This page has been archived and commenting is disabled.

Next Domino: Syria Shuts Down Internet Service

Tyler Durden's picture





 

With Egypt pretty a done deal, many are wondering who is next. Al Arabiya provides the answer: Syria has just shut down its internet service. And as one glance at the map below suggests, should this indeed be the case, and if Jordan promptly follows suit, Israel will be surrounded by revolutions. Which is surely a reason for WTI to plunge another 20%.

File:LocationSyria.svg

 


- advertisements -

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:00 | Link to Comment Caviar Emptor
Caviar Emptor's picture

I was waiting for that one. Next stop: Kuwait, Oman, Islamabad

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:13 | Link to Comment jus_lite_reading
jus_lite_reading's picture

Well, it looks like another GREEN SHOOT, just as BEnron expected. I suppose once the Suez canal is shut down, the markets will have another reason to rally.

Sovereign downgrades, mass riots, toppled gov'ts, "snow storms" -- there are so many reasons to rally the markets!

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:16 | Link to Comment egdeh orez
egdeh orez's picture

I don't get why "WTI to plunge another 20%"... can someone explain pls.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:53 | Link to Comment shortus cynicus
shortus cynicus's picture

It was ironic.

But proper ironical explanation wold be: because putting cars on fire requires less fuel than driving them, so global global demand must fall. Futures contracts must feel a pressure too, there is plenty new countries where there are enough cars to be burned.

This contagion may actually stop only on chinese border - they have prepared for such a case and have build a wall some time ago.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:41 | Link to Comment VegasBD
VegasBD's picture

awesome. hahahahah

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 17:32 | Link to Comment benburnyanki
benburnyanki's picture

This is the godamn funniest goddam thing I read today. Jesus de Cristo you Dang Chinese folks are funnier than hell. One of the funniest damn movies I ever seen was a one about a Chinese Prince that I can't remember but someone help me. It was called 'The Legend of Prince Jeet Kun Do Kung Fuki Juki' or something like that. Its a Chinese Cult Movie so any Chinese folk know exactly which movie I talk about. It so funny it made me laugh and hurt. I want to see again. Godamn China rules.

Oh and the second fookin funiest movie I ever saw was an old Jap movie. The Seventh Samurai.

It funny movie roundeyes.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 23:37 | Link to Comment Heavy
Heavy's picture

Beautiful

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:18 | Link to Comment TrihumpTheInsultDog
TrihumpTheInsultDog's picture

The authors alter ego is Fidel Sarcastro.

Read:
"Short-Term, High-Probability Mean-Reversion Indicator: China, Gold and Oil Have Hit Short-Term Oversold Extreme"

http://seekingalpha.com/article/248677-short-term-high-probability-mean-...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:44 | Link to Comment bruinjoe93
bruinjoe93's picture

Tyler's skepticism is right on the mark. Oil prices normally jump when there is tension in the Middle East.  Oil prices should be en fuego right now.  WTI is being manipulated by the Feds.  It is a secret form of price control.  Rigg the price of oil futures to mask inflation.  Gasoline is the item that reacts to the underlying commodity the fastest.  This contrasts to other items like cotton and wheat.  A price jump in cotton and wheat futures normally takes 6-9 months before it is felt on main street.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:48 | Link to Comment Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre's picture

OMG bro... this website is all about sarcasm and a dash of disdain about the current broken state of markets.... read all articles on this site with a serious grain of salt.  

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:27 | Link to Comment kalum
kalum's picture

Australian cyclones

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:45 | Link to Comment iDealMeat
iDealMeat's picture

+popcorn

Never let a crisis go to waste.

go chaos!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:36 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture
by jus_lite_reading
on Fri, 01/28/2011 - 10:13
#912807

 

Well, it looks like another GREEN SHOOT

********************************************************

I Agree!!!! Hell Ya!!! Green Shoots!!!!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:58 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

Organic Growth!!!

 

If the police shoot tear gas at people on their knees praying? seriously? really? on their knees praying... and the police are shooting shit at them..

 

People praying need security, take note.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:14 | Link to Comment nonclaim
nonclaim's picture

Turkey, as is it surrounded by failing States.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:14 | Link to Comment tekhneek
tekhneek's picture

Syria had internet access?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:52 | Link to Comment dark pools of soros
dark pools of soros's picture

yes - they had to set it up for that Clooney movie

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:05 | Link to Comment JLee2027
JLee2027's picture

+1

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:46 | Link to Comment chumbawamba
chumbawamba's picture

Syria was one of the first Arab countries to allow access to the Internet.  Bashar Assad is a computer nerd.

You guys need to drop your misconceptions about the Arab world in general, and especially Syria in particular.

I am Chumbawamba.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:28 | Link to Comment cbaba
cbaba's picture

Who says it will not come to Europe, i mean riots, protests for a financial reform.

And eventually this will come to US.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:58 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

God Willing!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:03 | Link to Comment Agent P
Agent P's picture

It's frightening to think what this would look like if it ever came to the US.  Imagine all those people in the streets of Egypt, only instead of rocks they have AR-15s and glocks.  Now replace the baton wielding riot police with the national guard and/or other military branches.  That's a truly scary scenario.  However, I don't think it will happen.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:54 | Link to Comment chumbawamba
chumbawamba's picture

It certainly won't happen the way you think...but it'll happen.

Gold, Guns, Garden.

I am Chumbawamba.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 15:39 | Link to Comment Agent P
Agent P's picture

What's your prediction for how it plays out?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:00 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

**********************************************************************************

Documents on the First Congress Debate on Arms and Militia.

 

Extracted from The Origins of the American Constitution, A Documentary History, Edited by Michael Kammen, Penguin Books, 1986; and from Creating the Bill of Rights: The Documentary Record from the First Federal Congress, Edited by Helen E. Veit, et al., The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. (Edacted by Jim Knoppow)

From the Madison Resolution, June 8, 1789.

Resolved, that the following amendments ought to be proposed by Congress to the legislatures of the states, to become, if ratified by three fourths thereof, part of the constitution of the United States... The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed; a well armed, and well regulated militia being the best security of a free country; but no person religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled to render military service in person...

AMENDMENTS PROPOSED BY STATES

Massachusetts Convention — Did not propose a keeping and bearing amendment, nor a militia nor a standing army amendment.

South Carolina — Proposed no keeping and bearing, or militia or standing army amendment.

New Hampshire — TENTH, That no standing Army shall be Kept up in time of Peace unless with the consent of three fourths of the Members of each branch of Congress, nor shall Soldiers in Time of Peace be Quartered upon private Houses without the consent of the Owners... TWELFTH Congress shall never disarm any Citizen unless such as are or have been in Actual Rebellion.

Virginia — SEVENTEENTH, That the people have a right to keep and bear arms; that a well regulated Militia composed of the body of the people trained to arms is the proper, natural and safe defence of a free State. That standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, and therefore ought to be avoided, as far as the circumstances and protection of the Community will admit; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to and governed by the Civil power. EIGHTEENTH, That no Soldier in time of peace ought to be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner, and in time of war in such manner only as the laws direct. NINETEENTH, That any person religiously scrupulous of bearing arms ought to be exempted upon payment of an equivalent to employ another to bear arms in his stead... (Amendments proposed to the body of the Constitution).... NINTH, that no standing army or regular troops shall be raised or kept up in time of peace, without the consent of two thirds of the members present in both houses. TENTH, That no soldier shall be inlisted for any longer term than four years, except in time of war, and then for no longer term than the continuance of the war. ELEVENTH, That each State respectively shall have the power to provide for organizing, arming and disciplining it's own Militia, whensoever Congress shall omit or neglect to provide for the same. That the Militia shall not be subject to Martial Law, except when in actual service in time of war, invasion, or rebellion; and when not in the actual service of the United States, shall be subject only to such fines, penalties and punishments as shall be directed or inflicted by the laws of its own State.

