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The Hidden Dark Agenda of Public Education

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“An alien collectivist (socialist) philosophy, much of which came from Europe, crashed onto the shores of our nation, bringing with it radical changes in economics, politics, and education, funded - surprisingly enough - by several wealthy American families and their tax-exempt foundations. The goal of these wealthy families and their foundations - a seamless non-competitive global system for commerce and trade - when stripped of flowery expressions of concern for minorities, the less fortunate, etc., represented the initial stage of what this author now refers to as the deliberate dumbing down of America. Seventy years later, the carefully laid plans to change America from a sovereign, constitutional republic with a free enterprise economic base to just one of many nations in an international socialist (collectivist) system (New World Order) are apparent. Only a dumbed down population, with no memory of America’s roots as a prideful nation, could be expected to willingly succumb to the global workforce training planned by the Carnegie Corporation and the John D. Rockefellers, I and II.”

- US Department of Education Senior Policy Advisor Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt

 

 

Yesterday I released an article, “Lack of Critical Thinking is Key to the Corrupt Status Quo Maintaining Their Power”, on my blog and at ZeroHedge and it generated a lot of comments including those that stated they don’t believe in conspiracies or the existence of a “big bad wolf” that deliberately is “out to get us”. However, for those of us familiar with the works of John Taylor Gatto, we know that there are literally mountains of evidence that indict former Presidents and corporate businessmen with deliberately steering the global education system towards the singular mission of producing obedient factory workers to serve the corporate industrialists during the Industrial Revolution. Furthermore, there are mountains of evidence, direct from the horse’s mouth, that their continued mission for the academic system today is to produce obedient servants to the State and to kill any individualism and critical thinking that may lead to an awakened state among the masses that would challenge the moral authority, or rather lack thereof, of those in power.

 

John Taylor Gatto, one of the most well-known and outspoken critics of the public education system, quit his 30-year teaching career in 1991, because confined within the system, Gatto believe he was hurting children more than helping them. He stated the following as his reason for leaving institutional academia:

 

“I feel ashamed that so many of us cannot imagine a better way to do things than locking children up all day in cells instead of letting them grow up knowing their families, mingling with the world, assuming real obligations, striving to be independent and self-reliant and free...I don’t mean to be inflammatory, but it’s as if government schooling made people dumber, not brighter; made families weaker, not stronger...the training field for these grotesque human qualities is the classroom. Schools train individuals to respond as a mass. Boys and girls are drilled in being bored, frightened, envious, emotionally needy, and generally incomplete. A successful mass production economy requires such a clientele. A small business, small farm economy like that of the Amish requires individual competence, thoughtfulness, compassion, and universal participation; our own requires a managed mass of leveled, spiritless, anxious, family-less, friendless, godless, and obedient people who believe the difference between Cheers and Seinfeld is a subject worth arguing about. An executive director of the National Education Association announced that his organization expected ‘to accomplish by education what dictators in Europe are seeking to do by compulsion and force.’ You can’t get much clearer than that. WWII drove the project underground, but hardly retarded its momentum. Following cessation of global hostilities, school became a major domestic battleground for the scientific rationalization of social affairs through compulsory indoctrination.”


I precisely stated in my article yesterday, “Refuse to accept something as fact just because an authority figure, whether a professor, the Vatican, or politician, told you to believe it, and automatically many amongst the sheep will accuse one of pandering to conspiracy theories, even when one can present many facts that support one’s opposition view much more strongly than the widely accepted view” in the hopes that people would read this line and digest historical facts before dismissing the main points of my article. Yet, from reading the comments posted below my article yesterday, it seems as though some may have dismissed my argument before even examining the facts.

 

Mr. O.A. Nelson, retired educator, recounted a December 1928 meeting in which he spoke to the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His recollection of the meeting below addresses some of the comments posted on my article from yesterday regarding the importance of sciences.

