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The Liberation Treatment?

Leo Kolivakis's picture




 


Submitted by Leo Kolivakis, publisher of Pension Pulse.

For
the first time in a long time, I am excited about a new treatment for
multiple sclerosis (MS). CTV's W5 just had an episode on The Liberation Treatment: A whole new approach to MS:

Amid
the centuries-old castles of the ancient city of Ferrara is a doctor
who has come upon an entirely new idea about how to treat multiple
sclerosis, one that may profoundly change the lives of patients.

 

Dr.
Paolo Zamboni, a former vascular surgeon and professor at the
University of Ferrara in northern Italy, began asking questions about
the debilitating condition a decade ago, when his wife Elena, now 51,
was diagnosed with MS.

 

Watching his wife Elena struggle with
the fatigue, muscle weakness and visual problems of MS led Zamboni to
begin an intense personal search for the cause of her disease. He found
that scientists who had studied the brains of MS patients had noticed
higher levels of iron in their brain, not accounted for by age. The
iron deposits had a unique pattern, often forming in the core of the
brain, clustered around the veins that normally drain blood from the
head. No one had ever fully explained this phenomenon, considering the
excess iron a toxic byproduct of the MS itself.

 

Dr.
Zamboni wondered if the iron came from blood improperly collecting in
the brain. Using Doppler ultrasound, he began examining the necks of MS
patients and made an extraordinary finding. Almost 100 per cent of the
patients had a narrowing, twisting or outright blockage of the veins
that are supposed to flush blood from the brain. He then checked these
veins in healthy people, and found none of these malformations. Nor did
he find these blockages in those with other neurological conditions.

 

"In
my mind, this was unbelievable evidence that further study was
necessary to understand the link between venous function and iron
deposits on the other," Zamboni told W5 from his research lab in
Ferrara.

 

What was equally
astounding, was that not only was the blood not flowing out of the
brain, it was "refluxing" reversing and flowing back upwards. Zamboni
believes that as the blood moves into the brain, pressure builds in the
veins, forcing blood into the brain's grey matter where it sets off a
host of reactions, possibly explaining the symptoms of MS.

 

"For
me, it was really unbelievable to understand that iron deposits in MS
were exactly around the veins. So probably, it is a dysfunction of
drainage of the veins," Zamboni said.

 

"This is very important,
because iron is very dangerous, because it produces free radicals, and
free radicals are killers for cells. So we need to eliminate iron
accumulation."

 

Zamboni dubbed the vein disorder he discovered
CCSVI, or Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency, and began
publishing his preliminary research in neurology journals.

 

He
soon found that the severity of the vein blockages were located
corresponded to the severity of the patient's symptoms. Patients with
only one vein blocked usually had milder forms of the disease; those
with two or more damaged veins had more severe illness.

 

Zamboni
found blockages not only in the veins in the neck directly beneath the
brain -- the jugular veins --but in a central drainage vein, the azygos
vein, which flushes blood down from the brain along the spine.
Blockages here, he found were associated with the most severe form of
MS, primary progressive, in which patients rapidly deteriorate. For
this form of MS, there currently is no effective treatment.

 

As
for how these vein abnormalities form, Zamboni isn't sure. He believes,
though, that congenital defects, problems that likely formed before
birth, can be blamed for most of the problems, though this has not been
conclusively proven.

 

Most neurologists Zamboni initially
approached with his findings dismissed them. But one specialist, Dr. F.
Salvi, at Bellaria Hospital in Bologna, was intrigued by the concept.
He began sending Zamboni MS patients for CCVIS testing, to see if what
he was finding was correct. The images of narrowed or blocked veins,
called "strictures," were irrefutable for Salvi.

 

Focus on a treatment

 

But
Dr. Zamboni had an even more important idea. If key veins of MS
patients were blocked, perhaps he could open them and restore normal
blood flow?

 

Taking a page from standard angiography, in which
doctors use balloons to open up blocked arteries that feed blood from
the heart, he enlisted the help of vascular surgeon Dr. R. Galeotti,
also at the University of Ferrara and Santa Anna Hospital. Three years
ago, the team began a study in which they treated 65 MS patients to see
if endovascular surgery would restore flow in these vessels and lessen
MS symptoms.