New York — That the People have a right to keep and bear Arms; that a well regulated Militia, including the body of the People capable of bearing Arms, is the proper, natural and safe defence of a free State; that the Militia should not be subject to Martial Law, except in time of War Rebellion or Insurrection. That standing Armies in time of Peace are dangerous to Liberty, and ought not to be kept up, except in Cases of necessity; and that at all times, the Military should be under strict Subordination to the Civil Power. That in time of Peace no Soldier ought to be quartered in any House without the consent of the Owner, and in time of War only by the civil Magistrate in such manner as the Laws may direct...that the Militia of any State shall not be compelled to serve without the limits of the State for a longer term than six weeks, without the Consent of the Legislature thereof.

HOUSE COMMITTEE REPORT, July 28, 1789.

...[6] "A well regulated militia1, composed of the body of the people, being the best security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, but no person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms."2

HOUSE RESOLUTION AND ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT; August 24, 1789.

ARTICLE THE FIFTH. A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the People, being the best security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed, but no one religiously scrupulous of bearing arms shall be compelled to render military service in person.3

On September 4, the Senate agreed to amend Article 5 to read as follows: A well regulated militia, being the best security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

On September 9, the Senate replaced "the best" with "necessary to the." On the same day, the Senate disagreed to a motion to insert "for the common defence" after "bear arms." This article and the following ones were then renumbered as articles 4 through 8.

ARTICLE THE SIXTH. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner prescribed by law.

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT; September 8, 1789

That no standing army or regular troops shall be raised or kept up in time of peace, without the consent of two thirds of the members present in both houses. That no soldier shall be enlisted for any longer term than four years, except in time of war, and then for no longer term than the continuance of the war. That each State respectively shall have the power to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining its own militia, whensoever Congress shall omit or neglect to provide for the same. That the militia shall not be subject to martial law, except when in actual service in time or war, invasion or rebellion; and when not in the actual service of the United States, shall be subject only tosuch fines, penalties, and punishments as shall be directed or inflicted by the laws of its own State.

SENATE AMENDMENTS, September 9, 1789

[8] To erase the word "fifth" — & insert — fourth — & to erase from the fifth article the words, "composed of the body of the people — the word "best" — & the words "but no one religiously scrupulous of bearing arms shall be compelled torender military service in person" — & insert after the word "being" in the first line — necessary to.

ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT, as Agreed to by the Senate, September 14, 1789

ARTICLE THE FOURTH. A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

DEBATE ON THE MILITIA AND RIGHT TO KEEP AND BEAR IN THE HOUSE (Senate debates were secret).

The Congressional Register, 17 August 1789

The house went into a committee of the whole, on the subject of amendments. The 3d clause of the 4th proposition in the report was taken into consideration, being as follows; "A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the people, being the best security of a free state; the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, but no person, religiously scrupulous, shall be compelled to bear arms.

Mr. Gerry — This declaration of rights, I take it, is intended to secure the people against the mal-administration of the government; if we could suppose that in all cases the rights of the people would be attended to, the occasion for guards of this kind would be removed. Now, I am apprehensive, sir, that this clause would give an opportunity to the people in power to destroy the constitution itself. They can declare who are those religiously scrupulous, and prevent them from bearing arms. What, sir, is the use of a militia? It is to prevent the establishment of a standing army, the bane of liberty. Now it must be evident, that under this provision, together with their other powers, congress could take such measures ith respect to a militia, as make a standing army necessary. Whenever government mean to invade the rights and liberties of the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order to raise an army upon their ruins. This was actually done by Great Britain at the commencement of the late revolution. They used every means in their power to prevent the establishement of an effective militia to the eastward. The assembly of Massachusetts, seeing the rapid progress that administration were making, to divest them of their inherent privileges, endeavored to counteract them by the organization of the militia, but they were always defeated by the influence of the crown.

Mr. Seney — Wished to know what question there was before the committee, in order to ascertain the point upon which the gentleman was speaking?

Mr. Gerry — Replied, that he meant to make a motion, as he disapproved of the words as they stood. He then proceeded, No attempts that they made, were successful, until they engaged in the struggle which emancipated them at once from their thralldom. Now, if we give a discretionary power to exclude those from militia duty who have religious scruples, we may as well make no provision on this head; for this reason he wished the words to be altered so as to be confined to persons belonging to a religious sect, scrupulous of bearing arms.

Mr. Jackson — Did not expect that all the people of the United States would turn Quakers or Moravians, consequently one part would have to defend the other, in case of invasion; now this, in his opinion, was unjust, unless the consitution secured an equivalent, for this reason he moved to amend the clause, by inserting at the end of it "upon paying an equivalent to be established by law."

Mr. Smith, (of S.C.) — Enquired what were the words used by the conventions respecting this amendment; if the gentleman would conform to what was proposed by Virginia and Carolina, he would second him: He thought they were to be excused provided they found a substitute.

Mr. Jackson — Was willing to accommodate; he thought the expression was, "No one, religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled to render military service in person, upon paying an equivalent."

Mr. Sherman — Conceived it difficult to modify the clause and make it better. It is well-known that those who are religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, are equally scrupulous of getting substitutes or paying an equivalent; many of them would rather die than do either one or the other — but he did not see an absolute necessity for a clause of this kind. We do not live under an arbitrary government, said he, and the states respectively will have the government of the militia, unless when called into actual service; beside, it would not do to alter it so as to exclude the whole of any sect, because there are men amongst the quakers who will turn out, notwithstanding the religious principles of this society, and defend the cause of their country. Certainly it will be improper to prevent the exercise of such favorable dispositions, at least while it is the practice of nations to determine their contests by the slaughter of their citizens and subjects.

Mr. Vining — Hoped the clause would be suffered to remain as it stood, because he saw no use in it if it as amended so as to compel a man to find a substitute, which, with respect to the government, was the same as if the person himself turned out to fight.

Mr. Stone — Enquired what the words "Religiously scrupulous" had reference to, was it of bearing arms? If it was, it ought so to be expressed.

Mr. Benson — Moved to have the words "But no person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms" struck out. He would always leave it to the benevolence of the legislature — for, modify it, said he, as you please, it will be impossible to express it in such a manner as to clear it from ambiguity. No man can claim this indulgence of right. It may be a religious persuasion, but it is no natural right, and therefore ought to be left to the discretion of the government. If this stands part of the constitution, it will be a question before the judiciary, on every regulation you make with respect to the organization of the militia, whether it comports with this declaration or not? It is extremely injudicious to intermix matters of doubt with fundamentals. I have no reason to believe but the legislature will always possess humanity enough to indulge this class of citizens in a matter they are so desirous of, but they ought to be left to their discretion.

The motion for striking out the whole clause being seconded, was put, and decided in the negative, 22 members voting for it, and 24 against it.

