Shocking Footage Shows Crowd Of Hungry Venezuelans Slaughtering A Cow In The Open

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s plan to order markets to slash prices of food - an attempt to combat speculation and rampant inflation of the bolivar - has apparently backfired as mobs of hungry Venezuelans have started looting supermarkets and slaughtering cattle in the open to survive, Reuters  reports.

Last week, we reported on near-riots that broke out in Caracas after the mandatory price cuts for food stoked widespread shortages as what little inventory that remained on market shelves quickly disappeared.

Venezuelans are suffering from a plethora of economic and social maladies.Four years of recession and an inflation rate approaching 4,000% by some measures have made the country’s currency practically worthless. Widespread shortages of food and medicine led to violent riots during the spring and early summer of 2017 that resulted in more than 100 deaths, including the burning alive of one suspected Maduro supporter by a crowd of citizens. Law enforcement in the capital and many of the country’s smaller cities has effectively disbanded, leading to a rise in lynchings and streets justice. Indeed, suspected thieves are sometimes killed.

Venezuela’s regime probably would’ve collapsed by now if it weren’t for the aide of Russia and China, which have lent the Maduro regime money in exchange for a discount on future oil deliveries. But now that the price of oil is finally climbing again, Maduro could find himself rescued by commodity markets. In apparent anticipation of higher oil prices, the administration announced late last year that it would finally introduce "the Petro” - a state-designed cryptocurrency that will help Venezuela’s customers pay for their goods while circumventing the petrodollar system.

In a shocking example of just how severe Venezuela’s food shortages have become, a video on social media showed roughly a dozen men running into a lush pasture, chasing a cow, and then apparently beating it to death for the meat.

 

 

"They're hunting. The people are hungry!" says the narrator of the video, who filmed the incident from his car. Lawmaker Paparoni said some 300 animals were believed to have been killed, though this hasn’t been independently confirmed.

 

Venezuela

Violent lootings and hijackings - long a staple of life for Venezuela’s remaining merchants - are also growing increasingly common.

Zuley Urdaneta, a 50 year-old vet in Merida, witnessed the looting of a truck along the highway around 2 pm Thursday afternoon, she told Reuters. About two hours later, he said some 800 people converged on a food collection center and proceeded to plunder it.

"They knocked down the gates and looted flour, rice, cooking oil, cooking gas," said Urdaneta. "The police and the National Guard tried to control the situation by giving out what was left."

Despite the grinding poverty and widespread social unrest that has challenged the last vestiges of Chavismo, Maduro has effectively sidelined his opposition while brutally suppressing popular uprisings.

"What we're living is barbaric," said opposition lawmaker Juan Guaido in a tweet referencing the slaughter the cattle. "The dehumanizing regime of Nicolas Maduro is turning a blind eye to the tragedy that we Venezuelans are living."

In a rare interview with western media published earlier this week, Maduro repeated his claim that the country’s economic collapse is the result of a conspiracy between his domestic political opponents and foreign powers like the CIA trying to foment an uprising and overturn what they perceive to be a hostile leftist regime.

The irony here, of course, is that the US and Venezuela had for years maintained a relatively peaceful and lucrative commercial relationship, evidenced by the success of Venezuela’s US subsidiary, Citgo. Even when former leader Hugo Chavez spewed anti-US rhetoric, he was behind the scenes cooperating with his purported imperialist foe.

Still, with supermarket shelves perennially empty and Treasury Department sanctions choking the regime off from the dollar-based global financial system, one can't help but wonder how much longer Maduro can hang on before an outright rebellion erupts.

 

Comments

erkme73 Billy the Poet Jan 12, 2018 9:25 PM Permalink

Anyone who thinks this can't happen in the states is delusional.  People who are starving lose any shred of civility, and return to pure barbaric methods to survive.   I WAS living in a master-planned community in FL, in a gated subdivision with over 1000 homes.  Now, I live in middle-TN where the closest neighbor is more than a mile away - and Walmart is a 2 hour round-trip drive.

If it never happens in the US, I'm still living in God's country.  If it does, I'll serve up an extra helping of popcorn as the rest of the world eats itself.

In reply to by Billy the Poet

chiaroscuro _ConanTheLiber… Jan 13, 2018 10:56 AM Permalink

Who are you to tell other people never to donate to charity? The organization in Joe Trader's link does teach people how to farm and support them in learning to take care of themselves: https://www.crs.org/our-work-overseas/program-areas/agriculture

Of course, there's not much point in teaching Venezuelans how to farm at a time when people are so desperate they're beating cattle with clubs. So it sounds like CRS is focusing more on emergency food and medical services there right now. 

