Is CNBC Filtering Any Reference To Zero Hedge?

Marla Singer's picture

From our tips line:

I am sure you have probably seen this before, but I found some interesting differences in the article by Matthew Goldstein as posted at http://blogs.reuters.com/commentaries/2009/07/05/a-goldman-trading-scandal/ and the article as posted on cnbc, http://www.cnbc.com/id/31750907.
 
From Reuters:

 

The case against Aleynikov may explain why the New York Stock Exchange moved quickly in the past week to stop reporting program stock trading for its most active firms. Goldman often was at the top of the chart–far ahead of its competitors.

On the week ending June 19, Goldman was ranked first on the NYSE program trading list. But on the week of June 22, Goldman mysteriously didn’t appear on the list of the top 15 firms at all. It simply vanished without any explanation. Then the NYSE stopped reporting the numbers. The Zerohedge blog was all over this controversy a week ago.

And now Tyler Durden of ZeroHedge has come in with his own excellent analysis of this strange, strange criminal case. I highly recommend reading it.

 

It’s possible Goldman asked the NYSE to stop reporting the number after it discovered that someone may have infiltrated the proprietary computer codes it uses.

 

From CNBC:

 

The case against Aleynikov may explain why the New York Stock Exchange moved quickly last week to stop reporting program stock trading for its most active firms. Goldman was often at the top of the chart — far ahead of its competitors.

It's possible Goldman had asked the NYSE to stop reporting the number after it discovered that someone may have infiltrated the proprietary computer codes it uses.

 

I would really like to know if Matthew Goldstein is aware that his article was changed to not only leave out any mention of zerohedge, but that it also leaves out perhaps the most curious tidbit in the whole case, that fact that Goldman didn't appear in the top 15.  Yet another example of the way in which all real journalism is manipulated by CNBC.  I guess Dennis Kneale would have to eat his words if they printed the full version.  Thats a lot of pie in the eye when a "dickweed" blogger gets credited with being on top of the issue.

We'd like to know who was doing the editing too.  And why.

Update: It seems clear now that the CNBC piece actually pre-dated other versions of the article.  Thus, Zero Hedge was apparently added later, rather than removed from the CNBC piece.  (We should have known Dennis didn't have that much pull).