"Time To Switch Hands" - Pro-Trump Candidate Kim Klacik Says Liberals Ruined Baltimore 

Baltimore congressional candidate Kimberly Klacik could be the next face of the Republican Party - and if she wins a Congressional seat on Nov. 3, it would be the first time in more than fifty years Republicans controlled Maryland's 7th District. 

Klacik's popularity exploded after President Trump shared her campaign video on Twitter, which criticized the Democratic leadership of Baltimore City with a huge African American population (see: here & here). She even appeared at the Republican National Convention and made several television appearances, raising $6.5 million from Jul. 1 through Sept. 30.

Here's the video Trump re-tweeted that pushed Klacik into the spotlight: 

"...and black people don't have to vote Democrat," Klacik said in the short video. 

Klacik is running for late Rep. Elijah Cummings' old seat in a race against Rep. Kweisi Mfume. She routinely accuses Democrats in Baltimore of abandoning the black community. Most of her fame comes from videos of her speaking to the camera as she walks the poorest and most dangerous neighborhoods of the city, or maybe even the country, littered with abandoned homes, dormant factories, and opioid clinics. 

The District is a Democratic stronghold, and her opponent, Mfume, recently declined to debate Klacik on local television. So broadcaster Fox 45-Baltimore, owned by Sinclair Broadcast Group., decided to hold a conversation with the young black Republican candidate. 

At the beginning of the conversation, Klacik told Fox 45's Kai Jackson: "Democrats have controlled the Baltimore City area for 53 years;" expanding on that idea, she said it's time to "switch hands," referring to the possibility she can win the district seat to usher in a new era of Republican control. 

The video ends with Klacik outlining how Baltimore County residents are too scared to visit the city because decades of failed Democratic leadership has resulted in surging violent crime, out of control homicides, and an opioid crisis that has decimated the area. These are all things we've discussed over the years about imploding Baltimore (see: here & here & here). 

"Why not do more in the city so we can all enjoy Baltimore like we used to," Klacik said. 

Klacik is not alone - other black republicans have launched political campaigns in Democratic cities across the country in the hopes of winning a seat in Congress. 

If she wins, Klacik will have an uphill battle, it could take at least a decade before real changes are seen. Just imagine how much work is ahead after fifty years of failed liberal policies.