Speaking as someone who has visited third world countries to help people personally I can tell you it's not generally the most efficient approach. 

In reply to by _ConanTheLiber…

chiaroscuro Socratic Dog Jan 14, 2018 12:31 AM Permalink

I used to think the same thing. But I recently listened to a lecture on draft animal use in developing nations hoping to learn something from the wisdom of those who had been farming this way for thousands of years. I was surprised to learn that in some of the poorest nations on earth (in Africa and Southeast Asia) where people rely heavily on draft animal power, the locals hadn't even really figured out how to tame their animals. Instead the locals would simply capture semi-feral cattle once a year around planting time, strap logs on their necks (the crudest, most primitive form of a yoke which would cause the animal pain and reduce efficiency) and struggle to control it as it plodded through their fields. They wouldn't use draft animals for any other tasks throughout the rest of the year or make any effort to work with or train them to prepare them for plowing. In one country the design for a plow had not changed in thousands of years. Basically, agriculture in these locations never even made it to the level of sophistication that agriculture in the Western world progressed to hundreds if not thousands of years ago. Some of this knowledge gap was attributed to people migrating from war torn areas and loosing touch with the ancestral understanding of how to farm their land. Some of it seemed to simply be a long history of lack of motivation to innovate. 

In reply to by Socratic Dog

JohnGaltUk erkme73 Jan 13, 2018 6:14 AM Permalink

I lived in the London area and saw what happened when their was civil unrest. Things can break down fairly quickly so I moved to a more rural area, I am close to water, can see cows out my window and the whole area grow primary produce.

If there is a bond apocalypse this could easily happen as supply chains break down all round the world.

In reply to by erkme73

OverTheHedge JohnGaltUk Jan 13, 2018 7:51 AM Permalink

The overpopulation of the UK means instant starvation for everyone. Scottish Highlands might be OK, and perhaps a few insular farming communities around Dartmoor, but for the rest - too many IT professionals and shoe-shop salespeople, and not enough farmers, gardeners, growers etc, Far too many huge conurbations, which will empty out into the surrounding countryside like a plague of locusts. All resources, livestock etc will be gone in a month.

If the government keeps control, then the mass die-offs might be kept in the cities, but frankly, I don't see that being an option.

Oh, I forgot Wales. The Welsh will be fine. Fewer sheep, but other than that, fine.

In reply to by JohnGaltUk

Farqued Up waterwitch Jan 13, 2018 11:31 AM Permalink

Nah, they still have to go to the next stage of moving out of their cushy urban living and cut down the trees to cook those giant Anacondas and giant rats. For variety they can cut up a cat for Pirhhana bait, they bite well I hear.

Truth be known, I suspect there are no problems outside the cities that are lording over the captive converted Marxists. They’re on the Equator with 2 growing seasons, have the most oil and gas of any country, and as soon as their brains reject the Marxists and Church Pied Piper bullshit, they will kill their oppressors that have told them that the billionaire Castro was the man with the plan to shuck the evil Yanqui oppressors.

In reply to by waterwitch

Sudden Debt HisNameIsRP Jan 12, 2018 9:35 PM Permalink

you might not have noticed in the video but there are miles and miles and miles of farmland

not being used...

 

I don't pitty the Venezuelans, they do it to themselves just like many are doing it to themselves in america and Europe.

When the shit hits the fan, leave the country.

 

Those morons can leave the country. No problem! They're just to stupid to do so.

In reply to by HisNameIsRP

Lore Hubbs Jan 12, 2018 10:24 PM Permalink

Exactly -- Just like in those shitholes South Africa and Kenya, where they stole the land from white farmers, committed all manner of atrocities, and left only marauders and jungle.  I have a friend who knew it was time to leave back in the 80s when he found himself fearing for the safety of his family and wouldn't let them leave the house without armed escort. 

Meanwhile, Soros-sponsored injection of thousands of shithole migrants into western countries continues unabated.

This shit is going to spread. Really, it is already, for those with eyes to see. 

(A shame about that cow.  You'd think somebody in that rabble would at least know how to do the job humanely, but then, that would be expecting humanity, wouldn't it?)

In reply to by Hubbs