 

The study detailing those results will be
published in the Journal of Vascular Surgery on Nov. 24. But
preliminary results, already released, show patients had a decrease in
the number of new MS attacks, a big reduction in the number of brain
lesions that define MS, and improved quality of life. The only time
symptoms returned for the patients was when the veins re-narrowed.

 

Because the surgery freed the blood flow, the team dubbed the procedure "The Liberation Treatment."

Zamboni's
sense is that the earlier patients are diagnosed and treated, the more
function they will preserve, and the less damage the improper blood
flow will do to the brain.

 

"Because
MS is a progressive disease and strikes young people, if we lose time,
there are a lot of young people that will progress without possibility
to get back. This is very heavy for me," he says.

 

Zamboni has
also been studying the prevalence of CCSVI with a team at the
University of Buffalo in New York, in collaboration with Dr. Robert
Zivadinov. That study, to be published in January, has looked at 16 MS
patients, including eight from the U.S and eight from Italy. All have
been found to have blocked veins of CCSVI, just as Zamboni described,
and all eventually underwent the Liberation Treatment.

 

Relief for patients

 

One
of those patients was Buffalo resident Kevin Lipp. Lipp had MS for over
a decade, and as part of the study, discovered he had five blocked
veins in his neck. After undergoing the Liberation Treatment 10 months
ago, he says he hasn't had a single new MS attack.

 

Zamboni
emphasizes that the Liberation Treatment does not make people in
wheelchairs walk again. Rather, it seems to stop the development of
further MS attacks, and in some cases, improves movement and decreases
the debilitating fatigue that are the hallmarks of MS.

 

The foundation that has sponsored Zamboni's research, the Hilarescere Foundation, also urges cautious restraint.

 

"We
can't give the illusion to patients that this is a guaranteed treatment
and it is easy. This is not right. And we have never done this," says
Hilarescere President Fabio Roversi-Monaco. "We don't say this is a
cure for M.S. We only say that research is advancing, and there is
encouraging data but we are waiting for more conclusions."

Dr.
Zivadinov in Buffalo is now starting a new study, recruiting 1,600
adults and 100 children, half of them MS patients. He plans to use
ultrasound and MRI scans to confirm if those with MS also have CCSVI
and if their family members have the abnormalities too.

 

Prof.
Mark Haake, a neuro-imaging scientist at McMaster University and Wayne
State University in Detroit is also intrigued by Zamboni's findings. He
has long been seeing iron deposits in the brains of MS patients using a
specialized MRI analysis called SWI - specific weighted imaging. When
he saw Zamboni's initial publications, he immediately contacted the
Italian doctor and began collaborating.

 

Population studies under way

 

Haake
too is initiating a study, asking neurological centres across North
America and Europe to take some extra MRI scans of the neck and upper
chest of MS patients. The scans can then be electronically sent to his
research team for analysis. He believes this grassroots approach could
spur larger and more in depth studies. He's hoping he can engage MS
specialists and vascular surgeons, interventional radiologist around
the world to study the theory and then move to diagnosing and treating
MS patients quickly.

 

"I think patients do play a role, because
there are millions and millions of dollars donated to MS Societies and
a lot of money set aside by the government to study MS research and
right now, 99.9 per cent of that money goes somewhere else," he told
W5.

 

"So the patients need to speak up and say 'We want
something like this investigated, at least at an early stage, to see if
there is credence to this theory.' Even if it is 10 or 20 per cent of
these people who can be helped, that needs to be investigated," says
Haacke.

 

Haake's research is being done with no funding; he's
unwilling to wait the nine months to a year needed to get formal
research funding applications approved. Urgency, he says, is needed in
finding the answer to the question of whether Dr. Zamboni is right.

 

"Certainly, I continue my battle because I am fully convinced that this is the right thing for the patient," he says.

 

The
MS Societies of Canada and the U.S. are reticent to support Zamboni's
theories. They maintain that: "Based on results published about these
findings to date, there is not enough evidence to say that obstruction
of veins causes MS... It is still not clear whether relieving venous
obstructions would be beneficial."

 

Interest in CCSVI growing

 

But
CCSVI has become a subject of intense interest among MS patients who
are texting and emailing details of Zamboni's work, locating the few
centres around the world that have started to work on studies on CCSVI
and the Liberation Treatment.