 

"We were 13 at the meeting. Two things caused Dr. Ziegler, who was Chairman of the Educational Committee of the Council on Foreign Relations, to ask me to attend...my talk on the teaching of functional physics in high school, and the fact that I was a member of Progressive Educators of America, which was nothing but a Communist front. I thought the word ‘progressive’ meant progress for better schools. Eleven of those attending the meeting were leaders in education. Drs. John Dewey and Edward Thorndike, from Columbia University, were there, and the others were of equal rank. I checked later and found that all were paid members of the Community Party of Russia. I was classified as a member of the Party, but I did not know it at the time. The sole work of the group was to destroy our schools! we spent one hour and forty-five minutes discussing the so-called ‘Modern Math.’ At one point I objected because there was too much memory work, and math is reasoning; not memory. Dr. Ziegler turned to me and said, ‘Nelson, wake up! That is what we want… a math that the pupils cannot apply to life situations when they get out of school!’ That math was not introduced until much later, as those present thought it was too radical a change. A milder course by Dr. Brechner was substituted but it was also worthless, as far as understanding math was concerned. The radical change was introduced in 1952. It was the one we are using now. So, if pupils come out of high school now, not knowing any math, don’t blame them. The results are supposed to be worthless."


While I agree that sciences are critical for learning and also critical for the development of reasoning skills, Dr. Ziegler’s comments reveal that men like him, men that helped shape our academic system, clearly did not want sciences to be taught in a manner that would improve critical thinking and reasoning skills, but instead, in a manner that was completely inapplicable to real life situations.

 

It is not a coincidence that after I graduated from university, I often would comment to my friends, “You know what, there is not one thing I learned in school that I apply in life today.” In fact, the inapplicability of schooling in life reaches far back from even my university days. When I was 14, I had already completed two years of advanced calculus, and believed in a typical teenager bout of self-delusion, that I was some sort of mathematical genius. But in reality, outside of the praise of my teachers, what was the point of my mathematical "progress" back then? Yes, it enabled me to score a perfect score on the math portion of the SATs and then gain entrance into an Ivy League university. However, in retrospect and in complete absurdity, I cannot think of one instance since my educational career ended that I have ever applied, in real life, anything that I learned during my years of mathematical schooling. It is as if the purpose of my institutional mathematical training was solely to enable me to gain a higher score on a standardized test, a ridiculous purpose if there ever was one. And today? Because all I did was memorize advanced mathematical formulas back then, I have long since forgotten them all, and nothing is applicable to my life today just as Dr. Ziegler of the CFR had desired.

 

In great irony, it was the very inapplicability of education that allowed me to excel through the system. The advantage I held over all my peers was that I had a photographic memory. I recall even as early as the 6th grade when I could read a passage about the Civil War a single time and remember exactly how many soldiers died from each side in each battle and on what specific date in history. Because the academic system stressed rote memory and regurgitation without any true learning, my photographic memory served me exceedingly well and my teachers labeled me as “gifted” and heaped extra attention upon me, even though I never really began to learn how to critically think until I read books on my own outside of the academic system and after I had already graduated from university.

 

But what if sciences were taught in a manner that developed critical thinking and reasoning skills? How much easier today would it be today to actually convince people of the fact that the global monetary and Central Banking system is a criminal, immoral system deliberately designed by corporate thieves to harm people instead of help people? How much easier would it be to convince people of State run false flag propaganda such as the bogus enemy engagement of the USS Maddox in the Gulf of Tonkin at the time it happened instead of 40 years later? How much easier would it be to convince people that the two-party system in America is just an illusion to con people into believing they have a choice when no real choice is ever offered to people in elections? Of course, the answer is that it would be infinitely easier.

 

The lack of developed critical thinking skills in the institutional academic system is also the reason why people continue to falsely believe the propaganda of banker shills that a gold standard helped cause the Great Depression and why it is so difficult to convince Westerners of the value of gold and silver but infinitely easier to convince Asians of the value of gold and silver. The stark dichotomy is due simply to the fact that people believe what the State tells them to believe. Logic, reasoning, and critical thinking are all meals on the menu of threats to the power of the status quo. And this is why the goal of academic education by the elites is to strip away reasoning skills from subjects such as math that inherently rely on reasoning. This is also the reason why institutional academia will never change and that those that wish for it to change find that they cannot work within the system but have to leave it. My friend, Alyssa Gonzales, decided that operating outside of the system and serving as a founding teacher of her own school, Los Feliz Charter School for the Arts, was the best solution to be able to encourage, instead of suppress, the development of critical thinking and reasoning skills of young children. If you live in Los Angeles, please visit her school and support Ms. Gonzales’s efforts, described at their website as the following:

 

"In contrast to curriculum found in a traditional public school setting which stresses teaching and learning in the areas that can be most easily assessed by standardized testing measures, arts-integrated curriculum develops the whole child: kinesthetic, musical, spatial, interpersonal, intrapersonal and natural intelligences. At LFCSA, we challenge children to construct their own meaning from complex ideas and concepts. Acknowledging that students learn and demonstrate what they know in a variety of ways, our instruction allows children to see, hear, and express according to their individual learning styles."


In support of spreading awareness of the true intent of corporate businessmen that have “donated” billions of dollars to shape the curricula of the most “prestigious” schools in the world today, here is a video titled “The Dark Secrets of Public Education”. Certainly, this video deserves a thousand times more views than the current 9,900 views it has thus far received. If you would like for our communities to be more thoughtful, more open-minded, and more co-operative in the future instead of obedient to the powers that be, please send this article and video to everyone you know so we can foster a more honest and open debate about the State’s goals of institutional academia. Thank you.

 

 

Read Part I of this series here, Lack of Critical Thinking is Key to the Corrupt Status Quo Maintaining Their Power

Read Part III of this series here, Business School Curricula Today Lacks Real Critical Knowledge to Survive the Global Economic Crisis.

 

About the author: JS Kim is the Founder and Chief Investment Strategist for SmartKnowledgeU, a fiercely independent investment research and consulting firm with a mission of helping to stomp out Wall Street fraud and to reinstitute sound monetary principles and sound money worldwide. We sincerely appreciate all of you that continue to “like” our Facebook fan page and "follow us" on Twitter. Through these mediums, we will keep all of you aware of some major campaigns we will be launching in early 2012 to raise global awareness of monetary truth and our proposed solutions to institute sound money that CAN serve as a viable and implementable solution to the financial ills heaped upon us by the global banking cartel.

 

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Mon, 01/23/2012 - 14:15 | 2089515 tresedu
tresedu's picture

Iserbyt's and Gatto's book(s) have really opened my eyes. I always knew, both as a student and teacher, that something was wrong with our schools and how and what we learned; these authors gave reason to my suspicions. I do enjoy when I read and encounter others who share these views- keep it up!  -Tresedu, check out my related blog http://3rseduc.blogspot.com

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Mon, 01/16/2012 - 20:21 | 2069728 Hobbleknee
Hobbleknee's picture

btw, the book was a huge awakening for me, and it was the first step in a process that transformed me from a neo-con into the bad-ass, anti-NWO Libertarian that I am today.

When Gatto compares gasoline and guns, and how they're both deadly, but all you need to buy gas is cash and a container...  that was it- that was my red pill.

Mon, 01/16/2012 - 00:43 | 2067928 Helvetico
Helvetico's picture

The only agenda here is the willfull stupidity on the part of the American people. For some good background, read "Anti-Intellectualism in American Life" by Richard B Hofstadter. http://www.amazon.com/Anti-Intellectualism-American-Life-Richard-Hofstad...

Once you've realized that A) Americans have always viewed teachers and academics as effete losers and B) Women's ability to move into non-traditional careers (law, business, medicine) dried up the supply of smart, educated people who were running public school so well until the late 60's and early 70's, it becomes apparent that the intense love Americans have of all things shiny, stupid and transient is what has gotten them into their current mess.

Ask your average parent if they want their kid to become a teacher, and you'll get looks ranging from subtle concern to outright horror. "We didn't pay for 16 years of private school and college" so Junior here could do social work! "I mean," they say, "it's a very noble profession that we all highly respect and have good things to say about," but no son of mine is going to be one of those losers!