Mr. Gerry — Objected to the first part of the clause, on account of the uncertainty with which it is expressed: a well-regulated militia being the best security of a free state, admitted an idea that a standing army was a secondary one. It ought to read "a well regulated militia, trained to arms," in which case it would become the duty of the government to provide this security, and furnish a greater certainty of its being done.

Mr. Gerry's motion not being seconded, the question was put on the clause as reported, which being adopted.

Mr. Burke — Proposed to add to the clause just agreed to, an amendment to the following effect: "A standing army of regular troops in time of peace, is dangerous to public liberty, and such shall not be raised or kept up in tim of peace but from necessity, and for the security of the people, nor then without the consent of two-thirds of the members present of both houses, and in all cases the military shall be subordinate to the civil authority." This being seconded.

Mr. Vining — Asked whether this was to be considered as an addition to the last clause, or an amendment by itself? If the former, he would remind the gentleman the clause was decided; if the latter, it was improper to introduce new matter, as the house had referred the report specially to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Burke — Feared that what with being trammelled in rules, and the apparent disposition of the committee, he should not be able to get them to consider any amendment; he submitted to such proceeding because he could not help himself.

Mr. Hartley — Thought the amendment in order, and was ready to give his opinion of it. He hoped the people of America would always be satisfied with having a majority to govern. He never wished to see two-thirds or three-fourths required, because it might put it in the power of a small minority to govern the whole union.

The question on mr. Burke's motion was put, and lost by a majority of 13.

AUGUST 20, 1789

Mr. SCOTT objected to the clause in the sixth amendment, "No person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms." He said, if this becomes part of the constitution, we can neither call upon such persons for services nor an equivalent; it is attended with still further difficulties, for you can never depend upon your militia. This will lead to the violation of another article in the constitution, which secures to the people the right of keeping arms, as in this case you must have recourse to a standing army. I conceive it is a matter of legislative right altogether. I know there are many sects religiously scrupulous in this respect: I am not for abridging them of any indulgence by law; my design is to guard against those who are of no religion. It is said that religion is on the decline; if this is the case, it is an argument in my favour; for when the time comes that there is no religion, persons will more generally have recourse to these pretexts to get excused.

Mr. BOUDINOT said that the provision in the clause or something like it appeared to be necessary. What dependence can be placed in men who are conscientious in this respect? Or what justice can there be in compelling them to bear arms, when, if they are honest men, they would rather die than use them. He then adverted to several instances of oppression in the case which occurred during the [revolutionary] war. In forming a militia we ought to calculate for an effectual defence, and not compel characters of this description to bear arms. I wish that in establishing this government we may be careful to let every person know that we will not interfere with any person's particular religious profession. If we strike out this clause, we shall lead such persons to conclude that we mean to compel them to bear arms.

Mr. VINING and Mr. JACKSON spake upon the question. The words 'in person' were added after the word 'arms', and the amendment was adopted.

LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS REFERING TO KEEPING AND BEARING

Fisher Ames to George R. Minor. 12 June, 1789

The civil departments will employ us next, and the judiciary the Senate. They will finish their stint, as the boys say, before the House has done. Their number is less, and they have matured the business in committee. Yet Mr. Madison has inserted, in his amendments, the increase of representatives, each State having two at least. The rights of conscience, of bearing arms, of changing the government, are declared to be inherent in the people. Freedom of the press too. There is a prodigious great dose for a medicine. But it will stimulate the stomach as little as hasty-pudding. It is rather food than physic. An immense mass of sweet and other herbs and roots for a diet drink.

Samuel Nasson to George Thatcher. 9 July 1787

I find that Amendments are once again on the Carpet. I hope that such may take place as will be for the Best Interest of the whole. A Bill of rights well secured that we the people may know how far we may Proceade in Every Department then their will be no Dispute Between people and rulers in that may be secured the right to keep and bear arms for Common and Extraordinary Occations such as to secure ourselves against the wild Beast and also to amuse us by fowling and for our Defence against a Common Enemy you know to learn the Use of arms is all that can Save us from a forighn foe that may attempt to subdue us for if we keep up the Use of arms and become well acquainted with them we Shall allway be able to look them in the face that arise up against us for it is impossible to Support a Standing armey large Enough to Guard our Lengthy Sea Coast and now Spare me on the subject of Standing armeys in a time of Peace they allway was first or last the downfall of all free Governments it was by their help Caesar made proud Rome Own a Tyrant and a Traytor for a Master.

Only think how fatal they ware to the peace of this Countery in 1770 what Confeusion they Brought on the fatal 5 of March [the Boston Massacre] I think the remembrance of that Night is enough to make us Carefull how we Introduce them in a free republican Government — I therefore hope they will be Discouraged for I think the man that Enters as a Soldier in a time of peace only for a living is only a fit tool to inslave his fellows.

For this purpose was a Standing Army first introduced in the World anoather that I hope will be Established in the bill is tryals by Juryes in all Causes Excepting where the parties agree to be without I never wish to be in the power of any Sett of Men let them be Never so good but hope to be left in the hands of my Countery and if any Enemey means to bribe he must have money anough to settle it with the Country.

ROGER SHERMAN'S PROPOSED COMMITTEE REPORT. 21-28 July 17894

...5 The Militia shall be under the government of the laws of the respective States, when not in the actual Service of the united States, but Such rules as may be prescribed by Congress for their uniform organisation & discipline shall be observed in officering and training them. but military Service Shall not be required of persons religiously Scrupulous of bearing arms.

6 No Soldier Shall be quartered in any private house, in time of Peace, nor at any time, but by authority of law.

Richard Henry Lee to Charles Lee, 28 August 1789

The enclosed paper will shew you the amendments passed the H. of R. to the Constitution — They are short of som essentials, as Election interference & Standing Army &c. I was surprised to find in the Senate that it was proposed we should postpone the consideration of Amendments until Experience had shewn the necessity of any — As if experience was more necessary to prove the propriety of those great principles of Civil liberty which the wisdom of Ages has found to be necessary barriers against the encroachments of power in the hands of frail Men! My Colleague was sick & absent. The laboring oar was with me. A Majority of 2 thirds however agreed to take the Amendments under consideration next Monday — I hope that if we cannot gain the whole loaf, we shall at least have some bread.

Theodorick Bland Randolph to St. George Tucker, 9 September 1789

The house of Representatives have been for some time past engaged on the subject of amendments to the constitution, though in my opinion they have not made one single material one. The senate are at present engaged on that subject; Mr. Richd. H. Lee told me that he proposed to strike out the standing army in time of peace but could not carry it. He also sais that it has been proposed, and warmly favoured that, liberty of Speach and of the press may be stricken out, as they only tend to promote licenciousness. If this takes place god knows what will follow.

John Randolph to St. George Tucker, 11 September 1789

A majority of the Senate for not allowing the militia arms & if two thirds had agreed it would have been an amendment to the Constitution. They are afraid that the Citizens will stop their full Career to Tyranny & Oppression.

