Utah Pushes To Accept Gold, Silver As Alternative Currency

Tyler Durden's picture

A month ago we reported that the state of Virginia has established a subcommittee to study alternatives in the case of a terminal "Fed" breakdown, and would propose gold as a sound alternative to the existing fiat currency. Now, the state of Utah has gone a step further and is actually voting, as early as today, on whether to recognize gold and silver coins, issued by the federal government, as legal currency, a move that would send a huge signal to the Marriner Eccles building that Americans have had enough of the Fed's dollar debasement. "The coins would not replace the current paper currency but would be used and accepted voluntarily as an alternative." Reports Foxnews: "The legislation, which has 12 co-sponsors, would let Utahans pay their taxes with gold and also calls for a committee to study alternative currencies for the state. It would also exempt the sale of gold from the state capital gains tax. The bill cleared a state legislative committee on Wednesday, the first of 11 similar bills in statehouses across the country to do so. If the bill clears the House, it would have to pass the Senate before the governor could sign it into law." Paying taxes in gold? Interesting. We certainly hope this was not highlighted due to being the only viable use of funds, as one would question the legitimacy of the entire proposal. Finally: "Attorney and Tea Party activist Larry Hilton, author of the original bill, said he doesn't foresee any roadblocks." We shall see about that, but in the meantime it is worth highlighting that the onslaught against the dollar is coming not only from China which as we reported yesterday is pushing to convert the renminbi to a global reserve currency, but from within, as more and more states realize that the viability of the dollar is now crippled, thanks to the Chairprinter.

From FoxNews:

"There's enough uneasiness going on in the economy to trigger people to feel that, hey, having a little Plan B, kind of a backup system, is not a bad idea," he told FoxNews.com.

The U.S. used some version of the gold standard from 1873 until 1933, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt outlawed the private ownership of gold amid the Great Depression. An international monetary system based on a gold-exchange standard continued until 1971 when President Richard Nixon stopped the U.S. from redeeming dollars for gold altogether.

Critics of the gold standard say it limits countries' control over its monetary policy and leaves them vulnerable to financial shocks, such as the Great Depression. But supporters argue that the current financial system's dependence on the Federal Reserve exposes the value of U.S. money to the threat of inflation.

Not surprisingly, Ron Paul is all over this proposal:

Rep. Ron Paul, a longtime critic of the Federal Reserve who has called on a return to the gold standard, has praised Hilton's efforts.

"Efforts such as yours in states around the country highlight the importance of returning to sound money," Paul wrote in a letter to Hilton. "Even if such efforts fail to achieve legislative success on their first try, their importance lies in bringing to the public's attention the problem of the ever-weakening dollar and the necessity of returning to a sound monetary system."

While the original bill proposed by Hilton also required foreign minted coins to be accepted as legal tender, the revision only limits US produced coins. Even with this setback, Hilton said that he's "willing to take it step-by step."

As we reported yesterday, Bernanke told the Senate yesterday that he does no envision the gold standard as a viable alternative to the disastrous fiat system currently in place, which has resulted in revolutions across the development world. "It did deliver price stability over long periods of time, but over shorter periods of time it caused wide swings in prices related to changes in demand or supply of gold. So I don't think it's a panacea." Supposedly Bernanke has not seen the VIX in 2008.

The bill, once passed will be a critical stepping stone to not only undermining the dollar but to further stablishing gold as a true reserve currency alternative:

Jeff Bell, a policy director for the Washington-based American Principles in Action (APPIA), which helped shape the Utah bill, told FoxNews.com that passage of the bill would send a message to Washington and other states.

"People sense that in the era of quantitative easing and zero interest rates, something has gone haywire with our monetary policy. But people are afraid to say it," said Bell, who was an adviser to Ronald Reagan's 1976 and 1980 presidential campaigns. "If one state recognizes gold as a valid currency, I think it would embolden people not just in other states but in Washington."

Bell credited Tea Party activists for advancing the legislation this far. Rep. Brad Galvez, who introduced the legislation, is a freshman legislator backed by the Tea Party.

"Saying we now recognize gold as money is a big step forward," he said.

And once Utah proves a successful test bed of this near-revolutionary refutation of the Chairman's ideology, everyone else will follow:

Twelve other states have offered similar proposals: Georgia, Montana, Missouri, Colorado, Indiana, Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington, Vermont and Oklahoma.

It goes without saying that we will track these developments closely, and carefully observe who(and why) voices any opposition to comparable proposals elsewhere.