Americans are dumb because hey, they feel comfortable around other dumb people, and all you got to know to thrive is your job, period. Outside of work hours it's all celebrity gossip, professional sports, shopping, eating out to the point of bursting, watching TV and movies and texting your buddies about all the mindless consumerism you've just engaged in. Bring up any original ideas and you're a real downer, man. Do this in school and you'll be seen as a possible subversive intent on not following curricular standards.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 21:25 | 2063815 honestann
honestann's picture

Good thing I didn't learn anything from school.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 21:16 | 2063800 ozziindaus
ozziindaus's picture

No doubt. The elitists simply do not want competition for them, their kids or their kind. I recall once seeing an interview with Bill Gates where he was asked what his biggest fear was. His answer, the kid tinkering in his garage with the next big idea. Philanthropist, my balls. 

Sat, 01/14/2012 - 14:38 | 2064733 the grateful un...
the grateful unemployed's picture

Gates is a businessman first, everything he has done as a businessman has worked against the development of new and better technology.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 18:25 | 2063447 Georgesblog
Georgesblog's picture

Knowing Charlotte as I do, from working in talk radio, there were no surprises, here. At least I feel better that I never fit in the classroom environment. At least I know why I never wanted to be there. Now I understand why it was important that I never got into the position of having too much to lose. I would have been as pinned down and clueless as most of the people around me.

http://georgesblogforum.wordpress.com/2011/11/02/the-daily-climb-2/

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:56 | 2062829 stiler
stiler's picture

my wife and I educated our two daughters @ home. They can think critically better than anyone I know, both have their own online businesses and help run a permaculture farm. My son didn't read until much later than the first daughter at 2 yrs. He died last year from leukemia at 15 after an osteosarcoma below the knee, but he died at home with us. The education system I liken to the prison system and the deathcare system is no better. 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:26 | 2062704 Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

If home schooling become de riguer, we would have people even less qualified teaching our children in about 98% of homes....

This would be the equivalent of Mao's Great Leap Forward, US style... 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 16:04 | 2062821 Myshkin
Myshkin's picture

At levels of higher education this matters.  At elementary levels, "qualified" is not what makes a great teacher.  Individual attention, customized learning and extended 1-on-1 interaction BY FAR trumps the level of education the teacher attained.  When math and science reaches modestly difficult levels, yes, the teachers must know enough to at least guide students to sources of good information, but at the elementary level, interaction and interest are what drive learning, not teacher knowledge.  Any HS graduate (assuming they can actually read and write, and are motivated) knows enough to teach 5th grade and lower, imho.  

As an aside, the college graduation rate is high enough in this country that a great many parents are qualified to teach all the way through HS.  Plus, there are enough group learning opportunites (co-ops), online classes (Stanford has a great online program for "Gifted" Students), and alternate education options like early entry to college courses.  

The expanding use of home schooling has made it so co-ops can provide learning opportunities for older kids whose parents may not be qualified to teach (my wife, for example, has a Physics degree and served as a HS math and science teacher, then administered an afterschool program... now she teaches some of the older kids at a local homeschool co-op).  There is a communal element that is necessary for home schooing to work optimally.  After all, the purpose of home schooling in not to SHELTER kids from the world, it's to EXPOSE them to a much broader view of the world than they would receive in a classroom full of only peers their own age.  It is to remove them from the incredibly boring brain-washing they receive in public schools.  My 6 year old spent today studying the structure of U.S. Government - it's what he ASKED to study today.  Kids want to learn - they just need to be freed to do it in a manner that isn't like some kind of industrial assembly line.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 16:47 | 2063026 Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

You read far too much in my use of qualified.... I refer to competent, and no, possesion of a university degree, does not make you "competent" to teach...

To wit, I know lots of University graduates that I would not let my kids near on a one-on-one basis to teach them anything...

I stand by my statement that if you think that the problems of public education at  the societal level is addressed by home schooling, you are utterly delusional.....

Do not misunderstand what I said, I do not doubt that in a small minority of cases that home schooling would be a superior means. Afterall, that is how the elite were taught in the days of private tutors...

