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How Inferior American Education Caused Credit/Real Estate/Sovereign Debt Bubbles & Why It's Preventing True Recovery, Part 1

Reggie Middleton's picture




 

This is part 1 of a lengthy, highly provovative article illustrating in
explicit detail my thoughts on how America's inferior education system
made the Great Recession not only a foregone conclusion of indoctrinated
GroupThink, but prevents a true recovery from recovery due to the
abject fear of price clearing. You may need to put your thinking caps on
and exercise some patience and restraint with this one. I am going to
follow it up with an explcit example of said groupthink by going against
the conventional grain (yet again) and pointing out what many in the
mainstream consider to be the most likely threat to economic prosperity
in 2012 (and no, Iran is not even in the running on this one). I blame
indoctrinated GroupThink for the inability of Wall Street to see the
excessive coniferous expanse due to treebark blindness! Until the next
post, though...

Dubois Speaks Through Me

The problem is
plain before you. Here is a situation transplanted through the criminal
foolishness of those gifted and/or empowered with the productive assets
created and cultivated by our fathers. Whether you like it or not this
country constitutes hundreds of millions of the diverse plethora that is
America. They are already here, and here they will remain. If you do
not enable the mechanisms that allow them to lift themselves up (versus
the socialistic path of trying to lift all up), they will simply pull
you down. Access to (and not the socialistic gifting of) productive
assets (wealth) and knowledge, combined with the teaching of individuals
to build strength of character are the means to which accomplish this.

Physical
and/or mental labor (the staple of the working class) alone will not do
it unless inspired by the right ideals and guided by intelligence and
knowledge. Academic education alone will do little, for look at many of
our brothers and sisters who are highly degreed, yet have a lower
standard of living, lower general level of happiness and less inflation
adjusted net wealth than their parents despite living in a age that
fosters greater access to technology and resources. Successful education
must not simply teach work, or instruct one on how to labor for the
capitalist oligarchy — it must teach Life.

The Truly Talented of
this country who are not extant members of the oligarchy must be made
leaders of thought and missionaries of culture. No others can (or will
honestly) do this work. We must train agents for in the education system
– for the existing oligarchy not only benefits from the teaching of
labor/work as the embodiment of success, but cannot truly exist without
such for it is cheap labor that enables the oligarchy to amass
disproportionate wealth at the expense of the working class - literally
profiting off of the backs of others. To be honest, this is the way of
capitalism. It is understandable and acceptable, but only to the point
to which those laborers willingly accept their position. Once it comes
to the point of attempting to force said laborers into their laborious
positions through duplicity and guile, we not only foster the
misallocation of valuable American resources (human, social and
economic) but we squander what could be sown and fostered to make
America a better and more competitive country, thus putting the great
empire at risk of collapse for the betterment of the very few. America,
like all great establishments, was created, and is going to be saved by
its exceptional heroes – or collapsed due to the lack thereof!

W.E.B. Du Bois, 1903 channeled through Reggie Middleton 2012

The Hole

The Challenge to Our Schools, Educators, and Parents

What
America needs now is a system of education that does not simply teach
academics and create a slave army of rule followers. We need to teach
rule breakers and rule makers. We need to teach charisma. This is how
leaders are made, while a focus on pure academics is how followers are
groomed.
We have to teach our children about life, and the
world around us. We need to teach them how the world actually works, and
test these teachings in the real world regularly in order to “mark our
curriculum to market”. In this fashion, if any of our teachings are
false or too theoretical, their failings in the world marketplace will
allow us to correct course before our students are ruined by a pile of irrelevant academia, or even worse – flat out erroneous information and false knowledge.

Unfortunately, from pre-school to the higher echelons of ivory tower academia, I fear this is where we are right now - our
students are being ruined by a pile of irrelevant academia, or even
worse – flat out erroneous information and false knowledge.

These
precepts may appear somewhat applicable to children of all
socio-economic stratification levels (social classes), though they are
particularly endemic to those in the lower rungs, which prevents the
social mobility that is needed to keep this country fresh, alive,
vibrant and competitive.

I envision an educational system that
articulates a clear philosophy on the proper behavior of American
children: "to teach them delicately a code of honor and action in their
relation with other children and adults of different backgrounds; to
turn their hurts and resentments into emulations, ambition and love of
their own environments and companions; to point out the best amusements
and joys and worth-while things of life; to inspire them to prepare for
definite pursuits of wealth AND social accomplishment, not merely jobs,
occupations, or careers, and to conduct these duties with a broad spirit
of philanthropic sacrifice".

I pray you, tell me, is this what you were taught in school? Is this what your children are being taught in school?

At the very least, have as the base of every academic curriculum:

  1. The current application of popular and nascent technologies
  2. The definition, meaning, and pursuit of wealth
  3. Class consciousness
  4. Philanthropy – what it is, and how it furthers one’s cause
  5. Legacy
    building and the 100 Year Plan – the creation of immortality:
    perpetuating one’s family, family ideology, wealth, and knowledge
    through a minimum of 5 generations.
  6. Modern Politics and Power Structure – what is powerful, who is powerful, and why? How did they get their? How to replace them?
  7. Geo-political structures and power flows – What is the world, who’s in it, and where you stand in the grand scheme of things.

