Refuting The SEC's Lies At The Core Of The "Flash Crash" Analysis

Tyler Durden's picture

It is time for the SEC to reissue their flash crash report, and to reconsider their Waddell and Reed scapegoating campaign. Why? Because apparently Schapiro's pawns never realized that the market is sufficiently intelligent to do a complete forensic analysis on W&R's trade into the flash crash, and to take the "regulator's" word for less than face value (after the Madoff catastrophe, what other option is there). We now have prima facie evidence that the SEC is lying. We wonder: just how many pieces of silver did it cost the HFT lobby to bribe Schapiro and her Princeton physicist (what is it about this university and the caliber of "talent" it generates?) Gregg Berman to skew the data so much it is beyond laughable. In our ongoing expose of what really happened on May 6, Zero Hedge is happy to have collaborated with both W&R and Nanex to bring our readers the full truth behind the flash crash. Here it is...

Straight from forensic trade experts: Nanex.

We have obtained the Waddell & Reed (W&R) trade executions in the June 2010 eMini futures contract for May 6, 2010. There were 6,438 trades totalling 75,000 contracts. We matched them by time, price and size to the 147,577 trades (844,513 contracts) in the CME time and sales data between 14:32 and 14:52 (they matched exactly). One-second resolution charts of the W&R trades along with other eMini trades are shown below in various time frames.

The SEC report identified a Sell Algorithm selling 75,000 contracts as the cause of the flash crash. If the "Sell Algorithm" in the SEC report refers to the Waddell & Reed trades, then there is a problem. A big one. Looking at the trades in context with the other trades during that time, they appear insignificant.  The W&R trades also do not occur near the ignition point (14:42:44.075) we identified earlier. Furthermore, the W&R trades are practically absent during the torrential sell-off that began at 14:44:20. The bulk of the W&R trades occurred after the market bottomed and was rocketing higher -- a point in time that the SEC report tells us the market was out of liquidity.

Something is very wrong here.

Since the money transferred in the flash crash is in the hundreds of billions, and since litigation will be inevitable, we would like to give Schapiro the right to defend her agency's findings in a public venue such as Zero Hedge before she has to do defend her misrepresentations of reality (and her reasons for doing so) in a court of law.