Any cursory examination of the education that most of the privileged few recieved in the 19th century shows will show that...just look at Churchill, Roosevelt, and men of their ilk...

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 18:22 | 2063425 Myshkin
Myshkin's picture

I agree that for the whole of society, home-schooling is not a reasonable solution.  It's not that I don't think parents could do a good job, it's that in my very subjective estimation, most parents wouldn't care (anywhere near) enough to put in the necessary work to do it effectively.  The easy solution to leave the education of your children in the hands of someone else.  So that's what we as a society do.  And, as you accurately point out, will continue to do.

Sun, 01/15/2012 - 22:05 | 2067616 Sassy4205
Sassy4205's picture

The answer is to restructure the education system...how the children are taught and what they are taught.  There is a school that my friends send their children to that is in a hands-on environment that teaches critical thinking skills.  I wish the school were closer to us because I'd send my step-daughter there.  It's not that a child needs to be homeschooled, though I've known many people who have had great success with this, it's the curriculum and methods of education that are at fault.  Homeschooling is not always the answer either...I've found many of those children are socially immature for their ages and have difficulties interacting with other children their age...not that the other children are better or smarter or more wicked.  But there is street intelligent involved here that they will need when they enter the real world of the work environment...how to deal with adults of all backgrounds that homeschooled children just don't get because of lack of exposure to other kids and they then become victims of the system...and that is very sad because most of these kids are really good kids.  There has to be a happy middle ground and I'm sure there is but, as the video shows, the elite don't want our children to be taught that way.  They want them to be slaves.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:22 | 2062686 Offtheradar
Offtheradar's picture

Two words  "Critical Thinkers"   Opposite of my dipshit brother....

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:11 | 2062626 Offtheradar
Offtheradar's picture

Wipe the fog off the glass and everything is clear.   Good job!

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:54 | 2062554 malalingua
malalingua's picture

Great post J.S. Kim! For further reading consideraton: The Theory of Education In the United States by Albert Jay Nock

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:58 | 2062295 Randall Cabot
Randall Cabot's picture

How do you write an extensive article about the fucked up education system without mentioning The Frankfurt School, The Freudians and the so-called New York Intellectuals? I see that the frontman Dewey was mentioned but not his puppet masters. This article belongs on David Horowitz's site not Zero Hedge.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:09 | 2062610 CH1
CH1's picture

Dude, accept the good stuff written here, then add to it if you can.

To hate it because it left out your favorite part is counter-productive. This is not about being right, it is about creating benefit and progress.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:42 | 2062763 Randall Cabot
Randall Cabot's picture

Dude, that is one of the dumbest posts I've ever seen here on ZH.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:54 | 2062283 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

( See folks those Black parents are JUST LIKE YOU! They fucking REFUSE to accept RESPONSIBILITY for their CHILDRENS education! They chose to blame EVERYONE ELSE! Blame the schools, blame the banks, blame consumerism, blame socialism, BLAME EVERYBODY AND EVERYTHING BUT NEVER FUCKING ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR YOUR OWN GODDAMN LIVES!)

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Actually, they are right.

Quite a number of people in this US driven world leaves the education business to a stranger.

Quite a number of parents never bother about the education of their kids, they pay an institution for that.

So those black US citizens just mimick their neighbours, thinking that what works for the neighbours should work for them.

It doesnt.

Has this study the number of those negroes who got a job secured before even entering the school because of their parents position, amount of private property etc?

The fact is that in this US driven world, for the same level of proficiency, some have the prospect of a job secured while others do not have.

They are many, many people who are average. It is really easy to discriminate against people who are average because of their number. One average person fits for another.

That is the reality of it.

What is the point in the end? US citizenism.

The taste for inequality shown by US citizens is always as entertaining.

They are always special cases.

So here, we have US citizens telling that diplomae are just worthless pieces of paper but also indicts a segment of population for not beavering away to secure those pieces of paper, which explains thefailure at large.

Always the same pattern.

Whenthey send USD abroad, US citizens send real wealth. They make outsiders richer.

When they have USD intheir pockets, US citizens are made poorer by the PTB because it is nothing but paper.