 

Zamboni says every day, MS
patients hear about his theory and either write, email or call him
asking for treatment he can't yet provide. Still, some surgeons in the
U.S. are now offering the surgery Zamboni's team has pioneered.

 

Jeff
Beal, an L.A-based, Emmy-Award-winning musical director has already
paid to have the surgery procedure. After he was diagnosed with MS five
years ago, he was left unable to work a full day and worrying he would
spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair. Unable to come to terms
with the diagnosis, his wife, Joan, set to find new treatments and
eventually came upon Zamboni's work. Unable to get her husband treated
in Italy, she convinced a Californian vascular surgeon who already
performs similar surgery on leg veins to look at Zamboni's work and
test Jeff for CCSVI. Jeff was diagnosed with two blocked jugular veins
and treated with the Liberation Treatment. (with a slightly different
procedure than the italan one..using Stents) He now says he has much
more energy and none of the chronic fatigue that used to limit his
activity.

 

"I reached what I would call sort of a higher
plateau, in the sense of the most debilitating symptom, which is the
fatigue. So, I still have fatigue every day, I still battle it; it's
still one of my symptoms. But in terms of the total reservoir of
energy, it's much greater than it used to be. And that's a huge gift,
especially to my family," Beal told W5.

 

His wife Joan was delighted with the surgery's results.

 

"Suddenly,
he's helping Henry with his homework and he's playing trumpet duets
with Henry and he's awake. And there's this presence in the house that
hadn't been there for two years," she said.

 

Joan has now
become a "cheerleader" of Zamboni's work on MS chat sites, urging other
patients to show their neurologists the material being published by the
Italian team and to ask them to consider setting up a study in other MS
clinics.

 

Among all of Zamboni's success stories and the
patients who sing his praises is his wife Elena. Her MS caused her to
lose her vision for a time and develop what she called "violent"
attacks. She had difficulty walking and was losing her balance and
feared a life in a wheelchair unable to care for herself. Elena became
one of her husband's first ultrasound test patients and was found to
have a complete closure of the azygos vein in her central chest. She
was one of the first to be liberated almost three years ago. After
having regular debilitating MS attacks for nearly a decade before,
Elena has been symptom-free ever since. An elegant, intelligent woman,
she now has a quick walk, with no sign of disability. Her husband
couldn't be happier.

 

"What I think is this is probably the best prize of the research," says Zamboni.

 

[Note: Watch the segment by clicking on this link. Watch it all since it continues after commercials.]

I urge all MS patients to get tested for narrowing, twisting or
outright blockage of the veins (this is an easy procedure). Beware of
the reticence of the MS Societies of Canada and the U.S.. They are
notoriously pro drug companies and will discourage patients from
getting tested for blockage or pursuing this treatment.

When it
comes to my health, I am going to do what's best for me. I am going to
get tested as soon as possible and if they do find blockage or
narrowing, I will not wait for three independent placebo controlled
trials before seeking treatment. As Dr. Zamboni said, time is of the
essence because MS is a progressive disease.

If you know of any
MS patients struggling with the disease, please tell them about this
new treatment. It's crucial that patients be aware of this novel
approach for treating this disease.

 

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loderbe's picture

We must ask our doctors and insurance companies to take this matters seriously. I have already called my insurance and they called me back and asked for details. So that's good.

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Fri, 12/25/2009 - 16:13 | 174364 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

We must ask our doctors and insurance companies to take this matters seriously. I have already called my insurance and they called me back and asked for details. So that's good.
I agree with #158958. If there's a problem in my blood vessels, fix it.

Fri, 12/25/2009 - 16:10 | 174359 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

We must ask our doctors and insurance companies to take this matters seriously. I have already called my insurance and they called me back and asked for details. So that's good.
I agree with #158958. If there's a problem in my blood vessels, fix it.

Sat, 12/19/2009 - 00:28 | 169637 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

We the MS sufferers are the ones who should decide to take the risk. Its ok for the doctors to have us take risks in taking meds that are experimental, but they want to slam the brakes on this procedure.

I for one will travel to the US, get the MRI, and get this procedure done now, if the MRI shows I am a candidate.

