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Two Irradiated Fukushima Workers Hospitalized With Beta Ray Injuries

Tyler Durden's picture




 

The heroic but sad story of the Fukushima Fifty may be about to take a turn for the tragic. Two of the three workers involved in the dead end procedure to repower the plant's blown up cooling systems have been rushed to the hospital following radiation induced injuries to their feet. In yet another startling example of the stupidity of TEPCO, the injuries appear to have resulted after irradiated water has seeped into the protective suits. In other words, these are supposedly safe, and completely isolated radiation suits... that are not even watertight? Once again, we wonder just how long will the Fukushima restoration procedure be handled by senior level executives who continue to demonstrate beyond a responable doubt they have no idea what they are doing, except of course to cavalierly risk the lives of 50 or so people (who will soon be far less) with each and every hairbrained idea. And the cherry on top is that the exposure to the two was "only" 180 millisieverts: well below the "new normal" baseline safe threshold which as readers will recall was raised for no reason but to mandate the continued risking of innocent lives from 100 to 250 millisieverts a week ago.

From Kyodo:

Two of three workers who were laying cable at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on Thursday were exposed to high-level radiation and were hospitalized due to injuries to their feet, the nuclear safety agency and the plant operator said.

The three male workers were exposed to radiation amounting to 173 to 180 millisievert at around 12:10 p.m. while laying cable underground at the No. 3 reactor's turbine building. The two workers of plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s affiliated firm had their feet under water while carrying out the work, according to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

The two, who were diagnosed as having sustained beta ray burn injuries at a Fukushima hospital, will later be sent to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba Prefecture, the agency said.

TEPCO said radioactive water may have seeped through their radiation protective gear. The injuries are caused by direct exposure to beta rays, the utility added.

The level is lower than the maximum limit of 250 millisievert per year set by the health ministry for workers tackling the ongoing emergency at the Fukushima plant.

So far, one worker who was injured following a hydrogen explosion at the No. 3 reactor on March 14 was found to have been exposed to radiation amounting to over 150 millisievert.

 

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Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:48 | 1094395 johnnymustardseed
johnnymustardseed's picture

Again, I went to the dentist to day and had x rays so....

I'm turning Japanese
I think I'm turning Japanese
I really think so
Turning Japanese
I think I'm turning Japanese
I really think so

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:31 | 1094530 Harlequin001
Harlequin001's picture

My TV handset glows in the dark...

It was made in Japan...

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:51 | 1094409 Freewheelin Franklin
Freewheelin Franklin's picture

Don't you know that other kids are starving in Japan?

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcJjMnHoIBI

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:18 | 1094481 johnQpublic
johnQpublic's picture

WASHINGTON—Responding to the ongoing nuclear crisis in Japan, officials from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission sought Thursday to reassure nervous Americans that U.S. reactors were 100 percent safe and posed absolutely no threat to the public health as long as no unforeseeable system failure or sudden accident were to occur. "With the advanced safeguards we have in place, the nuclear facilities in this country could never, ever become a danger like those in Japan, unless our generators malfunctioned in an unexpected yet catastrophic manner, causing the fuel rods to melt down," said NRC chairman Gregory Jaczko, insisting that nuclear power remained a clean, harmless energy source that could only lead to disaster if events were to unfold in the exact same way they did in Japan, or in a number of other terrifying and totally plausible scenarios that have taken place since the 1950s. "When you consider all of our backup cooling processes, containment vessels, and contingency plans, you realize that, barring the fact that all of those safety measures could be wiped away in an instant by a natural disaster or electrical error, our reactors are indestructible." Jaczko added that U.S. nuclear power plants were also completely guarded against any and all terrorist attacks, except those no one could have predicted.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:38 | 1094551 Harlequin001
Harlequin001's picture

'our reactors are indestructible'

Sure they are. Let's just sit back for a moment and watch some indestructible Japanese ones self destruct shall we....