No matter the question, no matter the sector, it is always tackled the same way, through US citizenism.

Reaching the kind of conclusions you've got when you use US citizenism.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:48 | 2062242 Stuck on Zero
Stuck on Zero's picture

Big government can't do anything well.  That includes building an educational system meant to turn out drones and zombies.It is starting to backlash.  Ron Paul comes to mind.  Ron Paul's strongest support is among the young people raised in the zombie school system.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:26 | 2062388 Myshkin
Myshkin's picture

The first step to freeing children from the System's brain-washing is to remove them from the System by letting them integrate with home as their starting point, rather than school.  

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:28 | 2062326 Myshkin
Myshkin's picture

We home school.  I can't believe more people don't.  The boy is 6, has read The Chronicles of Narnia, almost the entire Hardy Boys catalogue, is reading an Albert Einstein biography... he is hungry to learn.  If he was in school, he'd be bored out of his mind and making trouble at every turn.  At home, he has the opportunity to research whatever interests him and we can take him on field trips to museums, galleries, battlefields... wherever we or he would like.  I'm surprised that home schooling is often portrayed as just a religious choice.  At this point, the benefits extend WELL beyond value and belief system (although it's certainly beneficial to be able to impart the VS/BS of the parents, rather than that of peers/teachers).  At home he is free to focus on that which interests him most, and we can personalize the work to his style of learning.  Plus, he's not going to get bullied, molested or shot.

Here's hoping more of America wakes up to the broad benefits of home schooling.  It was how every child learned for most of human history.  No one is more incentivized to teach a child than a parent.  I think Sir Ken Robinson is excellent on the subject of modern education.  (http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity.html)

If looking for one more reason to vote for Ron Paul, he's offered legislation every year to enact vouchers that would include the costs associated with home schooling.  As is, I pay property taxes to "educate" the children of others, while paying for the curriculum books, online courses, etc. that we use out of my own pocket.  But it's certainly worth every cent to see him be able to learn without shackles, doing 4th grade work in 1st grade.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:15 | 2062640 CH1
CH1's picture

On behalf of myself and all decent terrans, please accept my sincere thanks for raising people fit to share a planet.

Really.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:55 | 2062288 AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Big government cant do anything well?

Ask US citizens of A. The story of their country is a success story, a love song to the State apparatus.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:40 | 2062210 dagnytaggert
dagnytaggert's picture

Whether or not a dumb-down conspiracy exists or ever existed is immaterial. The motives for any such dumbing-down are immaterial. The percentage of good teachers in public schools is immaterial. The only pertinent facts are that public school is a relatively new experiment and that other, better ways are available and legal. Homeschooling, tutors, apprenticeships and online courses (e.g., Stanford's Education Program for Gifted Youth) are excellent substitutes for public schooling. We are  homeschooling our child because we concluded that we could offer him a broad education with plenty of travel, mentors, science, math, critical thinking and study of original documents. 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:42 | 2062209 FeralSerf
FeralSerf's picture

This article make it easier to understand how the Bush/Cheney adminstration and the Zionist co-conspirators managed to pull off 9-11 so convincingly, even though it should be obvious to anyone with a minimal knowledge of natural laws that the official explanations were lies intended to cover up their crimes.  Sadly, most people still believe their lies, thanks to their public schools' dumbing-down "education", or more accurately brain-washing indoctrination.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:17 | 2062652 CH1
CH1's picture

Gee, let's get totally off-subject and waste our energy arguing Zionism...

or maybe not.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:41 | 2062201 falak pema
falak pema's picture

I don't see how a public educational system in a country that PRIDES itself in having a parallel private educational system from high school to its famous IVY league universities, endowed by Alma mater donations of the rich and wealthy, can even dare to proclaim in public  : that the PUBLIC system is JUNKING our national education MIND SET and values. That public system is for the common man, just like the PRIVATE system, HUGELY endowed, is for the sons of the wealthy. And THEIR critical skills can be honed in these havens of learning of uber -alles class as before.