I do believe that everyone who is slowing this down is funded by the drug companies, curing MS, or any illness< is really bad for business.

Way to go Dr Zamboni.

Thu, 12/10/2009 - 11:49 | 158958 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

This seems to be quite simple and straight forward. If you have MS(I do) or Not, have your veins checked out and if they are blocked get them opened. This is common sense. A rational person or physician would not want to have blood flow restricted to their head no matter what. I am also sure that insurance companies and many doctors will see this as a threat to their wealth strategies and attack it vehemently. Maybe we should have their veins blocked that go to their heads, eh!

Thu, 12/03/2009 - 12:46 | 150825 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

I'm going out on a limb here.....regarding higher incidences of MS the further away from the equator could relate to the fact that there are just as many with kinked veins near the equator but maybe since it's warmer there that their blood is thinner and is more able to move through the blockage? JUST a thought. Otherwise, I think Dr. Zamboni will win the Nobel prize for this finding! And shame on the doctors who are already dismissing his findings without even looking into this more. I emailed the info to my husband's neurologist and she "guaranteed" me that my husband didn't have kinked veins nor would he need surgery. Via email? Really? Unless she had the MRV to disprove it she is a certified nut-case! Oh well, all I can say is my husband will NOT go back to her ever again!

Fri, 12/04/2009 - 23:21 | 153586 mnevins2
mnevins2's picture

My first visit with the MS Specialist is 12/18. I called them today to learn if they had received the medical records from my previous MD (a "regular" neurologist) - they had. I also mentioned the "Liberation Treatment" and that I'd like to fax over the text version submitted by Leo on 11/22.

The nurse that I spoke with was ignorant of LT, but so very kind and polite. I'll report what I learn from the 12/18 visit.

In the meantime, a good friend is an ER MD and he encouraged me to pursue this. He read the article and watched the CATV program and found it commonsensical - although he is skeptical - as he should be.

Mon, 11/30/2009 - 12:55 | 146295 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

i always said that when i booze my symptoms feel much better... this makes perfect sense since we all know booze thins your blood. this is it people!... this is really something profound.. F the ms societies and drs that gives speeches for money... SPREAD THE WORD. please spread the word or this will be swept unda the rug. we all know cash is king. as an ms sufferer for 6 years i just know we've got somethin here! i will pursue immediatly as should you!

Fri, 11/27/2009 - 12:57 | 144080 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

I have been diagnosed for almost 20 years and this is the very first time I have felt that a researcher had actually found something that matches my problems to a tee.

I also used to do an awful lot of volunteering for the NMSS in America and saw how since the mid 90's, the MS Society is catering to and being catered by the Pharmacuetical companies. Needless to say, I don't volunteer anymore. I just simply did not like the direction they were going (too much going to their bike rides and not the people or research).

Sadly, a rather simple solution is NOT what they want. Reminds me of prisons for profit. They need medical marijuana to remain illegal so they can keep those places filled (at taxpayer expense of course).

Tue, 11/24/2009 - 11:11 | 140471 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Starting Tysabri next month, but would be a willing guinea pig for this!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 23:27 | 138982 Leo Kolivakis
Leo Kolivakis's picture

My best friend is a radiologist and he will test me Tuesday morning, first by ultrasound, to see if I have any strictures in my jugular veins. If the ultrasound is negative, he told me I need to do an MRV, which is a specialized MRI for the veins. If they do find blockage, then I can ask an interventional radiologist to do an angioplasty. I am not claiming this is the cure, but my best friend did tell me that these blockages of veins are rare in the normal population. If there is a higher prevalence in MS, then he thinks this theory will be revolutionary. It makes sense to him.

As far a supplements, I've been taking 4,000 IUs of vitamin D for a decade along with calcium/ magnesium, Omega 3, acidophilus and a fairly healthy diet. I think everyone should be taking a minimum of 1,000 IUs of D. It is a crucial vitamin, especially in the winter where we get little sun exposure.

Thu, 01/14/2010 - 19:15 | 194351 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Leo

Any news... I'm looking all over the world to be tested and to get treatment if constriction is found.

Fri, 11/27/2009 - 21:56 | 144556 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Leo,

Just returned from my annual trip to MN and Thanksgiving with the in-laws (We live in Chicago suburb) - one of the first things that I did was check this site.

