Portugal

US Futures, European Stocks Rebound, Bonds Fall Ahead Of US Data Deluge

The overnight session started with more weakness out of Asia, where chatter that the BOJ may end up doing nothing despite all the trial balloons (as we hinted yesterday), sent the USDJPY sliding, pushing the Nikkei lower, leading to a 7th consecutive decline in the Topix, the longest such stretch since 2014 even though the BOJ is now actively buying a record amount of ETFs. However, the modest dip in S&P futures and European stocks proved too much for BTFD algos, and risk promptly rebounded.

At Least Three People Killed After Passenger Train Derails In Northern Spain

At least three people were killed and dozens injured after a passenger train derailed near O Porrino in Galicia province in northern Spain, BBC reports, citing authorities. The Portuguese driver of the train was among the fatalities. About 60 passengers were on the Portuguese train when it derailed at 09:30 (07:30 GMT) near the town's station, El Pais added.

Doug Casey On Why You Shouldn't Take This Election Seriously

"...Trump is the desperate “last hurrah” of the old order. I don’t support Trump per se, even though, given the alternative, I hope he wins. It’s clear he has all kinds of dangerous authoritarian tendencies. And has all kinds of really silly economic notions. But the good news is that he may - to at least a degree - upset the Deep State’s apple cart, at least until he’s co-opted into the Deep State. No matter who wins, this election is going to be ugly. So try not to take it very seriously..."

"All Eyes On Central Banks" In September, But "No Reason To Smile"

September will be quite a busy month for investors since there are around 30 major central banks meetings scheduled. Since the Bank of England’s last policy announcement, the total monthly amount in global official quantitative easing has reached almost $200 billion, which corresponds, for the purpose of comparison, to Portugal’s annual GDP in 2015. Long-rumoured and oft-discussed, QE infinity is now a reality.

Europe: The Substitution Of A Population

In one generation, Europe will be unrecognizable. Eastern Europe now has "the largest population loss in modern history", while Germany overtook Japan by having the world's lowest birth rate. Europe, as it is aging, no longer renews its generations, and instead welcomes massive numbers of migrants from the Middle East, Africa and Asia, who are going to replace the native Europeans, and who are bringing cultures with radically different values.

Is Portugal The Next "Shoe To Drop" In Europe?

Portugal 10-year yields imply that investors are starting to get a little worried about an October ratings decision that could make Portugal the EU's next big bailout candidate.

Who's Going To Pick Up The UK Tab?

A large part of the reason why the UK had to be such a significant net contributor was that most EU members couldn’t scrape up their “fair share.” Who’s going to pick up the tab when that flow of revenue ends?

S&P Futures Unchanged As Europe Rises; Dollar Slide Sends Oil Above $47

In the latest quiet trading session, European shares rose while Asian stocks fell and S&P futures were little changed. Minutes of the Fed’s last meeting damped prospects for a U.S. interest-rate hike, sending the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index doen 0.3%, approaching a three-month low. Dollar weakness continues to buoy commodities, with the Bloomberg Commodity Index set for the most enduring rally in more than two months, as WTI flirted with $47

Portuguese Bonds Slump As Last-Investment-Grade-Standing Falters

The only thing standing between Portugal's insanely decoupled low bond yields and the ugly fundamental reality is a BBB rating from DBRS which enables The ECB to keep buying the nation's bonds. The problem is, pressure is mounting on DBRS (the only 1 of 4 raters to maintain Portugal as investment grade) to drop the hammer... and Portuguese risk is rising.

Europe Has Two Options: Revolution Or Elections

European leaders have responded to new challenges in this post-war era with old solutions. Chief among them is the forced integration of Europe into a single political and economic construct. There are two options when an “unelected mafia” has seized control: elections and revolution. The Brits opted for an election. What if Italy, Portugal, and/or the Netherlands do the same, with the same outcome?