No, the problem is elsewhere : it is that PRECISELY THE UBER ALLES SCHOOLS HAVE NOW GOT SUCKED INTO HUBRIS MIND SET. They can't tell shit from shine hole, and believe that the sun never sets on upper class America. 

So the mentality has changed in the TOP 10% of America,, the scions of the "Happy FEW", who sit in WS and Congress, precisely where all the corruption is. DOn't look further to find the roots of US society's evil. Its ALWAYS TOP DOWN, the rot, never bottom up. So don't blame the mind set change of those who APE the habits of the consumerist and dumb ugly top echelons, darlings of the media hype, prevalent Zeitgeist of US hubris and "live now and never play later" mind set. The  "have you seen my new Ferrari'" crowd of the new paladins of WS trading pools. What  you sow at the Top of the heap, your reap, and the 99% weep.

Shame on 1% America, to now cry "WE'VE BEEN ROBBED BY ALL THE MONEY SPENT ON THOSE 99% SHILLS."

LIES, DAMN LIES AND ELITIST MANIPULATION. 

 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:53 | 2062278 Gadocat99
Gadocat99's picture

"They can't tell shit from shine hole, ..."

 

You hear your father or grandfather say something like that?  The expression you are looking for is, "They can't tell shit from Shinola."  Shinola is a old brand of shoe polish.  

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:24 | 2062442 falak pema
falak pema's picture

Thank you, but I exercise my poetic license to say it my way; just saying. Just like Elvis sang it in "My way". And, 'shine hole' is more in line with shit than boot polish. It makes more sense. Just look at your baby's botty and you'll know the difference between shit and shine hole. 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:31 | 2062465 Gadocat99
Gadocat99's picture

Just didn't want you to embarrass yourself in front of centenarians.  They can be brutal.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 14:45 | 2062509 falak pema
falak pema's picture

If they've made it to a hundred I'll eat humble pie gladly, hats off to a centenarian. Lol, old age does have its natural privileges.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:27 | 2062158 cocoablini
cocoablini's picture

Public education is to create sufficiency for future employablity for companies. Not enlightenment

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 16:21 | 2062923 Myshkin
Myshkin's picture

+1

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:26 | 2062141 Milton Freewater
Milton Freewater's picture

Here is another interesting interview with Norman Dodd. He was head of a congressional investigation into the dealings of nonprofit foundations done in the 50's. He investigated the Rockefeller Foundation,  The Ford Foundation and the Carnage Foundation.  Very interesting.  Please watch.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8605813744843314322

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:54 | 2061988 cdskiller
cdskiller's picture

This is your brain on drugs. A low point for the website, against which all other questionable posts can be measured. Blaming a communist agenda in public schools for the difficulty convincing people that global finance is a criminal system designed by corporate thieves. That's the definition of crazy talk, my friends.

Gatto is looney tunes. If he were to be taken seriously, he wouldn't quote an unnamed executive director of the NEA. Critical thinking by Mr. Kim, aka, smartknowledgeu, has not been applied to his own sources. If Mr. Kim were to be taken seriously, he would also include facts in his bogus arguments and wild assertions before admonishing critics of his ridiculous theories to examine his non-existent facts. 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:07 | 2062062 Milton Freewater
Milton Freewater's picture

John Taylor Gatto was named New York City Teacher of the Year in 1989, 1990, and 1991, and New York State Teacher of the Year in 1991.   In 1991, he wrote a letter announcing his retirement, titled I Quit, I Think, to the op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal, saying that he no longer wished to "hurt kids to make a living." Not what I'd call a loony tune.


Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:20 | 2062668 CH1
CH1's picture

This guy doesn't care, Milt. He's here to waste your time and energy.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:45 | 2061932 the grateful un...
the grateful unemployed's picture

part of the problem is technology.do you need to practice multiplication and division when you have a calculator, grammar when you have spellcheck. i have an algebra software program i use to solve problems. and while its true people need critical thinking skills (knowing which equation to use and when to apply it is part of the art of learning, which is why mathematics students must practice) i agree that the education system needs to become more integrated, and to that end i try to combine math and art in my work, and the while the term "recreational mathematics" may be the biggest oxymoron ever, these are worth pursuing, but we can't get there by following standardized tests.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 13:03 | 2062040 YHC-FTSE
YHC-FTSE's picture