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:39 | 1094555 Bicycle Repairman
Bicycle Repairman's picture

" Jaczko added that U.S. nuclear power plants were also completely guarded against any and all terrorist attacks"

A full public discussion of this issue is overdue.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:44 | 1094558 johnQpublic
johnQpublic's picture

you guys do realize that entire paragraph is from the Onion news dont you?

its a joke....reread

 

harmless energy source that could only lead to disaster if events were to unfold in the exact same way they did in Japan, or in a number of other terrifying and totally plausible scenarios that have taken place since the 1950s.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 11:03 | 1095224 Poundsand
Poundsand's picture

Can't imagine why you got junked except that the level of intelligence at the site has dropped significantly over the last year.  Tyler needs to up the difficulty level for his questions.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 13:39 | 1095972 Bicycle Repairman
Bicycle Repairman's picture

My comment stands.  A thorough public review of security at these plants is long overdue.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:17 | 1094725 johnnymustardseed
johnnymustardseed's picture

It is a joke!! Stop junking me!

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:48 | 1094400 Republican Lackey
Republican Lackey's picture

Rubber boots?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:02 | 1094445 Big Corked Boots
Big Corked Boots's picture

Gore-tex?

WTF? - are these brave men truly expendable?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:42 | 1094556 Harlequin001
Harlequin001's picture

...with lead lined toe caps!

Your feet will never fit in those boots...

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:41 | 1094557 Thomas
Thomas's picture

Alas, yes.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:19 | 1094740 ToNYC
ToNYC's picture

Nano-Lead wetsuits is what we use in here to deal with Mother f(n) Nature and her bastard step-children's stupid tricks.

.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:52 | 1094410 Chinese Busboy
Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:53 | 1094411 Mike2756
Mike2756's picture

It looked like they were just wearing Tyvek suits.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:55 | 1094413 themosmitsos
themosmitsos's picture

Tyler, I dont know man. I dont think, nor does it seem that any big-wig, top-tier **scientists** are involved in this decision making process. So I dont know that they're being handled by top-level executives, because that's supposed to include smarty-pantses, not just "suits"

imo

Also, :(((((((

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:05 | 1094414 malikai
malikai's picture

180mSv isn't too bad. It will probably mean they get actual "radiation burn" on the exposed parts. Remember, the LD/50 for acute exposure is 5 Sv. So it was a serious, but probably not life threatoning dose, provided they didn't breathe or ingest the water. 

Caveat: This is assuming it was only beta that they were exposed to. In all likelyhood, however, if the water has any I131 in it, which is quite probable, they've probably gotten a good dose of gamma along with the beta. Their dosimeters will tell the story.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:30 | 1094522 TaxSlave
TaxSlave's picture

Apparently it's a Bad Thing when the dosage is concentrated to a small area of intimate contact -- like not wearing rubber boots when working in puddles.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:51 | 1094602 malikai
malikai's picture

My suspicion is that the workers are given good equipment. However, they are clearly overburdened, overworked, and being in an extremely dangerous environment, they are far more likely to make mistakes. I know that when I "burn the midnight oil" I make loads of ridiculous silly mistakes which I often realize the next day after a good night's rest. Fortunately for me, the mistakes I make are in lines of code which causes no bodily harm. I wish these guys had my problems.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:27 | 1095008 anonnn
anonnn's picture

During routine reactor refuel outtages, the standard is 6 consecutive weeks of 72 hrs each...higher allowed if crisis. After those 6 weeks, must drop below 72 hrs.

 

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:53 | 1094417 FischerBlack
FischerBlack's picture

You'd think, with the world watching, Japanese government and TEPCO officials would be going overboard on supplying these workers with the best of the best protective gear. When so much is out of your control, you make sure the things you can control are in hand firmly. What a joke.

 

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:19 | 1094493 MSimon
MSimon's picture

TEPCO is not in charge. PETCO is. A simple mix up any sufficiently advanced dyslexic can make.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:54 | 1094615 avonaltendorf
avonaltendorf's picture

Are you trying to be funny? Tokyo Electric Power Co = TEPCO

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:43 | 1094813 i-dog
i-dog's picture

FFS ... does everyone have to add "sarcasm alert" to their posts for the kids at the back of the bus?

[edit: I take it from your tag that english is not your first language but, please, take a breath before you post].

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:55 | 1094420 LongSoupLine
LongSoupLine's picture

I have done "Level A" radiation remediation.  The foot protection involves 3-4 layers of foot protection alone.

 

Something sounds wrong.  Either they were NOT wearing appropriate levels of protection, or, the radiation levels in the liquids and environment were beyond personal protective levels (read: put head between legs and kiss...)

