Chinese Imports Surge To Record $152 Billion In March Despite "Weak" Yuan As $140 Million Trade Surplus Posted

Tyler Durden's picture

Despite relentless calls that the Chinese currency is undervalued, and that it really is China's fault that Brent is nearly at $130, in March the world's fastest growing economy posted an import number of $152 billion: an absolutely monthly record. Still, this was almost precisely offset by total exports which at $152.2 billion represent the third highest monthly total ever (following only November and December of 2010), and leading to a trade surplus of $140 million, in essence implying that the CNY is rather correctly priced (at least per the Politburo's calculations of imports and exports). This is substantially stronger than the consensus which was looking for a trade deficit of $3.35 billion in March, arguing that following February trade deficit which came at a multi year high, in part blamed on the Chinese New Year, the country is once again in aggressive inventory restocking mode. A detailed look at China's two main trade partners, the US and EU, shows that exports to the US surged back to $25.1 billion from $15.8 billion in February, while imports from the US were $12.1 billion. Yet despite a strong euro, it is the EU that exported a record amount of goods to China in March: an all time high of $19 billion. Still, this was more than offset by $28.5 billion in imports from China for a trade surplus of $9.5 billion with the European Union. Ironically, it was the Rest of the World (excluding the US, EU, Japan, ASEAN, Korea, Hong Kong, Australia and Taiwan) which benefited the most, after it exported a record amount of goods to China, or $53.9 billion in March. At least someone (who actually has worthwhile goods to export) is seeing their economy grow, regardless of just how undervalued, or fairly priced, the CNY may be.

Total Chinese monthly imports and exports:

Monthly trade with key international partners:

China US:

China EU:

And China - ROW:

Read more at Bloomberg