China Demands US Stop Meddling In Its Affairs, Wants Acceptance As World Power, Issues Thinly Veiled Threat

Tyler Durden's picture

It has been a while since political bickering over who can piss the farthest was an issue of global concern. Today, China communist party's mouthpiece People's Daily has released an essay in which the country once again resorts to thinly veiled threats against the US, and demands that not only the country's territorial demands in the South China Sea be uncontested, but that the US accept China as a global power , as the alternative could promptly generate the appearance of rocky relations between the two countries and "no one would like to see the negative
effects rocky relations would bring to China, the United States and
possibly to the world as a whole." Of course, with China the world's biggest creditor nation, and holder of anywhere between $800 billion and $1.2 trillion (assuming all that London flotsam is really Chinese stealth accumulation), Beijing can rest assured the essay has been duly noted. Of course, with the administration doing one wrong thing after another, it would not be at all surprising if the president's advisory henchmen seek to push the tenous relationship as far as it can go, and truly test the decoupling (this time it IS different, Jim O'Neill said so) hypothesis, however with nothing but downside if decoupling is finally proven true (breath holding not advised).

From People's Daily:

The U.S. government has repeatedly made
it clear that it would welcome China’s entrance into the world arena as
a power. However, a series of issues since the beginning of this year,
particularly Washington's stance on the U.S.-South Korean joint
military exercises and the South China Sea issue, have made the world
think: Is the United States ready to recognize China as a power on the
world stage?

It is easier said than done for the United States
to adapt itself to China's development. Lip service is far from enough
to boost the development of Sino-U.S. relations. If Washington cannot
find a way to recognize and accept China's peaceful rise onto the world
stage, bilateral ties will be like a roller coaster full of ups and
downs. However, no one would like to see the negative effects rocky
relations would bring to China, the United States and possibly to the
world as a whole.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has
urged China to play a greater role in solving the world's economic,
environmental and political problems. She said global issues could not
be solved by the United States or China alone, but without
participation of the two countries, no problems would likely be solved.
Washington has realized that the United States’ global interest can be
maintained only through changing the way it deals with China.

The
Obama administration released positive signals in its relations with
China, which have been interpreted as the United States showing its
intention to change the traditional strategy of engagement and
containment. As a matter of fact, the general direction of Sino-U.S.
relations provides a foundation on which the United States can base its
foreign policies and is more complicated than an adjustment in real
conditions. Issues such as arms sales to Taiwan, Google censorship, RMB
exchange rates as well as finger-pointing about economic responsibility
show Washington still seems confused and inpatient about relations with
China.

The relationship between China and the United States is
the most important and complicated bilateral relationship in the world
this century. The development of Sino-U.S. relations will affect world
peace and stability, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. Ian
Bremmer, an American political scientist specializing in U.S. foreign
policy, said, "America and China will have more than ever to gain from
closer political and commercial ties, and must take steps to avoid a
Cold War, or worse."

In that circumstance, the United States
needs both wisdom and determination to recognize and accept China, a
country that is totally different from its own, as a power on the world
stage.