Very Weak 5 Year Auction Raises Speculation That Neither US Dollar Nor Treasurys Are Flight To Safety Any Longer

Tyler Durden's picture

The US Treasury completed the latest ponzi shuffling of Treasuries to Primary Dealers (who will shortly send it all back to the Fed, pocketing a few hundred million in bid/ask spreads and commissions in the process), selling $35 billion in 5 Year bonds at a 2.19% high yield, the highest since April 2010. The internals, as has lately been the case, were not pretty. The bid to cover was 2.69 compared to 2.97 previously and 2.76 LTM average. Directs took down just 7.7%, as it now becomes obvious that the "UK" is no longer gobbling up bonds, and we expect the UK-bond build up as per TIC will stop in a month or two tops. Indirects also took down less than average, as foreign banks purchased just 34.2% of the auction, compared to 41.5% on average. Which of course means that PDs had to step into save the day: at 58.2%, PDs took down the highest amount since July 2009. Lastly, the auction prices about 2 bps wide of the when issued. That we could have such a weak auction in a day when risk is surging, is a stunner. Have gold and silver (and the CHF) finally become the widely accepted new risk avoidance products, instead of the USD and the UST? If so, that is a far bigger revolution than anything happening in the Maghreb now.