Mark Pittman Wins: Fed To Disclose Emergency Lending Details By December 1

Tyler Durden's picture

Mark Pittman's last valiant effort to bring some transparency to the most destructive organization in the history of mankind has succeeded. According to testimony to be delivered to the House tomorrow, "under a framework established by
the act, the Federal Reserve will, by December 1, provide detailed
information regarding individual transactions conducted across a range
of credit and liquidity programs over the period from December 1, 2007,
to July 20, 2010
. This information will include the names of
counterparties, the date and dollar value of individual transactions,
the terms of repayment, and other relevant information.
On an ongoing
basis, subject to lags specified by the Congress to protect the efficacy
of the programs, the Federal Reserve also will routinely provide
information regarding the identities of counterparties, amounts financed
or purchased and collateral pledged for transactions under the discount
window, open market operations, and emergency lending facilities." Luckily this action by Bernanke will prevent the rioting that would have followed an appeal to the Supreme court, which would have certainly sided with the secretive group of Keynesian priests. If nothing else, the plethora of data will keep the blogosphere preoccupied for days upon days, rummaging through millions of pages of explicit corruption.

Let's see now if December 2nd leads to the end of the world destruction that the Clearing House Association threatened would happen should the Fed disclose these details, as we reported a year ago. To wit:

The Clearing House submits this declaration because the Court's Order threatens to impair the ability of our members to access emergency funds through the New York Fed's Discount Window without suffering the severe competitive harm that public disclosure of their identity will cause.

Our members have accessed the New York Fed's Discount Window with the understanding that the Fed will not publicly disclose information about their borrowing, especially their identity. Industry experience, including very recent and searing experience, has shown that negative rumors about a bank's financial condition - even completely unfounded rumors - have caused competitive harm, including bank runs and failures.

If the names of our member banks who borrow emergency funds are publicly disclosed, the likelihood that a borrowing bank's customers, counterparties and other market participants will draw a negative inference is great. Public speculation that a financial institution is experiencing liquidity shortfalls - which would be a natural inference from having tapped emergency funds - has caused bank customers to withdraw deposits, counterparties to make collateral calls and lenders to accelerate loan repayment or refuse to make new loans. When an institution's customers flee and its credit dries up the institution may suffer severe capital and liquidity strains leaving it in a weakened competitive position.

Or maybe, just maybe, the banks will survive, and all their bullshit will be exposed for the hollow threats it has always been, very much like the end of the world that would have occured had Goldman and AIG been, gasp, allowed to fail.

Below is the relevant section from the Bernanke testimony to be given tomorrow before the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs:

A final element of the Federal Reserve's efforts to implement the
Dodd-Frank Act relates to the transparency of our balance sheet and
liquidity programs. Well before enactment, we were providing a great
deal of relevant information on our website, in statistical releases,
and in regular reports to the Congress. Under a framework established by
the act, the Federal Reserve will, by December 1, provide detailed
information regarding individual transactions conducted across a range
of credit and liquidity programs over the period from December 1, 2007,
to July 20, 2010. This information will include the names of
counterparties, the date and dollar value of individual transactions,
the terms of repayment, and other relevant information. On an ongoing
basis, subject to lags specified by the Congress to protect the efficacy
of the programs, the Federal Reserve also will routinely provide
information regarding the identities of counterparties, amounts financed
or purchased and collateral pledged for transactions under the discount
window, open market operations, and emergency lending facilities. 

Full testimony can be found here. We really do hope at least one Congressman will have the guts tomorrow to ask just how it is that the Clearing House Association allowed this act, which will inevitably lead to the collapse of the banking system, to proceed?