I was going to disagree with the initial sentence, "part of the problem is technology", because searching for information has become so much easier and comprehensive for scholars these days, but I'm just as old fashioned as you are about having core skills (Basic maths and language) without the need for technology, so I agree with you as well as the premise that practice makes perfect (or at least an adequate facsimile). 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:36 | 2061868 Milton Freewater
Milton Freewater's picture

Here is a link to a blog call "Tragedy and Hope" after the Carroll Quigley book. They have just completed a 5 part interview with John Taylor Gatto.     There whole blog is very interesting.  I encourage everyone to check it out.   John Taylor Gatto experienced a stroke this fall so this may be the last interview with him.   http://tragedyandhope.com/video/the-ultimate-history-lesson-a-weekend-wi...

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 15:21 | 2062676 CH1
CH1's picture

John Taylor Gatto experienced a stroke this fall so this may be the last interview with him.  

Damn, very sorry to hear that.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:28 | 2061792 kekekekekekeke
kekekekekekeke's picture

I'm a teacher (specifically a high school English language learner teacher) and I know the system is fubar yet I care about the kiddos but it's just so soul-crushing to torture these kids with the high stakes testing with dumb shit they;ll never use when THEY CAN'T SPEAK ENGLISH

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:24 | 2061774 igordin
igordin's picture

"I checked later and found that all were paid members of the Community Party of Russia."

 

I guess he meant Communist Party. I'm not saying that current school system is good but how do you check for somebody being a paid member of any secretive org? Did they publish the lists of thier paid agents?


Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:00 | 2061649 linrom
linrom's picture

Well I got news for you! You ain't smarter than an average Joe or Jane. Advocacy of public gold-ownership is madness. You can never parlay gold to be worth more than its present day purchasing power.

Thousands of years of gold ownership did not turn anyone into a trillion-aire?

Gold ownership is a FRAUD, It's just another asset class that is pumped. If 90% of the people who own 10% of wealth sell gold to 10% that owe 90% of wealth then one could parlay gold at 10-1; but, its

1-10 the other way.

 

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 11:48 | 2061586 hardcleareye
hardcleareye's picture

"I cannot think of one instance since my educational career ended that I have ever applied, in real life, anything that I learned during my years of mathematical schooling."

 

If that is true, than I doublt you are as intelligent as you think you are.....

I can think of countless times I have used my upper level math in my life.  I am an engineer and later in my life started building timber framed homes (massive wood beams joined with wood pegs), designing and calculating the load stresses on the joints of the frame (hammer truss with a 20' clear span) required 6 th and 7th order differential equations, this I did on paper and with a calculator.  Not trusting my results I then contacted a friend that had developed a program to model the timber frame loading, my hand results were within 10 % of the computer model...

I also am a weaver, (women who could not become engineers became weavers) and every project I weave taps into the math skills that were developed in my formidable years. 

I had wonderful teachers in high school and they made all the difference, I remember my trig teacher bring in a three diminensional 4'by 3' by 3' carving that was a model that discribed the "shape" of an equation.  Thanks to him I can see the "equations" in the patterns that appear in my weaving.

My Diff Eq teacher in college had worked on the rocket research team in Lebanon  in the early 1960's, he gave us real life examples on what these equations did and why they were important, it was a great class.  And I could go on and on discribing the wonderful teachers that I had thru the course of my formal education (and yes I did have some stinkers that wasted my time). 

There are many teachers in the system that still teach to those standards.

While I agree that school system is broken, (I have homeschooled my own children) two of which score over 2230 on the SAT's at the age of 14).  I do not agree with your reasoning for the "disfunction". 

IMO, you have reached the correct conclusion for the wrong reasons.  Reggie's articles on this subject matter is more on point.

Fri, 01/13/2012 - 12:31 | 2061823 the grateful un...
the grateful unemployed's picture

i agree with you. i have seen a number of mexican workers, good people, who don't understand basic geometry. makes me appreciate what little schooling i have.

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