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:27 | 1094510 LeBalance
LeBalance's picture

I agree.  I do not think the workers would have splashed through puddles in their bare tootsies.  It might be surmised that the conditions are deadly and that the "injuries" being described are a COVER story and not what is actually happening.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:55 | 1094423 destiny
Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:44 | 1094569 LongSoupLine
LongSoupLine's picture

destiny,

 

Care to provide us a "Cliff Notes" summary a'la English?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:17 | 1094728 Aerows
Aerows's picture

Essentially, there are rising radiation levels in the Northern Hemisphere, and there are contamination level numbers, but they are getting seized before they can be dessiminated to the public.  In other words, it's known how bad this is, but it's not being released.  I assume to prevent a panic.

 

I don't personally think the entire Northern Hemisphere is at risk - I think the problems, however, are far worse in Japan than they are letting on, and are doing everything they can to prevent panic and a mass exodus from Tokyo.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:53 | 1094862 i-dog
i-dog's picture

They also point out that the data that has been seized by the states (I assume they mean ALL european and north american states) has been paid for by the public and should be released to the public ... for the public's protection.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 12:46 | 1095014 destiny
destiny's picture

Longlinesoup

Translation of the French doc. posted earlier.

 

Document CRIIRAD COMMUNIQUE CRIIRAD 23 mars 2011 - 17h COLERE ET INDIGNATION – VOLET N°1 / PROTEST AND INDIGNATION The figures related to contamination of the air do exist but are confiscated by our governments. The publication of data from CTBTO as well as nuclear structures in North America would have informed us very precisely on air quality that would have enabled us to measure in an efficient way the risks levels well before the contaminated air mass reached Europe. CRIIRAD is making an INTERNATIONAL call, inviting citizens, associations, scientists, elected individuals…from all over the countries to mobilize themselves with us in order to demand that all the results of the radioactive contaminated air that were obtained with Public funds be made readily available to the public and be used to protect civil society. No Interpretable data for North America ! More than 10 days after the first radioactive rejections, contaminated air masses have crossed countries as large as the United States and Canada, countries that have at their disposal highly sophisticated instruments in order to measure the volumic activity of each radioactive nuclei present in the air, and in any case the most harmful elements to public health. But, despite research conducted for several days now, CRIIRAD has found NO figure on air contamination. Are available at this point only results on dose flows or emission levels on beta and gamma radiation that do not allow to evaluate risks levels. It is not even possible to establish a relation between elevation values and the contaminated air mass flow. CRII RAD will address, to all embassies of both of these countries, official requests, to publish the results currently detained by nuclear installations whether they are civil or military. Precision to be noted to that effect is that the current IRSN markers located in Saint Pierre et Miquelon, Martinique and Guadeloupe do not measure the radioactive level (doses expressed in µSv/h). These results do not allow to measure risks. INTERNATIONAL BLACK OUT Looking for measuring stations between Japan and France, the CRIIRAD Laboratory has turned to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network. www.ctbto.org (FYI : Volumic activity is expressed in Becquerel per m3 (Bq/m3). It indicated on the number of disintegrations that are produced by volume and time unit. A 15 Bq/m3 means that in a m3 of air, at each second, 15 radioactive atom kernels disintegrate with ionized radiation. This value decreases depending on the radioactive period of the nuclei. The period corresponds to the time at the end of which activity is divided by 2:8 days for iodine 131; 30 years for cesium 137 ; 2 years for cesium 134.) On the map showed in the french version of the document are displayed measuring stations throughout the world, recording different parameters in order to verify that NO underground nuclear test is being done in violation of the treaty dispositions (i.e. North Korea). They measure seismic data, Hydroacoustical data, infrasonic data and radionucleic data. Approximately 60 stations are equipped with radiologic laboratories (see map). They are able to measure minute levels of air contamination since one of their aims is precisely to measure contamination consecutive to atmospheric nuclear tests. These laboratories are equipped by systems of detection perfectly adapted to the identification and the quantification of radioactive products in contaminated air masses rejected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant. On Saturday March 19 2011, CRII RAD addressed a request to obtain results to Mrs. THUNBORG, in charge of Public Information at the OTICE. She answered on the following day that she was transferring our request to the division in charge of secure data ( “I have forwarded your request to the Division responsible for the Secure data. They will get back to you in regards to your inquiry. Best regards”, Annika THUNBORG, Spokesperson and Chief of Public Information, Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), UN, Vienna, Austria.) . The following