The following list attempts to cover all upcoming rotations at the top of the US cabinet. What is not attempted is a prediction of where in the private sector people such as Geithner will end up: that is considered largely self-explanatory.

Another GM Ad Hoc Bondholder Joins Informal Committee

Paul, Weiss has been successful in canvassing GM bondholders, and has gotten another major player to split from the Ad Hocs and join the informal committee. Western Asset Management has decided to join Franklin Templeton, Marathon, JMG, and Eastbourne, who as Zero Hedge disclosed, represent roughly 6% of the unsecured bonds.

First Splinter Bondholder Committee Formed In GM Bankruptcy

In the first bondholder splinter group in the GM bankruptcy, today Paul Weiss filed a statement under rule 2019, creating an informal group of bondholders. The four initial members hold $1.6 billion face in notes, and were previously members of the HLHZ-advised ad hoc committee, which was instrumental in attaining to the highly questionable 54% of plan supporters.

GGP's Future To Be Decided By Three Bondholders

As Zero Hedge wrote, GGP may be forced to file for bankruptcy next Tuesday unless its proposed consent solicitation passes, which is contingent on the acceptance of 90% of its 2009 bondholders and 75% of the holders of 2012-13 notes. However, the blocking power on the deal lies with any combination of just three bondholders, as the deal changes material maturity and coupon terms.