Richard Henry Lee to Patrick Henry, 14 September 17895

[I have] since waited to see the issue of the proposed amendts. to the Constitution, that I might giver you the most [exact] account of that business. As they came from the H. of R. they were very far short of the wishes of our Convention, but as they are returned by the Senate they are certainly much weakened. You may be assured that nothing on my part was left undone to prevent this, and every possible effort was used to give success to all the Amendments proposed by our Country — We might as well have attempted to move Mount Atlas upon our shoulders — In fact, the idea of subsequent Amendments was delusion altogether, and so intended by the greater part of those who arrogated to themselves the name of Federalists. I am grieved to see that too many look at the Rights of the people as a Miser examines a Security to find a flaw in it! The great points of free election, Jury trial in criminal cases much loosened, the unlimited right of Taxation, and Standing Armies in peace, remain as they were. Some valuable Rights are indeed declared, but the powers that remain are very sufficient to render them nugatory at pleasure.

The most essential danger from the present System arises, [in my] opinion, from its tendency to a Consolidated government, instead of a Union of Confederated States — The history of the world and reason concurs in proving that so extensive a Territory [as the] U. States comprehend never was, or can be governed in freed[om] under the former idea — Under the latter is it abundantly m[ore] practicable, because extended representation, know[lege of] character, and confidence in consequence, [are wanting to sway the] opinion of Rulers, without which, fear the offspri[ng of Tyranny] can alone answer. Hence Standing Armies, and des[potism] follows. I take this reasoning to be unrefutable, a[nd] therefore it becomes the friends of liberty to guard [with] perfect vigilance every right that belongs to the Sta[tes] and to protest against every invasion of them — taking care always to procure as many protesting States as possible — This kind of vigilance will create caution and probably establish such a mode of conduct as will create a system of precedent that will prevent a Consolidating effect from taking place by slow, but sure degrees. And also not to cease in renewing their efforts for so amending the federal Constitution as to prevent a Consolidation by securing the due Authority of the States. At present perhaps a sufficient number of Legislatures cannot be got to agree in demanding a Convention — But I shall be much mistaken if a great sufficiency will not e'er long concur in this measure. The preamble to the Amndmnts is realy curious — A careless reader would be apt to suppose that the amendments desired by the States had been graciously granted. But when the thing done is compared with that desired, nothing can be more unlike...

By comparing the Senate amendments with [those] from below by carefully attending to the m[atter] the former will appear will calculated to enfeeble [and] produce ambiguity — for instance — Rights res[erved] to the States or the People — The people here is evidently designed fo[r the] People of the United States, not of the Individual States [page torn] the former is the Constitutional idea of the people — We the people &c. It was affirmed the Rights reserved by the States bills of rights did not belong to the States — I observed that then they belonged to the people of the States, but that this mode of expressing was evidently calculated to give the Residuum to the people of the U. States, which was the Constitutional language, and to deny it to the people of the Indiv. State — At least that it left room for cavil & false construction — They would not insert after people thereof — altho it was moved.

Also on August 17, 1789, Benson made a motion to strike out "but no person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms." The COWH turned down the motion by a vote of 24 - 22.

Also on August 17, 1789, Burke proposed to insert "A standing army of regular troops in time of peace, is dangerous to public liberty, and shall not be raised or kept up in time of peace but from necessity, and for the security of the people, nor then withut the consent of two-thirds of the members present of both houses, and in all cases the military shall be subordinate to the civil authority." This was voted down by a majority of 13.

On August 20, the House agreed to insert "in person," so that the clause read, "but no person religiously scrupulous shall be compelled to bear arms in person."

On August 24, 1789, a House Resolution and Articles of Amendments were passed and sent to the Senate. The Amendment then read: "Article the Fifth. A well regulated militia, composed of the body of the People, being the best security of a free State, the right of the People to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed, but no one religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled to render military service in person."

On September 4, 1789, the Senate disapproved a motion to insert at the end, "that standing armies, in time of peace, being dangerous to Liberty, should be avoided as far as the circumstances and protection of the community will admit; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by the civil Power. That no standing army or regular troops shall be raised in time of peace, without the consent of two thirds of the Members present in both Houses, and that no soldier shall be inlisted for any longer term than the continuance of the war."

Also on September 4, 1789, the Senate agreed to amend Article 5 to read: "A well regulated militia, being the best security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

On September 8, 1789, the Senate Legislative Journal shows the following entry as an additional article of amendment: "That each State respectively shall have the power to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining its own militia, whensoever Congress shall omit or neglect to provide for the same. That the militia shall not be subject to martial law, except when in the actual service in time of war, invasion or rebellion; and when not in the actual service of the United States, shall be subject only to such fines, penalties, and punishments as shall be directed or inflicted by the laws of its own State."

On September 9, 2789 the Senate replaced "the best" with "necessary to the." Thus, the proposed amendment read: "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

On September 14, 1789, the Senate agreed to twelve Articles of Amendment. The preamble reads: "The Conventions of a Number of the States having, at the Time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a Desire, in Order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its Powers, that further declaratory and restrictive Clauses shuld be added: And as extending the Ground of public Confidence in the Government, will best insure the beneficent end of its Institution — " A joint resolution of the Senate and House of Representatives was drafted to forward the twelve amendments to the States for consideration. The House disagreed. The Fourth Amendment read: "A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

On September 24, 1789 a Conference Committee Report was issued whereby difference were reconciled. The Fourth Amendment remained unchanged. The House issued a resolution requesting the President forward the Articles of Amendments to the States, plus Rhode Island and North Carolina.

1. On August 17, a motion by Gerry to insert "trained to arms" at this point failed for want of a second.

2. On August 17, Jackson made a motion in the Committe of the Whole House to insert "upon paying an equivalent to be established by law," at this point. On the suggestion of Smith (S.C.), Jackson proposed to change this phrase to, "No one, religiously scrupulous of bearing arms, shall be compelled to render military service in person, upon paying an equivalent." This was apparently superseeded by Benson's motion to strike out "but no person" through "bear arms," which the COWH disagreed to, 24-22. On the same day, a motion by Burke to insert the following at this point was disagreed to, by a majority of 13: "A standing army of regular troops in time of peace, is dangerous to public liberty, and such shall not be raised or kept up in time of peace but from necessity, and for the security of the people, nor then without the consent of two-thirds of the members present of both houses, and in all cases the military shall be subordinate to the civil authority." The House, on August 20, agreed to a motion to insert "in person" at this point.

3. On September 4, by a recorded vote of 9-6, the Senate disagreed to a motion to insert the following at this point: that standing armies, in time of peace, being dangerous to Liberty, should be avoided as far as the circumstances and protection of the community admit; and that in all cases the military should be under strict subordination to, and governed by the civil Power. That no standing army or regular troops shall be raised in time of peace, without the consent of two thirds of the Members present in both Houses, and that no soldier shall be inlisted for any longer term than the continuance of the war.

4. Eleven articles were proposed in this committee report, with the advisory that they be sent to the legislatures of the several states to be adopted by them as amendments of the Constitution of the United States. The 'natural rights' mentioned in this report include; "rights of conscience in matters of religion; of acquiring property, and of pursuing happiness & safety; of Speaking, writing and publishing their Sentiments which decency and freedom; of peaceably Assembling to consult their common good, and of applying to the Government by petition or remonstrance for redress of grievances. Of these rights therefore they Shall not be deprived by the government of the united States." No mention of keeping and bearing is made in the document. According to the footnote in 'Creating the Bill of Rights', "This document is apparently Sherman's proposal to the House select committee, showing how Madison's amendments could be revised and placed at the end of the Constitution."

