Here We Go Again: CDU/CSU Floor Leader Kauder Says It Has Not Been Decided If There Will Be A Second Greek Bailout Package

Tyler Durden's picture

It seems that some Germans are finally realizing that the way the second Greek bailout package is proposed, will likely never work due to the required voluntary acceptance of 100% of bondholders which gives an essentially infinite value to the nuisance factor of holding out. We were thus not surprised to read overnight that Germany has now once again directly contradicted Juncker's comment from Friday that Bailout #2 was agreed upon "in principle." As Goldman explains: "CDU/CSU floor leader Kauder said in an interview with Bild Zeitung that "it has not been decided yet whether there will be another help package or not". CSU head Seehofer said over the weekend that the approval of the Bundestag was not a given; though it is not even clear whether the Bundestag has to approve another package, depending on which sources are tapped for the program." Look for many more such headline whipsaws as one after another piece of news comes out, now that the troika realizes its last ditch house of cards has finally toppled.

From Goldman:

Details of second Greek package remain unclear - German finance minister proposes maturity extension. Although Eurogroup head Juncker suggested last Friday that there was in principle agreement among Euro-zone governments on a second help package for Greece, no official confirmation has been made so far. What seems to be the case, however, is that the troika of IMF/EC/ECB will approve the disbursement of the next tranche of the current program, assuming that the Greek parliament will approve this week further consolidation measures.

CDU/CSU floor leader Kauder said in an interview with Bild Zeitung that "is has not been decided yet whether there will be another help package or not". CSU head Seehofer said over the weekend that the approval of the Bundestag was not a given; though it is not even clear whether the Buundestag has to approve another package, depending on which sources are tapped for the program.

Welt newspaper is citing an internal report from the German finance ministry that demands a maturity extension as part of another package ("a voluntary exchange of existing bonds into new bonds with an extended maturity (7 years)"). The paper apparently also includes several proposals how to make the debt exchange interesting enough to guarantee a high participation among private investors. The newly issued bonds, for example, should have preferred status compared to existing debt with respect to any potential future debt restructuring. The finance ministry meanwhile has denied a newspaper report that private sector participation for the second package should be in the order of 30 billion.