Monday, CRII RAD was still awaiting an answer and renewed its request insisting on the URGENCY of the situation and specifying that without a diligent answer on their part, CRII RAD would publicly denounce the situation. Mme THUNBORG advised us by return to contact the french authorities and, concerned to help, orientated us towards articles where Austrian, Swedish and German institutions that have access to results, had let filter some of them. We obtained thereby some results much too scarce and impossible to use and correlate in time and space. Two hours later a mail from Mr. SCOTTI (UN), indicating that “data collected by the network of stations from STP cannot be communicated to correspondents (Center for National Data) designated by States that had signed the TICE. In France, the institution where such data are communicated is the CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique ). The Director of the laboratory CRIIRAD addressed on the same day to the CEA : « I would appreciate if you could let the CRII RAD know how to access the data collected by the different stations of the OTICE network, in particular concerning the radionuclei (namely Cs137 and 131, Sr 90, rare gases, tritium, transuranians). This would allow us to determine previsions on impacts from the Fukushima Plant and to answer to the concerns of the French population. The next day, the answer received from the CEA : no data will be communicated. The International network for measures abide by confidentiality rules strictly defined by the member states of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization network . Data are only divulged to National contact points designated by each state and which analyze strictly within the scope of that treaty, which is detect any nuclear test that would have been conducted in violation of the engagements of the states having ratified the TICE. In France, it is again the Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique (CEA), organization in charge of the development of civil and military nuclear activities. The answer further indicated that “following the accident in Fukushima, at the request of the member states, data on the radionucleid activity are transmitted to the IEAE and the World Health Organization (WHO). The teams in these two institutions in charge of all aspects for safety and radio protection can use the data in complement of those communicated by all the States in order to establish necessary evaluations to protect human life, susceptible to be concerned by the fall outs. NEITHER THE IAEA nor THE WHO have disclosed any of their results. The IAEA is actually in charge of PROMOTING Civil NUCLEAR ACTIVITY and the WHO which is technically in charge of public sanitation, has signed an agreement in 1959 stipulating that BOTH agencies will act jointly and in constant consultation. RESULT : Since 10 DAYS, the FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI plant continuously rejects radioactive products in the atmosphere, elements that are uncontrolled and un quantified. At the same time, Many stations dispersed all over the planet are measuring the radioactive levels in the air and follow step by step the evolution of the radioactivity in space and time.… BUT THEY ARE JEALOUSLY KEEPING DATA SECRET. Such situation is shocking in normal time, totally unacceptable in radiologic emergency time. More so unacceptable that the measure network is financed by PUBLIC FUNDS. States pledge up to 55 700 000 € to make these stations run and operated. The American citizens are breathing radioactive particles since MARCH 17 2011 rejected by the nuclear engines and irradiated combustible stocking pools of the Fukushima Daiichi plant. As First contributors of to the budget of the network, they will appreciate having strictly no data in exchange of their 12 million euro budget. A dupe market. To be noted that with a budget of 3 600 000 €, the French citizens are no better. CRIIRAD receives hundreds of calls from concerned and scared persons worrying for themselves, close ones and children. CRII RAD would like to properly inform them and if permitted reassure them, on solid bases, all its correspondents, in Normandy, Martinique or South Korea. CRII RAD invite all citizens, associations, scientists, elected persons, to mobilize together to obtain the breach to the secret on air contamination levels. A petition will be placed on line to collect signatures in France but everyone can relay the information and the mobilization abroad, to address authorities in their respective countries their protest on the situation.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:57 | 1094428 spanish inquisition
spanish inquisition's picture

They are probably wading through a sandbox of pellets.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:57 | 1094431 metastar
metastar's picture

CEOs would think twice it the rule of the sea were applied.

The captian goes down with the ship.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:02 | 1094442 malikai
malikai's picture

I like where you're going with this. Perhaps we could use TEPCO executives as temperature suppressants for the spent fuel pools. Surely there must be enough of them available to adequately cool the pools. While we're at it, perhaps some Westinghouse executives would be suitable for temperature suppressers for the reactors.

You may have just solved this dilema.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:13 | 1094468 Commander Cody
Commander Cody's picture

Not a good idea.  They would be a good ignition source.  Too much methane.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:45 | 1094575 Harlequin001
Harlequin001's picture

At the very least they should be in their plush offices 9 till 5...