5. The paper is in bad condition, the words in brackets are from historian Charles Campbell's pre-Civil War transcript in the Hugh Blair Grigsby Papers, Virginia Historical Society. There are only two mentions of a standing army, but his view of the real strength of the rights in amendment is interesting.

http://www.constitution.org/mil/militia_debate_1789.htm

********************************************************************************

Rep. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts: “Whenever governments mean to invade the rights and liberties of the people, they always attempt to destroy the militia, in order to raise an army upon their ruins.” (spoken during floor debate over the Second Amendment, I Annals of Congress at 750, August 17, 1789.)

Rep. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts: “What, sir, is the use of a militia? It is to prevent the establishment of a standing army, the bane of liberty.” Rep. of Massachusetts, I Annals of Congress at 750 (August 17, 1789).

President James Madison: “…to support the Constitution, which is the cement of the Union, as well in its limitations as in its authorities; to respect the rights and authorities reserved to the States and to the people as equally incorporated with and essential to the success of the general system;… to keep within the requisite limits a standing military force, always remembering that an armed and trained militia is the firmest bulwark of republics – that without standing armies their liberty can never be in danger, nor with large ones safe;…” – President James Madison, First Inaugural address, Saturday, March 4, 1809.

James Madison: “As the greatest danger to liberty is from large standing armies, it is best to prevent them by an effectual provision for a good militia.” (notes of debates in the 1787 Federal Convention)

Thomas Jefferson: “I do not like [in the new Federal Constitution] the omission of a Bill of Rights providing clearly and without the aid of sophisms for… protection against standing armies.” –Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, 1787. ME 6:387

Thomas Jefferson: “Nor is it conceived needful or safe that a standing army should be kept up in time of peace for [defense against invasion].” –Thomas Jefferson: 1st Annual Message, 1801. ME 3:334

Thomas Jefferson: “The spirit of this country is totally adverse to a large military force.” –Thomas Jefferson to Chandler Price, 1807. ME 11:160

Thomas Jefferson: “The Greeks and Romans had no standing armies, yet they defended themselves. The Greeks by their laws, and the Romans by the spirit of their people, took care to put into the hands of their rulers no such engine of oppression as a standing army. Their system was to make every man a soldier and oblige him to repair to the standard of his country whenever that was reared. This made them invincible; and the same remedy will make us so.” –Thomas Jefferson to Thomas Cooper, 1814. ME 14:184

Thomas Jefferson: “Bonaparte… transferred the destinies of the republic from the civil to the military arm. Some will use this as a lesson against the practicability of republican government. I read it as a lesson against the danger of standing armies.” –Thomas Jefferson to Samuel Adams, 1800. ME 10:154

 

http://politicalinquirer.com/2008/05/27/the-congress-holds-the-war-powers/

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 15:36 | Link to Comment Agent P
Agent P's picture

JW, I appreciate the history lesson (honestly).  I've heard some of the more famous quotes associated with this before, but had never seen this much detail on the debate.

That being said, what is your opinion on how this might unfold should the type of protests we're seeing in North Africa ever come to America's shores? 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 15:44 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

I will defend my fellow country men who demonstrate. I am not alone, there will be no shooting into un-armed crowds anywhere I am standing. I shoot back, for the people of course.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 15:58 | Link to Comment Agent P
Agent P's picture

Do you think the military (at least in the majority) will uphold the oath if it comes to fighting against their fellow countrymen?  I've always wondered about this.

Also, just so we're clear, I was not trying to send an anti-gun message in my original post.  Not sure if you took it that way.  I'm a firm believer in the right to keep and bear arms.  However, I live in Illinois, so I only get to keep them, not bear them.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 23:44 | Link to Comment Heavy
Heavy's picture

Thank you; I love the comments section here.  Great history lesson.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 15:35 | Link to Comment sgt_doom
sgt_doom's picture

Listen everyone, I saw this post at another site and wish to sternly warn everyone against such an activity:

OK, now a lot of people have been wondering how Egypt managed to isolate itself on the Web. There are principally two ways this is done, first physically forcing the individual ISPs (ASN level) to halt all in and out-going IP traffic, but the second way is probably how they accomplished it. Let this be a warning to all who try.

They would have had the site which is their top-domain registry, or .eg registry, perform editing of their country's web sites by removing the terminating "." to DNS records in the .eg zone.

(That is, deleting the "." following the lower level sites, indicating no ".eg" was to follow.)

As an example, were one to evilly hack into Sweden's .se country registry (www.iis.se), and remove the terminating "." after the main ASN sites, no IP traffic would be incoming or outgoing for that country.

As an example, were one to evilly hack into the United Kingdom's .uk country registry (www.nominet.org.uk), and remove the terminating "." after the main ASN sites, no IP traffic would be incoming or outgoing for that country.

As an example, were one to evilly hack into Switzerland's .ch country registry (www.switch.ch/all), and remove the terminating "." after the main ASN sites, no IP traffic would be incoming or outgoing for that country.

Now, this is assuredly against the law, so be warned not do undertake any such operation --- even if the global banking elite manages to have Assange of Wikileaks illegally extradited to Sweden to be later removed to some extreme rendition site.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 10:59 | Link to Comment youngman
youngman's picture

Obama is right out on front of this...I just heard him speak about it.....oops..no it was not about the middle east..it was about Apple and Netflix......with a little Google thrown in

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:00 | Link to Comment Caviar Emptor
Caviar Emptor's picture

hehe he equated Thomas Edison with Sergei Brin during SOTU

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:03 | Link to Comment Overpowered By Funk
Overpowered By Funk's picture

Obama's internet kill switch has apparently killed the NASDAQ feed. Awesome!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:15 | Link to Comment Dapper Dan
Dapper Dan's picture

I still can not get a NASDAQ quote on any site. 9:19 CDT

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:19 | Link to Comment Overpowered By Funk
Overpowered By Funk's picture

Just wait till you start getting Twiiter posts in the Nasdaq feed - the world wide web is tangled.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:01 | Link to Comment Ragnarok
Ragnarok's picture

It's almost as if this is happening by design.  The Military Industrial Complex and the Central Bankers have been playing these games for a long time.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:06 | Link to Comment Sean7k
Sean7k's picture

Webster Tarpley wrote a piece a couple of weeks ago about this and the CIA. Seemed a stretch at the time, but wow, it appears he nailed it.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:29 | Link to Comment DV8
DV8's picture

Sean7k,

You have link to that article?

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:36 | Link to Comment DV8
DV8's picture

Thank you

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:08 | Link to Comment chumbawamba
chumbawamba's picture

There's something about Webster that I don't trust.  I learned long ago that when someone gives an obvious tell, you'd be a fool to ignore it.

Webster calls Austrian economists "crackpots".  I find his criticism of Austrian economics to be contrived and lacking.

The tell is obvious.  His agenda is not (yet).

I am Chumbawamba.

