Pictures From A Violent (And Media Blacked Out) Greek Exhibition

Tyler Durden's picture

Some may accuse us of simply recycling the same post over and over, with pictures of what appears like periodic violent rioting in Athens. Trust us: these are brand new, and the main reason why there is a seemingly massive media blackout of the events in Greece is because the journalists themselves are on strike. Luckily, the WSJ has compiled the following selection of pictures showing just how ugly the reality in an otherwise civilized European country has become. And since much of the proposed next round of austerity spending cuts would come from reducing wage costs in the
public sector, cuts in operating expenses at state-owned enterprises,
and reduced defense and health-care spending, the vicious cycle of ever more violent demonstrations will continue as even more cuts are implemented, and as the true depths of the Greek economic depression become self-evident.

Young protester ran as riot police hit others during clashes in Athens on Wednesday. A largely peaceful protest by tens of thousands of Greeks was marred by violence late in the day.

Riot policemen ran through a cloud of tear gas to avoid fire from an exploding petrol bomb. Hundreds of youths wearing ski masks hurled water bottles, firecrackers and other objects at police who responded with tear gas and pepper spray.

Tens of thousands people filled the streets in Athens for a demonstration.

Demonstrators shouted slogans during the protest in Athens. The strike, the second to be called this year, comes just days before the government is due to present Parliament with €26 billion in further spending cuts and tax increases to slash the budget deficit over the next five years.

Transport services also were disrupted, with ferry and rail services suspended after dockworkers joined the strike.

Public transportation around the capital operated on a reduced schedule, and flight operations were hit by a four-hour walkout by air-traffic controllers.

Protesters fought with riot police during the demonstrations.

Journalists also joined in the strike, leading to a blackout of all radio and television news programs.

Protesters lay on the street after clashes with riot police

In May last year, Greece narrowly avoided default with the help of a €110 billion bailout from the EU and the IMF in exchange for measures to cut its bloated budget deficit and reform its economy.

A demonstrator kicked a riot police.

Riot police clashed with demonstrators. Much of the spending cuts would come from reducing wage costs in the public sector, cuts in operating expenses at state-owned enterprises, and reduced defense and health-care spending.

Demonstrators are arrested by riot police

A protester with his face covered in blood looked on during the clashes

A recent public opinion poll shows that Greece's socialist government enjoys some measure of support among the wider public for its reforms, which are seen as correcting decades of stifling overregulation in the economy and mismanagement in the public sector.