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:14 | 1094465 Natasha Fatale
Natasha Fatale's picture

My sentiments exactly.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:11 | 1094695 Ferrari
Ferrari's picture

Isn't this precisely the crux of the world's problems, summed up in "other people's money?" It obviously applies to our so-called banking system. Rather than receiving huge compensation through good times & bad, let Lloyd & friends finance the bailout. But it will never happen. It's all public risk, private gain throughout Western Civ.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 07:59 | 1094435 h4rdware
h4rdware's picture

I am *fairly* sure this is connected with the footage I caught on last night's NHK loop (which seemed to be only shown once and not repeated?). Tried to record it but wasn't quick enough.

Something happened that caused alarms to go off, and workers to run for cover, described as hiding behind or below trucks. High radiation exposures (70mSv/h) were discussed by the newscaster over the footage. That's as much as I saw before it flipped back to earthquake news.

 

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:02 | 1094447 WALLST8MY8BALL
WALLST8MY8BALL's picture

It hit me like a gamma ray
Standing in a hurricane

I'm pulling out thorns
Smokestack lightning out my window
I want to know what I've lost today

Come on little gamma ray
Standing in a hurricane

Your body's bored
Like a refugee from a house that's burning
And the backwater's calling your name

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:03 | 1094450 Careless Whisper
Careless Whisper's picture

except of course to cavalierly risk the lives of 50 or so people

correction: risk the lives of 130 million people

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:10 | 1094460 gordengeko
gordengeko's picture

I don't think there is any question they are and have been lying to everyone about how dire the situation is there.  Tupac said it best...

"My only fear of death is coming back to this bitch reincarnated."

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:18 | 1094479 ZackAttack
ZackAttack's picture

If it was an American company, they'd cut them all off from the group health plan and strongarm the future widows into signing an indemnification agreement.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:21 | 1094496 TexDenim
TexDenim's picture

This is really the stuff of horror movies, and knowing the Japanese penchant for suppressing bad news, we are not going to hear much more about this. It's amazing that a nation that suffered the only civilian atomic bombing, and which is so earthquake prone, has embraced nuclear power so enthusiastically.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:30 | 1094521 Kina
Kina's picture

I think we can take it as read that any official information has been polished up before it arrives at a doorstep.

 

Official data x 3 = truth.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:35 | 1094541 E
E's picture

What happened to the story from the Mail that 5 workers were believed to be dead (quoted n the Fukushima Fifty story yesterday)?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:38 | 1094543 SWRichmond
SWRichmond's picture

Six.Hundred.Billion.Dollars.For.The.Markets.In.Five.Days

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:37 | 1094548 abc123
abc123's picture

I'm a Rad Worker.  Went through the training.  Been in the environment.  There's a radiation tag on the board with my name on it.

 

What you guys don't seem to understand is the safety systems are designed to prevent even the tiniest bit of radiation from touching a person.  These plants are normally tight and safe.  But this wasn't just any earthquake, remember?  These things routinely stand up to 7's and 8's.

 

So, could something more have been done?  NO.  Hear me? NOOO!!!  Because then the event that caused the spill would have been terrorism or a meteor or Godzilla. 

 

So to sum up, nothing ventured, nothing gained.  I don't think I should have to remind you, of all people, that life has a 100% mortality rate.

 

Admire the heroes and stop being such whiny little bitches.  You don't even understand the back story.

 

 

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:50 | 1094591 gordengeko
gordengeko's picture

+33, the suits only protect from alpha and beta particles.  They are still being irradiated by gamma and/or xray radiation tho.  The only protection from all radiation is time, distance and shielding.  ALARA, as low as reasonably achievable.  They are heroes and they also know the risks.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:45 | 1095093 anonnn
anonnn's picture

Do you not consider what is deliberately omitted from the media?...namely, ingestion of rad particles [radiation sources] internally...thru mouth,nose,eyes,ears, etc. There's no walking away from such, nor is there any effective measurement available, as internal alpha and beta cannot usually be detected from outside the body...and alpha very dangerous [see official, international weighting factors in the sievert and rem systems] even though won't penetrate a piece of paper.

Btw, 100 rem = 1 sievert [or 100mrem=1msievert]. Taint funny, Magee.