Sat, 01/29/2011 - 00:00 | Link to Comment Heavy
Heavy's picture

Seems to me that a set of revolutions with such a strong generational bent are unlikely to support stronger US ties and conflicts with neighbors.  That's why that interm PM got the boot in Tunisisa, that's why more and more Egyptians are in the streets.  Hell, this is in the ZH posts bar at the moment http://www.zerohedge.com/article/america-has-long-supported-egypts-dicta... , and Egyptian revolutionaries know all about US support of their government.  This is not a CIA plan to use wikileaks to strengthen our proxies for conflicts.  Wikileaks may still be CIA tied (I could never figure it out either way, so I'm still figuring both ways), who knows, but not for this purpose.  Actually an article this weak could be meant to discredit the idea of CIA-Wikileaks ties....where did I put my tin foil hat, I know its here somewhere, saw it while I was preparing for those solar storms.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:29 | Link to Comment Eager learner
Eager learner's picture

double post

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:29 | Link to Comment Eager learner
Eager learner's picture

Yeah it does seem orchestrated. Like the 25 page ‘Leaflet’ circulating in Egypt talking about what buildings to target and how to break police lines.

But I just can’t see how this benefits the USA or Israel. Why roll the dice when you have pliant established regimes in place. The last democratic election in the middle east election produced Hamas. Lebanon looks likely to produce more of the same.

This would seem to potentially benefit Iran or China more than the U.S. Unless the U.S. plans a ‘peacekeeping’ mission in several Islamic countries at once.

What’s the end game?

BTW this site is pretty good for updates on the Egypt situation. http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:19 | Link to Comment Drag Racer
Drag Racer's picture

But I just can’t see how this benefits the USA or Israel.

Look beyond the state level to the global plan. Read the goals of the CFR for the middle east.

Egypt military leaders are in Washington and CFR reps. in Egypt as all this goes down.

http://blogs.cfr.org/cook/

http://pomed.org

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:55 | Link to Comment dark pools of soros
dark pools of soros's picture

I agree -- articles say that Egypt has been having protest for years but now it is allowed to escalate?  Probably just a systematic laundry of old puppets for new shiny soon-to-be-bought 'hope and changers'    

 

They tested this out with Obama and are now deploying to other markets...

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:01 | Link to Comment themosmitsos
themosmitsos's picture

Tyler, I can guarantee you we've got a no-go so far in Egypt. :(

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment tmosley
tmosley's picture

Please elaborate.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:09 | Link to Comment Bob
Bob's picture

Military forces rolling in, satellite broadcasts being blocked, tourists in 5 star hotels being stripped of their cameras.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:09 | Link to Comment ColonelCooper
ColonelCooper's picture

I think you had better wait and see which side the army takes before you make any more predictions.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:15 | Link to Comment Confused
Confused's picture

A reasonable statement. Judging by the way police act, why would we believe military would behave any differently? 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:22 | Link to Comment ColonelCooper
ColonelCooper's picture

When the first army vehicle showed up in Cairo, it was cheered by the protesters.  Coup perhaps?  Way too early to tell.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:57 | Link to Comment dark pools of soros
dark pools of soros's picture

one thing different with Egypt is that $2bil a year military funnel ..  lots of sides do not want to lose that money drip

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:36 | Link to Comment Eager learner
Eager learner's picture

For what it's worth:Police reportedly refuse to antagonize protesters in Alexandria

http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/news/police-reportedly-refuse-antagonize...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:01 | Link to Comment Ben Probanke
Ben Probanke's picture

emir of kuwait has decided free food for all kuwaitis for next 14 months...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:04 | Link to Comment Rodent Freikorps
Rodent Freikorps's picture

He can afford it.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:09 | Link to Comment Caviar Emptor
Caviar Emptor's picture

They must be scared sh*tless !

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:23 | Link to Comment Oh regional Indian
Oh regional Indian's picture

Well, there is a signal right there, if he can pull it off.
As I understand, Kuwait is a net importer of food and foodgrains.
ORI

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:01 | Link to Comment the not so migh...
the not so mighty maximiza's picture

This is all priced in, i guess.

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:02 | Link to Comment AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

I found a list of 17 currencies that are pegged to the USD.

 

 Netherlands Antillean guilder, Aruban florin, Jordanian dinar, Bahrain's dinar, Lebanon's pound, Oman's rial, Qatar's rial, the Saudi riyal, Emirati dirham, Maldivian rufiyaa, Venezuelan bolivar, the Belize dollar, the Bahamian dollar, the Hong Kong dollar, the Barbados dollar, the Trinidad and Tobago dollar, and the Eastern Caribbean dollar.

It should also be reminded that countries trying to acquire gold/Euro/Yen or stuff like that are losening their link to the USD through diversification.

So far, the accusation of pegging currency is a posteriori observation.
Countries that go through troubles go through because of an alledged peg to the dollar.
Of course, that could not be because of the US monetary action, irrespectively for peg or not peg.

 

So provide a list of pegged currencies so that predictions can be made  before observation.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment topcallingtroll
topcallingtroll's picture

The unofficial pegs must be listed too. If a currency follows in virtual lockstep with the dollar then it is pegged whether or not it is.a written official policy.k

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:13 | Link to Comment AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

The list must be provided.

I am not the one making wild claims on pegged currencies and countries and stuff.

So provide a list of 'unofficial' pegs so that we can move from a posteriori surmises to predictions.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:00 | Link to Comment sushi
sushi's picture

That request will not help.

 

He is all posterior.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:18 | Link to Comment Ragnarok
Ragnarok's picture

Don't forget about the countries which are dollarized, Panama etc.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:18 | Link to Comment shortus cynicus
shortus cynicus's picture

Tim Geithner is laying fucker, has told that unpeg would help.

It has nothing to do with peg. Row food is relatively small market so it may be easily disturbed by FED & Co with teirs free money.

Food prices had increased much more than USD index has fallen.

Since September USD Index has fallen ~4%, wheat futures rose ~20%.

24% difference can not be undone by removing peg.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:39 | Link to Comment Things that go bump
Things that go bump's picture

Someone is using their ill-gotten gains to speculate in the foodstuffs of the people.  

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:04 | Link to Comment Thunder Dome
Thunder Dome's picture

Tell me lies.  Tell me sweet little lies.

 

S&P 1400

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:03 | Link to Comment topcallingtroll
topcallingtroll's picture

Yeah . I have been overweight energy and starting to get concerned. Blocked highways, people afraid to leave their homes....it is a real killer of gasoline demand.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:05 | Link to Comment Dr. No
Dr. No's picture

You are missing the cause and effect.  Riots ensued in Egypt, then internet was shut down.  Internet was shut down in Syria to see if riots ensue.

This is a NSA experiment to see the effects if internet was shut down in the US.  Kind of like Pizza Hut doing a market study in a small market like New Zealand prior to a big US launch.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Nothing can beat field testing.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:17 | Link to Comment Confused
Confused's picture

Certainly not the craziest idea. There might be something to this. 

 

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:51 | Link to Comment Dr. No
Dr. No's picture

I Apologize for the mediocre thought process.  Typically I can easily come up with the craziest idea.  I have been slipping.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:19 | Link to Comment topcallingtroll
topcallingtroll's picture

Dr. No you need to.comment more. It reminds me.how.funny the comments used to be in the old days. Zero hedge has a great group of comedians. You just made me laugh and put off my death from heart disease a little longer. Laugh more love more and may a ten bagger be in your future.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:23 | Link to Comment bob_dabolina
bob_dabolina's picture

I've been thinking the same thing.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:34 | Link to Comment Smiley
Smiley's picture

The amount of data people process these day due to the Internet is HUGE compared to even 50 years ago: It makes the mind turn and turn.  Take away the Internet and the turning mind has no outlet except the real world outside, and now the body goes for a ride as well.  Now you have lots of angry people thinking about the same thing congregating in large groups; whats the worst thing that can happen?