I see two new entries, but nothing from the "My best friend is a radiologist and he will test me Tuesday morning........."

Is there any news that you can share with me/us?

Thanks.

Mon, 11/23/2009 - 01:28 | 139082 mnevins2
mnevins2's picture

For obvious reasons, please keep me informed of your progress. Like I wrote above, my first meeting with an MS Specialist is 12/18.

I understand that MS has no set pattern, but if the vein blockage indeed exists - and that this IS a condition significantly more likely with MS individuals, well, I don't know what to think or say.......

I am a true believer, but a "miracle" like this is well, too good to be true!?!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 22:32 | 138923 mnevins2
mnevins2's picture

On Friday, November 13th, my neurologist told me that I have MS and that I am to start my drug usage the next week.

This diagnosis did and did not surprise me. Won't bother you with details, but I'm 50, am in excellent shape and easily passed my VEP and test for O.N.

Starting on the 13th, my wife and I began the process of "what's next?" and this led to making an appt to see a local MS Specialist on December 18th.

I am a daily reader of ZH and didn't at first see this post and only caught it on my second or third reading of the day. Like ANON #138857, I am VERY skeptical as an individual, but will make a copy of this post (to bring to my 12/18 appt) and read through the various links.

I had more or less accepted that MS was my new reality - and I don't even know what that means!?!

Thanks and please wish me luck!!!

PS - Do you mean that my daily meal of gold and silver ingots won't cure me?

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 20:33 | 138878 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Thanks, Great article....and i was looking for info on silver!!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 20:14 | 138868 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Sent this to 2 friends

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 19:45 | 138857 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Not to throw cold water on the party, but as a physician I have seen numerous miracle cures go by the wayside over the years. One problem with this explanation for the disease is that it doesn't explain a host of other findings in MS. The placebo response can be a powerful factor is making cures seem effective in the beginning. While this cure may turn out to be as wonderful as it appears, let's wait til we see some double blind studies before declaring it genuine.

Thu, 12/10/2009 - 11:53 | 158963 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

I have MS and I do not see this as a cure. I see it as a relief to the symtoms only. What harm can having restricted veins opened up(preferably by angioplasty) and restoring proper blood flow to the brain do?

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 19:37 | 138853 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Leo, I have read that MS is particularly prevalent in N Hemisphere and S Hemisphere, the further away you move from the equator.
One Australian study has confirmed the ‘latitude gradient’ effect, which shows Tasmanians are eight times more likely to develop MS than Queenslanders. These results complement a new UK finding which links a lack of vitamin D to MS – findings that could lead to an important MS prevention trial, for which Australia is an ideal laboratory.

There is a trial on VitD3 and MS here in Australia...how would that perhaps meld in with the Iron and structure theory? Have you read anything about that? Or would they be perhaps separate avenues of MS causation ie many causes of MS not just one?
http://www.msaustralia.org.au/msra/news-media/news.php
Regards and best wishes!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 21:47 | 138899 heatbarrier
heatbarrier's picture

Why governments are selling Vitamin D short
October 23 2009

The link to MS

Multiple sclerosis is thought to be caused by a mix of environmental and genetic factors. And while scientists are still trying to unravel how these interact, a growing body of research points to vitamin D as a key environmental factor.

In people with MS, the immune system malfunctions and attacks the protective coating around nerve cells known as myelin sheaths. The disease can affect sight, balance, continence, speech and more, and reduces life expectancy. Vitamin D’s influence on MS – and other autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes – is thought to be related to the vitamin’s ability to suppress autoimmune responses.

The link between vitamin D and MS was for many years thought to be wild speculation. Now more and more studies point in the same direction: people who have higher levels of vitamin D in their blood early in life are less likely to get MS later in life. Also, MS patients have been found to have low levels of vitamin D in their blood– and the levels appear to be even lower during relapses.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/11180df8-beaa-11de-b4ab-00144feab49a.html

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 17:07 | 138805 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

The majority of the Canadian health charties have collected large sums of money over the last 25 years. The origional rationalization for the fund raising by the provincial branches was the money raised by the health charity was being ear marked for "medical" research that would deliver the cure!

