Getting A Job At McDonald's Harder Than Getting Accepted To The Ivy League

In 2011, McDonald's announced it would hire 50,000 new employees on April 19 for its National Hiring Day. They eventually hired 62,000 people. Over 1 million people applied. With 62,000 hired out of more than 1 million, that leaves the McDonald's acceptance rate at 6.20%. Let's see how that compares with the Ivy League acceptance rate in 2011...

Senate Democrats Defeat The President: Why Obama Is Rushing To Fast-Track The TPP

Moments ago, in an embarrassing setback for the president, Senate Democrats in a 52-45 vote - short of the required 60 supporters - blocked a bill that would give President Barack Obama fast-track authority to expedite trade agreements through Congress, a major defeat for the president and his allies who "say the measure is necessary to complete a 12-nation Pacific trade deal that is a centerpiece of the administration’s economic agenda." But don't count it out yet: the WSJ cites Mitch McConnell who told reporters shortly before the vote, which he expected to lose, that “This issue’s not over" adding that "I’m hopeful we’ll put this in the win column for the country sometime soon.”

Canaries In The Coal Mine, Part 1: Tech High-Flyers Fall To Earth

Bull markets don’t end all at once. Generally a few egregiously-overvalued sectors blow up first and are dismissed by most observers as aberrations. Instead, they turn out to be a sign of things to come. In the previous decade’s bubble it was subprime housing that led the way, while being initially characterized by experts as too small to matter. Click here for Ben Bernanke’s ongoing attempts to convince the world to relax and ignore housing’s problems. This time around we of course won’t know until after the fact which sector is the canary in the coal mine. But these epic fails in the bubbly social media/online marketplace region of tech certainly look like viable candidates.

If You're Not Outraged By NSA Surveillance, Here's Why You Should Be

Thursday, in a long-awaited opinion, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York' three-judge panel ruled that the NSA program that secretly intercepts the telephone metadata of every American was illegal. It’s now up to Congress to vote on whether or not to modify the law and continue the program, or let it die once and for all. Lawmakers must vote on this matter by June 1, when they need to reauthorize the Patriot Act. A key factor in that decision is the American public’s attitude toward surveillance. Given the vast amount of revelations about NSA abuses, it is somewhat surprising that just slightly more than a majority of Americans seem concerned about government surveillance. Which leads to the question of why?

 

Armed Robbery In Midtown Manhattan Jewelry Store, Shots Fired

New York's thieves are getting bolder. After years without any violent crime in that mecca of hedge funds, midtown east, moments ago the NYC Scanner reported that there was an armed robbery in a jewelry store at 510 Madison where shots were fired (seemingly unaware that NYC is a gun free zone) and while 1 suspect was in custody two are still outstanding.

Wall Street To Enter Hollow Guilty Plea On FX Rigging, Return To Business As Usual

The Justice Department looks set to extract "unprecedented" guilty pleas from some of Wall Street's largest banks in connection with their role in rigging FX markets. Nevertheless, fears of triggering an "Arthur Andersen effect" will ensure that once again, TBTF institutions will suffer no material consequences.

Central Banks Drop An Anvil On Bond Shorts In Today's 3 Year Auction

Earlier today, there was once again a massive scarcity of 3 Year underlying paper, when as the SMRA charts below show, the bond was trading the most negative in repo it has been since September: at a -1.68% rate, everyone was rushing to short ahead of today's 3 Year auction. And with the latest tumble in rates, absolutely, everyone was convinced shorting today's 3 Year auction would be easy money. And then the central banks showed up, in the form of a whopping 52.7% in Indirect Bid takedown in the just concluded auction of $24 billion in 3 Years, which also was the highest indirect bid since December 2009.

Rental Armageddon Continues

At the core, a healthy housing market is one where owner-occupied buyers dominate the bulk of home sales. That is simply not the case. This is how you have well paid tech workers in San Francisco cramming into a 2-bedroom apartment like a clown car simply to get by. One thing that is certain from the overall trend is that larger investors are pulling back from the market dramatically.

Iran Responds To US Naval Escalation, Sends Warship Escort For Yemen Aid Vessel

The Iranian Navy is escorting Yemen-bound ships which Tehran says are carrying humanitarian aid for those caught in the crossfire between the Houthis and the Saudis. Given 'coalition' suspicions surrounding the possibility that Iran is arming militiamen, expect the US to be very interested in inspecting the aid vessels, setting the stage for a possible "accident" off the war-torn country's coast.

Greece Effectively Defaults To IMF Using SDR Reserves To "Repay" Fund; 1 Month Countdown Begins

Greece tapped emergency reserves in its holding account at the IMF in order to make a 750 million euro payment to the Fund on Monday meaning that, as predicted, the IMF is now paying itself. Athens has one month to replenish the account. Meanwhile, the Fund has indicated it wants no part of another Greek bailout. And just to confirm how terminal the situation for Greece is, MarketNews just reported that Greece now has a paltry €90 million in cash reserves left. The end of the world's most drawn out tragicomedy is finally nigh.

Is This Why Greek ATMs Are Empty?

Police have launched a manhunt for a 45-year-old man from Crete who is suspected of robbing 540,000 euros from the security firm at which he worked.