When does the unspeakable become realized?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:58 | 1094634 TexDenim
TexDenim's picture

Yes, I see what you're saying. But what is the backstory on the leaking boots? Are these things waterproof or not? Or do you think they snagged it on something and it sprang a leak? I do admire the heroism, but I'm curious about the procedures and the equipment.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:57 | 1094640 ExpendableOne
ExpendableOne's picture

I read a week or so ago that there were fuel rods stored on or around the reactors.  If true, what happend to those rods when the hydrogen explosions occured?  Perhaps that is the real issue here.  Theys guys are trying to make their way around a ruined industrial environment where bits of fuel rods have been blown.  That would explain exposure to the foot beyond what the suit can handle.  Storing the fuel rods on the reactors would also have been a high level management decision that few would want to own up to now.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:16 | 1094709 Blankman
Blankman's picture

abc - I want to call them heroes but I keep getting confused. What exactly are the heroes for? I am not trying to sound like a smart ass here I want to know what they are being heroes for doing?  Are they heroes for trying to reconnect a doomed nuclear plant that should just be buried under several feet of concrete?  In all honesty I would have more respect for them if they just said fuck it I am going home to my family because they need me more than Japan needs to have power for their damned television sets.  The plant is doomed.  Nothing is saving it.  Tepco just wants to try to get some of the reactors started to pump more power out to make more money and save face that these 50 who killed themselves did so for a reason.  Now these 50 guys are fucked.   

 

It just seems to me they are killing themselves so Japan can have electricity.  Bullshit.

 

Remember, these workers are expendable in the eyes of the corporate dictator.  That son of a bitch ceo crying on tv what an ass.  Fuck you too.     

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:15 | 1094716 Spigot
Spigot's picture

You might consider coming down a bit off your high horse. Your assumptions presume knowledge of the Japanese nuclear industry, culture as being equalivalent to your own regional experience...which may be incorrect. And you do not know who else is on this board. And you have your perspective from your indoctrination, which also limits your POV, IMO.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:35 | 1094785 Aerows
Aerows's picture

Be sure to tell the pregnant women and infants in the area, not to mention the young children that might want to have children of their own that they should stop being whiny bitches.  

 

There is a very real possibility that the people in Japan are being lied to about the risks involved with staying in the area.  That's my complaint about the situation.  These people working there are heroes, but the authorities working to obfuscate the dangers are the opposite.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:35 | 1094787 disabledvet
disabledvet's picture

first off "by all means enlighten us to the back story." no one afraid of the truth here.  second "something must be done now."  or are you "in the banana camp too"?

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:38 | 1094794 gall batter
gall batter's picture

Routinely????  There should be nothing routine about this.  Plus, if the strongest is a 10, then they should be built and safeguarded to stand up to a 10--for the worst possible event.  Not based on what's occurred in the past but covering the most devastating.   

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 13:45 | 1096008 Bicycle Repairman
Bicycle Repairman's picture

"I'm a Rad Worker."

I read "sock puppet" and stopped right there.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:49 | 1094598 Spigot
Spigot's picture

It all depends what kind of suits and what condition they are in now. I doubt that with all the devastation the suits are much more than rags at this point. Also, I'm pretty sure the people know they are doomed, and that whatever protective measures they are taking really are a matter of choosing how long they can remain effective in trying to forestall the worst case scenarios from occuring.

Their heroic acts in sacrificing their lives really must be matched by herculian efforts by those outside of the plants to arrange for better solutions...unfortunately there may be no better solutions at this point :-(

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 08:56 | 1094632 curbyourrisk
curbyourrisk's picture

If everything is so fucking safe, why aren't upper management and the OWNERS of the company not in there saving the rest of the world?  Man up CEO/PRESIDENT and get a suit on....get in there and show the world you truly are doing everything YOU can.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:10 | 1094692 orangedrinkandchips
orangedrinkandchips's picture

Once again, we wonder just how long will the Fukushima restoration procedure be handled by senior level executives who continue to demonstrate beyond a responable doubt they have no idea what they are doing.....

 

Tyler....I think you left out an Adjective here....as in "the fuck" placed inbetween What and They in the above sentense.

