Portugal

Europe: The Substitution Of A Population

In one generation, Europe will be unrecognizable. Eastern Europe now has "the largest population loss in modern history", while Germany overtook Japan by having the world's lowest birth rate. Europe, as it is aging, no longer renews its generations, and instead welcomes massive numbers of migrants from the Middle East, Africa and Asia, who are going to replace the native Europeans, and who are bringing cultures with radically different values.

Is Portugal The Next "Shoe To Drop" In Europe?

Portugal 10-year yields imply that investors are starting to get a little worried about an October ratings decision that could make Portugal the EU's next big bailout candidate.

Who's Going To Pick Up The UK Tab?

A large part of the reason why the UK had to be such a significant net contributor was that most EU members couldn’t scrape up their “fair share.” Who’s going to pick up the tab when that flow of revenue ends?

S&P Futures Unchanged As Europe Rises; Dollar Slide Sends Oil Above $47

In the latest quiet trading session, European shares rose while Asian stocks fell and S&P futures were little changed. Minutes of the Fed’s last meeting damped prospects for a U.S. interest-rate hike, sending the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index doen 0.3%, approaching a three-month low. Dollar weakness continues to buoy commodities, with the Bloomberg Commodity Index set for the most enduring rally in more than two months, as WTI flirted with $47

Portuguese Bonds Slump As Last-Investment-Grade-Standing Falters

The only thing standing between Portugal's insanely decoupled low bond yields and the ugly fundamental reality is a BBB rating from DBRS which enables The ECB to keep buying the nation's bonds. The problem is, pressure is mounting on DBRS (the only 1 of 4 raters to maintain Portugal as investment grade) to drop the hammer... and Portuguese risk is rising.

Europe Has Two Options: Revolution Or Elections

European leaders have responded to new challenges in this post-war era with old solutions. Chief among them is the forced integration of Europe into a single political and economic construct. There are two options when an “unelected mafia” has seized control: elections and revolution. The Brits opted for an election. What if Italy, Portugal, and/or the Netherlands do the same, with the same outcome?

Portugal Gaining On Italy In The European Banking "Doom Loop"

Portugal’s doom loop metric has soared over the past two years.  Portuguese banks have been gorging on Portuguese sovereign debt, taking it from 7 percent of total assets to 10 percent - the same level as Spain.  If they continuing loading up at this pace, they will reach Italian levels by 2018.

A Post Western World? A Disturbing Interview With Prof. Harry Redner - Part 2

The political and economic issues broadly discussed in the media usually revolve around political cycles, terrorism, foreign policy, rising debt levels, sluggish economic performance, academic underachievement, environmental problems, ageing demographics and so forth. In our view, this all ties into a major cycle of history that has been with us for some time, and which has been gaining traction since the 1990s: the end of "Western Civilization" and the transition towards a globalized society.

World Stocks Drop For Third Day On Growing Concerns About Central Bank Policy, Tumbling Oil

After 7 consecutive drops in the Dow Jones, the Industrial average is set for an 8th decline with US equity futures modestly lower in the premarket as risk-averse sentiment persists overnight. Oil’s continued slide and recent plunge into a bear market, despite some stabilization this morning just south of $40, has finally rekindled global growth concerns, and is keeping a lid on bullishness. European stocks are little changed, while Asian stocks and S&P futures fall.

The End Of IMF Credibility (Or Why Christine Lagarde Should Be Fired... But Won't Be)

The IMF’s Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) issued a report a few days ago entitled ‘The IMF and the Crises in Greece, Ireland, and Portugal’. It is so damning for managing director Christine Lagarde and her closest associates, that it’s hard to see, certainly at first blush, how they could all keep their jobs. But don’t be surprised if that is exactly what will happen. Because organizations like the IMF don’t care much, if at all, about accountability. Their leaders think they are close to untouchable, at least as long as they have the ‘blessing’ of those whose interests they serve.