I am not aware of where any of the "basic" research funded by the Canadian health charties was medically meaningful, was a "Medical" break thru or contributed to any "medical" break thru!

In early 2001 or so, there were queries from grass root supporters (Provincial branches) and the local doctors about the value of and the questionable results of the medical research being funded by their National organization.

This caused internal debate in the Canadian Health charties at the National level about 100% of the medical research funds raised by the local branches having been allocated to "pure basic" research over the last 15 years with very little to show.

The debate revolved around the future medical research budgets being re allocated from 100% pure "basic" research too the US model of "basic" research and applied" medical research. This caused lots of internal debate, upset researchers and the debate at the national level goes on etc

Most Canadian Health Charties in their web site and fund raising literature high lite advocacy, life style changes, exercise and diet etc with "Medical" research being minimized for obvious reasons.

In Canada, I am afraid it is all about the (Basic)research!.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 16:00 | 138786 Hephasteus
Hephasteus's picture

Heme synthesis problem? Wow who would have thought. I know MS follows the exact same degeneration path as ticks infecting a dog.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 15:32 | 138760 Problem Is
Problem Is's picture

" MS Societies of Canada and the U.S.. They are notoriously pro drug companies and will discourage patients from getting tested for blockage or pursuing this treatment."

You nailed it Leo. Nice post.

If it does not provide Big Pharma a high profit drug pipeline... the research does not get funded.

Similarly, if it threatens a Big Pharma a high profit drug pipeline... the research is quashed.

That is why this research and break through came from Italy and not the vaunted "best in he world" US health and medical industries.

This is a common story with many chronic diseases where Europe and Canada are far ahead of the US. Transfusion treatment for Type 1 diabetics is another example. Transfusing insulin producing cells into patients so they attach to the liver and produce insulin eliminating injects for Type 1 diabetics has been successful in Europe since the early 1990s. Why not in America? $1.50 each for test strips that you have to use 4-5 times a day... big profit baby... Diabetic supplies is a huge industry.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 12:51 | 138687 moneymutt
moneymutt's picture

Interesting --- psychic Edgar Cayce medical readings for people often suggested spinal manipulation at certain vertebrae to fix a pinching or narrowing in a certain area. Cayce often mentioned this in regards to diabetes and the function of pancreas.

If improper blood flow leaves junk in brain that hurts, and we get medical establishment used to that concept, maybe they will be open to something else like that happening to other internal organs.

Thanks for the story.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 15:39 | 138766 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

never thought i'd see edgar cayce mentioned here...wondering what the akashic records for ben, lloyd, timmy, hank, larry and the rest of the criminals look like...

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 12:40 | 138686 Leo Kolivakis
Leo Kolivakis's picture

It will be interesting to see how neurologists react to this treatment. Dr. Paul O'Connor who advises the MS Society of Canada came out yesterday on CBC news to say this treatment is "interesting" but warned "more studies need to be done to confirm these results".

My take on this: if what you saw is true, this treatment isn't just interesting, it is revolutionary. The MS Societies of Canada and the U.S. have long been bought by the drug companies. They will do everything in their power to dismiss and attack this treatment.

But if you watched the whole segment, the treatment benefitted progressive MS patients who had long passed the relapsing-remitting phase. Also, why was this blockage found in MS patients and not in other patients suffering neurological diseases? (It will be interesting to see if other patients suffering from "autoimmune diseases" have similar blockages).

The bottom line is that it's easy to test Dr. Zamboni's theory and if you are suffering from MS and drug therapy doesn't seem to work, then I suggest you explore this treatment.

The MS societies are going to tell you to wait five years for three independent randomized placebo controlled studies before proceeding with any new treatment. Sure, in drug therapies, I agree with this approach (look at the deaths associated with Tysabri).

But this procedure carries little if any risk, so why not try it?

Mon, 11/23/2009 - 00:18 | 138682 heatbarrier
heatbarrier's picture

Thanks for the tip above on the http://www.thisisms.com website, very interesting, check this recent post,

Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

http://www.thisisms.com/article282.html

They are the right track here but few people believe that the solution could be so simple,

http://www.thisisms.com/forum-27-days0-0.html

The new area of Evolutionary Medicine gives the scientific explanation of many chronic illnesses, this is a good article, Paul Ewald is great,

http://www.theatlantic.com/issues/99feb/germs.htm

PS, sorry for the triple posting, I didn't want the unintended double posts go to waste.  

