• williambanzai7
    09/16/2014 - 12:16
    I have tons of good stuff to post, but this morning I'm feeling something like this...

Auto Sales

Tyler Durden's picture

Santelli Rants On The Looming Auto Subprime-Loan Crisis





With interest rates rising and now clearly weighing on the housing recovery (and affordability, as we noted earlier), many look at the extreme jumps in auto sales being pumped out today and worry that higher rates will impact that credit-fueled orgasm of optimism. While house price appreciation and belief in its linear extrapolation seemed to have prompted an inordinate amount of fed-funded credit-based car sales in the last month, the fact is that rates won't 'directly' affect car-buyers, since as CNBC's Rick Santelli exclaims, auto-loan rates are massively high already with millions paying high double-digit rates and terms are now as long at 97 months!! Simply put, with incomes stagnating, should we see any marginal impact on ability-to-pay or credit-availability (which will be affected by higher rates weighing on funding abilities - see below), then as Santelli concludes, watch out for these little words... "Auto Sub-prime loans."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bank Of America: "We Hope None Of These Three Shocks Reaches A Crisis Level"





"In the spring, the risks to growth seemed to be fading. The economy was weathering the fiscal shock. Politicians decided to delay battles over the budget and the debt ceiling, passing a continuing resolution to fund the budget through September and postponing the debt ceiling drop-dead date to some time in the fall. Meanwhile, financial markets in Europe had settled down, the European economy showed signs of improvement, and commodity prices were stable. In their June directive the FOMC made it official: “The Committee sees the downside risks to the outlook for the economy and the labor market as having diminished since the fall.” Unfortunately, we seem to be entering another of those periods of elevated risk. Three concerns are emerging."

- Bank of America

 
Tyler Durden's picture

It's The Consumer, Stupid!





Early-year tax increases and higher gasoline prices have probably dented U.S. consumer expenditures and as Bloomberg's Joseph Brusuelas notes, tomorrow's report of July’s personal income and spending report may illustrate the weakness that poses a significant risk to the much-anticipated economic growth renaissance in the second half of the year.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 2





  • Low Wages Work Against Jobs Optimism (WSJ)
  • Tourre’s Junior Staff Defense Seen Leading to Trial Loss (BBG)
  • Russia gives Snowden asylum, Obama-Putin summit in doubt (Reuters)
  • Fortress to Blackstone Say Now Is Time to Sell on Surge (BBG)
  • Brazil backs IMF aid for Greece and recalls representative (FT), previously Brazil refused to back new IMF aid for Greece, says billions at risk (Reuters)
  • Google unveils latest challenger to iPhone (FT)
  • Swaps Probe Finds Banks Manipulated Rate at Expense of Retirees (BBG)
  • Academics square up in fight for Fed (FT)
  • Potash Turmoil Threatens England’s First Mine in Forty Years (BBG)
  • Dell Deal Close but Not Final (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Car Sales Miss Expectations Across The Board





While much is being made of the ISM smash this morning and China's 'official' PMI overnight, it seems cognitive dissonance is on the rise as China's 'other' PMI collapsed and US Construction Spending dropped precipitously. It was only a month ago that ISM was sub-50 and that housing (and construction spending) was set to lift us out of the growth-scare. Apparently not. But there is another pillar of this recovery that has been stalwart during the equity market rally - that of US auto sales... until now...

*FORD U.S. VEHICLE SALES UP 11%, EST. UP 17%
*GM JULY U.S. VEHICLE SALES RISE 16%, EST. UP 20%
*CHRYSLER JULY U.S. VEHICLE SALES UP 11%, EST. UP 16%

It seems that all that channel-stuffing, subprime-lending, term-extending has hit its peak as, despite smiles and being 'pleased', US auto companies are underperforming expectations (as Ferrari exceeds).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Market Issues In The Coming Week





After a slow start in the week, there is a substantial pick up with announcements from the FOMC, ECB and BOE (as well as monetary policy updates from the RBI, RBA, Israel, and Czech Republic) with the possibility, if not probability, of a Fed update on tapering expectations. On Wednesday we get the much expected wholesale GDP revision which will boost "growth data" all the way back to 1929 and is expected to push current GDP as much as 3% higher, and on Friday is the "most important NFP payroll number" (at least since the last one, and before the next one), where the consensus expects a +183K print, and 7.5% unemployment. All this while earnings season comes to a close.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Fundamental Keys in the Week Ahead





Dis-passionate discussion of next week's events and data, placed within a somewhat larger context.  

 
Marc To Market's picture

FX: Fundamentals Dominate in Week Ahead





A brief discussion of the technical condition of the major currencies going to what is a week packed with fundamental developments.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Detroit By The Numbers





With the Detroit bankruptcy hearing under way (constitutional crises notwithstanding), we thought it useful to cut through the rhetoric, break-down the mutally-assured-destruction barriers, and peer into the cold-hard facts as the city looks to restructure its $18 billion in debt.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Half a Dozen Thoughts about Next Week





Overview of the investment climate.  

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Death Of A City: Detroit's Eulogy As Delivered By Kevyn Orr





"For years, the City has spent more than it takes in and has borrowed and deferred paying certain obligations to make ends meet. The City is insolvent" - Kevin Orr

 
Marc To Market's picture

Why the US and European Auto Sectors Continue to Diverge





Some thoughts on why US auto sales are at their strongest pace since prior to the crisis, while EU auto sales are at 20 year lows.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman Joins JPM In Cutting Q2 GDP To 1% Stall Speed; A "Funny Chart" Becomes Funnier





Last week it was JPM just somewhat contradicting Jamie Dimon's "kid gloves" CNBC infomercial, when it slashed its Q1 GDP forecast from 2% to 1% (and about to be revised to sub-stall speed). Today, following the latest retail sales unadjusted disaster, it is Goldman's turn to slash its Q2 GDP tracking estimate from 1.3% to 1.0%. Stall speed has arrived despite everyone's forecasts for the this time it's different glorious US economic renaissance (so far "deferred" each year since 2010).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 11





  • Bernanke Supports Continuing Stimulus Amid Debate Over QE (BBG)
  • Portugal president wants 'salvation' deal, including opposition (Reuters)
  • Egypt has less than two months imported wheat left - ex-minister (Reuters)
  • A rise in long-term interest rates is creating challenges and opportunities for the largest U.S. banks. (WSJ)
  • BoJ says Japanese economy is ‘recovering’ (FT)
  • More Chinese cities likely to curb auto sales (Reuters)
  • PC Shipments Fall for 5th Quarter (BBG)
  • Property Crushes Hedge Funds in Alternative Markets (BBG)
  • New aid gives Greece summer respite before showdown (Reuters)
  • Rajoy Punishes Exporters Sustaining Spain’s Economy (BBG)
 
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