Not sure if an intel agency is pulling the strings but if they are:  It sure beats the shit out of having to invade someone.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:41 | Link to Comment Things that go bump
Things that go bump's picture

Web bots are predicting it goes down on or about February 8 and stays down for months.    

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:05 | Link to Comment bunkermeatheadp...
bunkermeatheadprogeny's picture

Despite neighboring unrest, Tel Aviv Stock Exchange continues to go up:

 

http://www.tase.co.il/TASEEng/Homepage.htm

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

Some kind of Kosher-Pomo?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:15 | Link to Comment bunkermeatheadp...
bunkermeatheadprogeny's picture

The TASE actually parallels the DOW's artificial inflation ever since QE2 was announced.

Look at the TASE yearly chart on the link I put up above.

If the Pauls' ever get a full audit of the Fed, I bet Ben bought billions in GBS's (Gefilte Fish Backed Securities)

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:15 | Link to Comment jus_lite_reading
jus_lite_reading's picture

That is Ben Shalom Israel Bernak's POMO at work- after all, he's got to keep the money in the family.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:06 | Link to Comment WineSorbet
WineSorbet's picture

It does seem a bit fishy that all these revolts, if they succeed, would benefit the western interests.  Am I incorrect in that assumption? 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:12 | Link to Comment Bob
Bob's picture

Completely incorrect.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:15 | Link to Comment WineSorbet
WineSorbet's picture

Fair enough but can you explain why?  It seems Mohamed ElBaradei is very pro-west and pro democracy.  Not sure about the other countries.  Just looking for some anaylsis.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:22 | Link to Comment Bob
Bob's picture

Sure, ElBaradei is a US pawn, but there's a very high risk that he won't take over, intentions notwithstanding.  Middle Easterners by now distrust puppets promoted by Western interests.   Popular uprisings in the Middle East overwhelmingly tend to produce Islamic republics that are not pro-US. 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:35 | Link to Comment gmrpeabody
gmrpeabody's picture

That's not necessarily a given in Egypt.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:40 | Link to Comment Bob
Bob's picture

Islamic is not certain, but antipathy to US seems to be.  Ameriphilia is road kill worldwide . . . and it rotted in the ditch in the ME long, long ago. 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:58 | Link to Comment gmrpeabody
gmrpeabody's picture

The antipathy goes without saying, and we've earned that. But peoples of this world often find themselves with bed partners that are less than desirable.

The enemy of my enemy is my friend.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:18 | Link to Comment Rodent Freikorps
Rodent Freikorps's picture

The enemy of my enemy is my enemy's enemy.

Nothing more.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:51 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

unless... that enemy can cook good bar b que... then something would have to give, lol!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 13:54 | Link to Comment Calmyourself
Calmyourself's picture

Ribs, mmm

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 14:08 | Link to Comment JW n FL
JW n FL's picture

I will not give up under gun point... but I will put my guns down to eat... food for thought, I think it works that way for most of us...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:37 | Link to Comment flacon
flacon's picture

Is being "pro west" such a good thing? In a democracy the "majority rules" - and in the next few years I shudder to think what the "majority" is going to do to people like US who have prepared and saved food, money, ammunition etc. They will probably make it illegal to "hoard" food - all in the name of "compassion" of course.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:45 | Link to Comment MachoMan
MachoMan's picture

Because whoever takes over is not likely to do anything other than flip the bird to international creditors...  If this means you progress from the stone age again, then so be it...  but sentiment will have changed to facilitate this potentiality.

Further, given these countries would presumably do their damndest to shun western interests, I cannot fathom that the dollar would be the widely accepted medium of exchange...  essentially, those countries with dollar oil pegs would be forced to depeg and adopt an alternative (probably not the euro either) given they would not have the security infrastructure to fend off the flood.  [hence why their leaders flee to parts unknown with the real national currency].

There is no question as to whether this is good or bad for western interests.  The only question is what our response will be, hopefully not agressive.  I sincerely doubt we have the resources to stop this type of contagion for very long...  simply put, there are only so many puppets we have on standby, only so many bombs on the shelf, and only so many boots we can keep on the ground...  the technological infrastructure isn't there to be able to send robots to police either...  they have limited payloads and there are not enough resources to spit them out in time.  Once a thought takes hold...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:32 | Link to Comment Ignatius J Reilly
Ignatius J Reilly's picture

I can't comment on the fishy-ness, but the first thought I had was that the US could benefit via war profiteering.

Sell arms to all of them and we'll be out of our deficit in no time.

And what could go wrong with arming all these people?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:06 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

Hahaaa, Israel is shitting in their pants. Finally a little bit of a reality check for them. Not that I am a fan of the Arabs, but the cockiness of the Israelis is just as irritating.

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:09 | Link to Comment alexwest
alexwest's picture

true true.. reading my head..
axl

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:24 | Link to Comment Triggernometry
Triggernometry's picture

+1 ark of the covenant

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment luckySword
luckySword's picture

It's not true, internet on Syria still working 

(I'm with friend and family on syria online now)

but seems to be sooner or later they will shutdown the internet.. 

and the SMS services but not yet!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment alexwest
alexwest's picture

well well well

in wildest dreams US gov/FED/ treasury would have never thought that Q-easing (aka money printing) would lead to fall of Us supporded regimes around ISRAEL, thus making IRAN solely super power in region.. thus making life for ISrael pretty damn hard..

i'd guess Benny/Buh sr-jr/Clinton/Obama are pulling their hair...
amazing ... Mr lunatic 'Mahmoud Ahmadinejad' probably laughing all way ...

alx

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:13 | Link to Comment buzzsaw99
buzzsaw99's picture

Maybe there is a God. This is a sweet outcome. Just desserts for the joo bankers.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:18 | Link to Comment ageofreason
ageofreason's picture

Since when was Syria a US supported regime???

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:39 | Link to Comment gmrpeabody
gmrpeabody's picture

No kidding...,

Some of these posts are really coming from the hip.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:07 | Link to Comment DonnieD
DonnieD's picture

Mubarak has been rigging elections for 30 years, uses a brutal police force against his people, and is grooming his son to take his place. He is a dictator. And the freedom espousing United States still supports this guy? Joe Biden was just on quoted yesterday as saying the protesters were "illegitimate"? The only thing that is illegitimate is the integrity of the US government.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:21 | Link to Comment buzzsaw99
buzzsaw99's picture

mubarak is a zionist puppet.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:26 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

You mean like President O.?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:40 | Link to Comment buzzsaw99
buzzsaw99's picture

You mean Toby in the WH? Yessah massah!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:47 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

It's all really kinda funny. The Prez is actually and really a muslim. If you father was a muslim (and he was) so is the son, like it or not. So we were all hoodwinked in that respect. But it seems like he has more Jewish staff and appointees than anybody before him. How ironic.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 20:58 | Link to Comment Hedge Jobs
Hedge Jobs's picture

its not really ironic once you understand who runs the country.

Obama himself is a jewish appointee to the US presidency.