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 13:06 | 138681 heatbarrier
heatbarrier's picture

BTW, Omega-3 deficiency leads to vascular disorders, that may explain the narrowing of arteries.  It's a matter of what is cause and what is an effect, very difficult in medicine.  

http://www.fatsoflife.com/vascular_disease.php

http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Fatty+acids+cut+heart-artery+narrowing.-a0...

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 12:16 | 138680 heatbarrier
heatbarrier's picture

MS incidence shows latitude gradient, higher incidence in higher latitudes. This points towards Vitamin D deficiency, the most potent hormone in the body, not a vitamin,

http://www.sunarc.org/msmap.htm

I think Omega-3 deficiency is also involved, MS is one of many myelin-related neurological disorders,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9o8rd3Hx1NI

My recommendation is to try is Cod Liver Oil, Vitamin D + Omega-3. No downside, huge upside if it works. Many friends have benefited, give it a try.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 10:56 | 138659 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

As a surgeon I pass this along:

This is ABSOLUTELY how new treatments are found. The next step will be rejection by the majority of neurologists, followed by a flood of patients who want it done (and get their problems fixed), followed by grudging acceptance of the idea, procedure, and disappearance of the old ways of doing things.

Zamboni, as my daughter would say, you rock.

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 09:16 | 138639 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

What amazing news. Just as I was about to give up with finding a means of dissolving symptoms this appears. It also appears that I might have some funds available to do something about it.
I have been diagnosed for 20 years now and have been told secondary progressive is where I am at. That was 4 years ago. I have not accepted anything the neurologists have told me so far. Maybe this will make the change I need to reduce the fatigue and loss of balance that has worsened in recent months.
Vernon

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 07:53 | 138628 time123
time123's picture

Amazing developments. Thank you for sharing.

time123

http://invetrics.com

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 02:44 | 138589 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

As an MS'er and a ZH'er, I am proud that this article is getting such a great response from everyone. Not only is the story behind the Dr. Zamboni's research fantastic, but his theory is being promoted in a very grass roots fashion. In fact, the MS societies have remained very skeptical about these findings and have actually issued statements warning MS'ers about this research. We have been forced to go at this ourselves, and there are many patients lobbying their doctors for testing, despite the doctor's negative feedback. In any case, I think the ZH community would be very happy to know that the same values espoused in this financial community blog are being mirrored with great success in our MS community at thisisms.com.

Thanks, Leo, for posting this!!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 02:05 | 138581 MinnesotaNice
MinnesotaNice's picture

That was an amazing article Leo... thanks for going a little off topic... and sharing that :-)

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 01:08 | 138568 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Leo,
I've read a bunch of your stuff at naked capitalism and didn't realize you have MS. Obviously you can figure it all out for yourself, but if you haven't seen it, U.S. MS patient ground zero for this can be found here:

http://www.thisisms.com/forum-40.html

This is (one of?) the place where Joan who was in the W5 special posts.

Sat, 11/21/2009 - 23:47 | 138535 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

Great read. I have trouble saying Zamboni with a straight face. Passing along to my uncle who suffers from MS.

I realize there are exceptions, but for the most part I take issue with the general idea of congenital or hereditary. While it is certainly valid, it is used to explain away too many conditions (tin: perhaps to make us feel helpless and resort to relying on the "Sick Care system.), while nutrition, behavior and environment are rarely scrutinized to anything approaching a sufficient level.

Similar to the many mis-diagnoses of our economic travails. There are many inputs, many variables, and a lack of sufficient digging.

Sat, 11/21/2009 - 23:38 | 138531 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

As a physician I would tell zerohedge readers: this is the kind of research that has the greatest breakthrough potential. Way to go zero heads!

Sun, 11/22/2009 - 00:00 | 138544 Anonymous
Anonymous's picture

If this is true the implications will be huge. Not only for sufferers... but also in requestioning conventional scientific/medical orthodoxies. I was under the impression MS was probably viral in origin... let's just hope this is for real.

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qrs521's picture

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