 

rock on

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:19 | 1094726 ihatecats
ihatecats's picture

what the world need is a reactor wall as strong as the bernankacide put.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 09:26 | 1094762 Spigot
Spigot's picture

Expletives hardly can express what we are seeing and how we feel about it. Mostly this is beyond words, even from a distance.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:10 | 1094920 Invisible Hand
Invisible Hand's picture

Do any of the people (in the media or at Zerohedge) know anything about the subject (reactors, radiation safety, risks of radiation exposure) about which they so eagerly and vociferously pontificate?

I have seen no evidence that they do (and I am a qualified expert in these fields and more currently in the medical uses of radiation).

These articles are pure fear mongering and conspiracy theories with little, or any, basis in scientific fact.

Personally, I am glad I am near the end of my life because living in a world where the idiots and charlatans (nuclear hysteria, global warming hysteria, GM food hysteria, dietary hysteria, etc., etc.) are the main stream media, science and political voices is just too distressing.

Future generations are going to starve in the dark and curse their ancestors for throwing away the technology that has made us the healthiest, longest lived, and most comfortable people who have ever lived. 

What has happened at the Japanese reactors after the 4th largest earthquake ever recorded and the resulting tsunami is a testament to modern engineering can accomplish and also how fragile all the works of man are in the face of nature.  In retrospect, the engineering had faults and can be improved upon in the future (if we have enough sense to continue to build reactors), the response has been less than perfect but after disaster of this magnitude that could not be anticipated or engineered for (can you auto withstand a 100 mph crash into a bridge abutment?-- it might not be possible to engineer it to do so, but if society insisted on it, no one could afford a car) you have to expect that there will be problems.  No technology is without risk.  However, the radiation levels I have seen in Japan are unlikely to have any health effects on members of the general public.  However the scare tactics of the press will probably cause deaths from anxiety all around the world.  Beta exposure to skin to radiation workers is not life or health threatening.  Limits on skin dose (such as beta exposure) are many times higher than whole body dose limits because this exposure, while it may produce skin redness, and even skin burns, has much less danger to current and future health.  These burns will heal as do burns from a fire (how many people were burned in the aftermath in this disaster--should all buildings be made totally fireproof in the face of this scale earthquake/tsunami).  Most anti-contamination clothing is not totally waterproof.  Was this exposure (to trained radiation workers) deemed acceptable due to the gravity of the situation?  If it was unanticipated, they need some good radiation safety people to assist the Japanese.  The US Navy can provide them.  Firemen run into burning buildings all the time.  They have protective equipment but it can not and does not protect them from everything they can encounter.  They get burned and die, it is part of the job.  Exposure to radiation is part of being a radiation worker.  Taking planned, reasonable risks in emergency situations to protect the public is also part of the job.  I have gone into reactor compartments in emergency situations myself.  A little scary but part of the job.

I am taking Zerohedge off my favorites.  This childish article is too much to bear.  Good luck to you all!

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:46 | 1095012 i-dog
i-dog's picture

You won't be missed as our "resident nuclear expert" ... here is what you had to say 2 weeks ago:

"Assuming the Japanese use up-to-date reactor designs, they have passive cooling systems that should keep the reactor core sufficiently cooled to prevent any fuel rod damage, even with broken pipes and loss of power.

There will not be any "fireworks."  A nuclear explosion is physically impossible."

You are nothing but a self-important, ignorant twit. 'Bye-eeeee.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:10 | 1094921 Jim in MN
Jim in MN's picture

I read this and think 'they are going to work until incapacitated'. 

I also think 'there is no plan as far as we know'.

The immediate question as regards worker safety is, what are the immediate, tactical options open to plant management and what are the risks and tradeoffs? 

If they didn't spend time and lives on reconstructing the systems, what else could they be doing? 

Working up a proposal for a Global Reactor Integrated Entombment Facility, which would have already done the engineering, cost and supply chain analysis for all reactors worldwide, identified critical bottlenecks in entombment supply chains/logistics, and assessed the adequacy of emergency management procedures including evacuations and refugee support.

If we had such an asset we would know a lot more and probably be saving lives, avoiding stress and panic, and who knows maybe even saving money.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:09 | 1094924 Invisible Hand
Invisible Hand's picture

Do any of the people (in the media or at Zerohedge) know anything about the subject (reactors, radiation safety, risks of radiation exposure) about which they so eagerly and vociferously pontificate?