Sun, 01/30/2011 - 16:41 | Link to Comment Dr. Sandi
Dr. Sandi's picture

Those damned jooz. Always appointing their Muslim buddies to the good jobs. Same as it ever was.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:35 | Link to Comment Triggernometry
Triggernometry's picture

A succinct, on-point analysis

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:07 | Link to Comment sushi
sushi's picture

Couldn't we vote Joe Biden in as Mubarak's replacement. Might solve a lot of problems.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:08 | Link to Comment bhakta
bhakta's picture

This is going to happen in Thailand too I feel. The power and money is all concentrated in a few super-families and the common people are sick of it. With the price of rice and all other simple foods going through the roof, petrol rising every day, the common people are not happy.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:39 | Link to Comment chindit13
chindit13's picture

Thailand will hold off until the current highly revered monarch---the only monarch 99.9% of the population has ever known---passes, which could come at any time.  Then, you might want to avoid Thai air space as the social upheaval tears the place apart.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:11 | Link to Comment Ratscam
Ratscam's picture

Army moved into Kairo - well recepted by the protesters - not confirmed yet

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:09 | Link to Comment Racer
Racer's picture

They want to close the Suez canal so they can get more work for the tankers!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:08 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

It's the end of the world as we know it... I feel fine...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:11 | Link to Comment Double down
Double down's picture

Getting closer to Iran

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:12 | Link to Comment assumptionblindness
assumptionblindness's picture

"...surely a reason for WTI to plunge another 20%."

No kidding.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:14 | Link to Comment Caviar Emptor
Caviar Emptor's picture

Globalism is threatened from all sides. That's not even going to be negotiable. There's too much bitterness and anger, too much privilege on one side, too much despair on the other. 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:17 | Link to Comment bunkermeatheadp...
bunkermeatheadprogeny's picture

Ahh, the Tower of Babel looking more like the Tower of Pisa every day.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:44 | Link to Comment flacon
Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:46 | Link to Comment MayIMommaDogFac...
MayIMommaDogFace2theBananaPatch's picture

+10

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:38 | Link to Comment nonclaim
nonclaim's picture

Globalism is threatened from all sides.

Well, the three main forces (Globalists, Islamists and Communists) are attacking each other more openly. Considering the battleground, for now the Globalists have the upper hand... for now.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:14 | Link to Comment satansanus
satansanus's picture

sell VOD

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:16 | Link to Comment crosey
crosey's picture

Beginning to wonder if the ancient Mayans were ever visited by a certain professor driving a DeLorean.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:19 | Link to Comment ageofreason
ageofreason's picture

It was Biff Tannon!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:07 | Link to Comment crosey
crosey's picture

Biff sure as hell would do something like this.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:21 | Link to Comment ageofreason
ageofreason's picture

(sorry for the double pump action)

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:21 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

"Headline: Dr. Emmet Brown returns from the future to actual reality to warn of impending doom by rampant mutant FED-Borg cyber men"

 

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:29 | Link to Comment slewie the pi-rat
slewie the pi-rat's picture

w/ eric cartman!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:17 | Link to Comment Stoploss
Stoploss's picture

I would be watching mobile phone services. Shutting down the internet is one thing, but, shutting down the mobile services immediately isolates everyone. that's when the wheels come off...

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:37 | Link to Comment Dr. Sandi
Dr. Sandi's picture

There's still a CB rig in the old Camaro. Think it works too.

10-4 on that, Good Buddy.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:06 | Link to Comment AmCockerSpaniel
AmCockerSpaniel's picture

Same for ham radio too.

73's de WD4DZH

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:17 | Link to Comment williambanzai7
williambanzai7's picture

Is the planet starting to wobble? How was the fondue at the JPM party last night?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:18 | Link to Comment Xibalba
Xibalba's picture

This will be the spark for WWIII

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:19 | Link to Comment bunkermeatheadp...
bunkermeatheadprogeny's picture

Go long short-wave radios.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:23 | Link to Comment nonclaim
nonclaim's picture

Yes, I think we'll see a revival of SW stations.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:22 | Link to Comment The Count
The Count's picture

I AM GOING TO MY LOCAL GUN STORE TO BUY MORE AMMO!

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:22 | Link to Comment tony bonn
tony bonn's picture

this is just the cia warming up for the usa.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:23 | Link to Comment Miramanee
Miramanee's picture

I have said it for along long time: the arrogance of the neo-classicalists is that they believe that human beings follow the rules of data sets and logarithms. DIS-equilibrium is now the rule:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbMq1WWUXc8

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:23 | Link to Comment almost_have_a_name
almost_have_a_name's picture

I don't know if Jorden will shut off the net, but Jordan Page just had a second revolutionary child.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_M_IO25xHg&feature=player_embedded

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:24 | Link to Comment SimpleSimon
SimpleSimon's picture

Who cares?  As long as the road to peace that runs through Damascus is still open....

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:27 | Link to Comment Oh regional Indian
Oh regional Indian's picture

Such a fascinating cause/effect thing to watch unravel.
Pretty sure paper tigers are starting to feel the burn? Huh?
ORI

http://aadivaahan.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/a-ha-ahahaha/

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:29 | Link to Comment Kina
Kina's picture

Ramesses II will be spinning in his sarcophagus.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:28 | Link to Comment bunkermeatheadp...
bunkermeatheadprogeny's picture

Worldwide revolt is coming, elites have already fled.

Davos was the perfect excuse to leave with planes filled with gold.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:32 | Link to Comment Bill Lumbergh
Bill Lumbergh's picture

Would BO cut the Internet in the middle of a BSB POMO?

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 12:24 | Link to Comment oddjob
oddjob's picture

That would invlove Barry O and his Ho getting off the crack pipe.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:35 | Link to Comment steve from virginia
steve from virginia's picture

Hmmm ...

Too early to tell what the outcome will be in Egypt. The key is what the Egyptian military does. If they decide to support elBaradei the game is over for Mubarack. Of course, nothing will change for the man on the street in Egypt.

How can it, unless someone can import 'Bankers from Mars' with money to be handed out to the ordinary folks.

As for the rest of the ME, it is hard to see dictators giving up without fights. Instructive is Iran where 'democracy' (read 'consumer') movements were crushed. Even Algeria has its 'unpleasantness' well in hand. Remember, all these countries have long experience dealing with dissidents as well as well- armed and well- trained organized jihadi resistance movements (Muslim Brotherhood, al Qaeda, Islamic Salvation Front, etc.).

Militant groups gaining political influence is effective: Hezbollah in Lebanon but even this does not guarantee change in political outcomes. See US failure in Iraq to supplant Saddam, Israeli failure in Gaza to uproot Hamas. Political survivors in ME are tough and experienced ... hard to topple.

None of this solves any problems which orbit around high fuel prices effecting food prices along with climate disruption (AGW). There are too many people, too many cars and too many cows. The human race is cannibalizing itself. The GFC created a zero- sum world economy which liabilities are starting to be felt.

Changing the color of the stripe on the pantleg of the dictator does nothing to address the 'too many' problem.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:36 | Link to Comment apberusdisvet
apberusdisvet's picture

Gold rallying; change your underwear Blythe; your shit DOES stink.

Fri, 01/28/2011 - 11:44 | Link to Comment MGA_1
MGA_1's picture

Hmm... wonder what next?  Syria, Jordon, Saudi Arabia, -Iraq- ?

I was thinking a couple months back that the only thing that will stop the current course of money printing would be inflation of some type... wonder if we're seeing that come to pass....

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!