I have seen no evidence that they do (and I am a qualified expert in these fields and more currently in the medical uses of radiation).

These articles are pure fear mongering and conspiracy theories with little, or any, basis in scientific fact.

Personally, I am glad I am near the end of my life because living in a world where the idiots and charlatans (nuclear hysteria, global warming hysteria, GM food hysteria, dietary hysteria, etc., etc.) are the main stream media, science and political voices is just too distressing.

Future generations are going to starve in the dark and curse their ancestors for throwing away the technology that has made us the healthiest, longest lived, and most comfortable people who have ever lived. 

What has happened at the Japanese reactors after the 4th largest earthquake ever recorded and the resulting tsunami is a testament to modern engineering can accomplish and also how fragile all the works of man are in the face of nature.  In retrospect, the engineering had faults and can be improved upon in the future (if we have enough sense to continue to build reactors), the response has been less than perfect but after disaster of this magnitude that could not be anticipated or engineered for (can you auto withstand a 100 mph crash into a bridge abutment?-- it might not be possible to engineer it to do so, but if society insisted on it, no one could afford a car) you have to expect that there will be problems.  No technology is without risk.  However, the radiation levels I have seen in Japan are unlikely to have any health effects on members of the general public.  However the scare tactics of the press will probably cause deaths from anxiety all around the world.  Beta exposure to skin to radiation workers is not life or health threatening.  Limits on skin dose (such as beta exposure) are many times higher than whole body dose limits because this exposure, while it may produce skin redness, and even skin burns, has much less danger to current and future health.  These burns will heal as do burns from a fire (how many people were burned in the aftermath in this disaster--should all buildings be made totally fireproof in the face of this scale earthquake/tsunami).  Most anti-contamination clothing is not totally waterproof.  Was this exposure (to trained radiation workers) deemed acceptable due to the gravity of the situation?  If it was unanticipated, they need some good radiation safety people to assist the Japanese.  The US Navy can provide them.  Firemen run into burning buildings all the time.  They have protective equipment but it can not and does not protect them from everything they can encounter.  They get burned and die, it is part of the job.  Exposure to radiation is part of being a radiation worker.  Taking planned, reasonable risks in emergency situations to protect the public is also part of the job.  I have gone into reactor compartments in emergency situations myself.  A little scary but part of the job.

I am taking Zerohedge off my favorites.  This childish article is too much to bear.  Good luck to you all!

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 13:27 | 1095897 Bicycle Repairman
Bicycle Repairman's picture

Sock puppet alert!!.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 10:31 | 1095019 Whoa Dammit
Whoa Dammit's picture

I would like to know why TEPCO had these poor souls running the power lines underground. I hope I am not the only person who thinks this is stupid as hell under the circumstances. It's not like everything has to be neat & tidy, especially since the whole plant seems to be about to go TU any minute.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 12:24 | 1095609 michigan independant
michigan independant's picture

You answered your question since it is step one to rebuilding the site. Time will bear this out. Ruthlessy Pramatic issue are at hand. Also to be seen will be permits on guest workers they punted out with a plane ticket. Think about that moment on so called culture change imbibed in circles these days. As I told my wife define irony as only time will do on this topic to wit to what we see to date. Yes I hope to be wrong, we will see sooner than later. Got to love beta values on things, welcome to the Company.

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 12:44 | 1095706 Spigot
Spigot's picture

Dear Mr. Invisible Hand,

Thank you for taking your opinions somewhere else. In gratitude for your service a one way fare has been sent to you to travel to the Fukushima reactor complex to remediate the situation with the copius hot air flowing from your mouth. I'm sure that will do the trick.

Bon!

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 18:42 | 1097239 Buck Johnson
Buck Johnson's picture

These suits aren't water tight, good god they don't know what they are doing.  If water can get to them how easy is it that radiation is getting to them. 

Thu, 03/24/2011 - 19:09 | 1097358 californiagirl
californiagirl's picture

The 180 mSv was their exposure for just this one incident.  Their actual cummulative exposure was higher. 

Sat, 03/26/2011 - 02:48 | 1102373 US Uncut
US Uncut's picture

"well below the "new normal" baseline safe threshold which as readers will recall was raised for no reason but to mandate the continued risking of innocent lives from 100 to 250 millisieverts a week ago."

They have no choice. If people don't try to stop this....  It's a sad and horrid fact. 

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