In
DuBois’ missive claiming that the advancement of Blacks depended on the
training of exceptional men who would lead the masses, (academic)
education was prioritized. I’m confident that he erred in this
assessment, although in his time it appeared as if he came to a logical,
if erroneous conclusion. DuBois assumed that (academic) education was
the primary cause of wealth and power in the US. I have found this to be
less than accurate. There is a link between education and
socio-economic success, but that link is less defined and more tenuous
than DuBois realized. If academic education (as was and currently is
consumed by the masses) was the primary goal to pursue, it is painfully
obvious today that it is but a tertiary goal. Wealth, followed by
motivated class consciousness are the two goals that, if achieved will
uplift those captured in the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder of
success.

So, What is the Single Biggest Failing of Today’s Education System Curriculum???

This
article assumes that parents send their children to school to better
themselves through education. If that is truly the case, then please
heed what follows.

The Power Elite documented the social
backgrounds and career trajectories of the people who occupied the
highest posts in what the sociologist, C. Wright Mills saw as
the institutional hubs of power in postwar America: the corporations,
the executive branch of the federal government, and the military. While
many of his contemporaries were busy singing the praises of pluralism in
what they perceived to be a relatively classless society, Mills, less
sanguine, dismissed as absurd the idea that there was no elite. Those
who believed otherwise were uninformed or deluding themselves (and
others) typically for self-serving reasons.

Having confirmed the
existence of a “ruling stratum,” Mills proceeded to describe the
characteristics of the people involved in decisions of national
consequence.

He found the members of the power elite had
strikingly similar social origins. They fruitfully used vast resources
and insular social ties to move across the three institutional
hierarchies in both formal and informal capacities (references to the alumni of the Great Vampire Squid are nigh impossible to avoid).

 

Once
again, the giant financial firm lives up to its reputation as “the
vampire squid.” The Muckety database includes 697 once-removed
connections from Goldman to other Fortune 1000 firms. The map above
shows links of Goldman Sachs directors. Click the graphic to access the
Muckety DB.

The result was (and in my oh so humble opinion, still
is) a robust web of entitlement. Mills concluded that the high and
mighty at mid-century were almost all Christian white males who mostly
came from the “upper third of the income and occupational pyramids.”
Their fathers were “at least of the professional and business strata,
and very frequently higher than that.”

The circle remained
exclusive because real influence, for Mills, was located not in
individuals (where it should be for that would release true creative and
productive energies from said individual into greater society), but in
their access to the “command of major institutions…the necessary bases
of power, of wealth, and of prestige.”

Simply put, the powerful
can and do make use of their resources to set favorable terms by which
to safeguard their position at the top. C. Wright Mills, The Power Elite (New York: Oxford University Press, 1956), 9.

On
the uninformed: “In America today there are in fact tiers and ranges of
wealth and power of which people in the middle and lower ranks know
very little and may not even dream.” The Power Elite, 12.
On the perspective of elites about their own motives: “American men of
power tend, by convention, to deny that they are powerful. No American
runs for office in order to rule or even govern, but only to
serve….Nowadays, such postures have become standard features of the
public-relations programs of all men of power.” 

If you cannot wait for the rest to be published on ZH, you can preview parts two and three on my site now and part 4 and 5 will be published soon.

 

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Tue, 07/17/2012 - 14:47 | 2625186 mediaprizm
mediaprizm's picture

I just love the way you work. Thanks for sharing this great and interesting stuff. Fabulous post! I really enjoyed that. UK Dissertation Help

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 22:59 | 2048696 ElTerco
ElTerco's picture

 

Reggie, that all sounds good, but America was built on the backs of underpaid immigrant labor -- wave after wave of cheap immigrant labor, each wave exploiting the next.  The reality is that if every individual were a Nitzsche's superman, society as we know it would quickly disintegrate.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 22:15 | 2048480 YouThePeople
YouThePeople's picture

Let's start by teaching them how to spell the word lose. There is an epidemic of 'loosers' running around.

Secondly, we should stop referring to the richest people as 'elite'. There are so many better adjectives to describe these creatures.

Wed, 08/01/2012 - 09:12 | 2668234 kall
kall's picture

Good points! I believe this is a matter of mentality rather than education. I have a master degree and I am sorry but I don't think the education institutions are in any way to blame in this situation, it's just too much to think so.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:50 | 2048415 Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd's picture

Religion is the opiate of the masses

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:58 | 2048414 Bartanist
Bartanist's picture

I used to have a strong belief in Good and Evil, despising evil, yet seemingly serving it through my corporate jobs in the military-industrial power complex. It caused problems for me.

Since then some time has passed. I let my instincts lead me away from those kinds of jobs and have opened myself up to some alternative ways of looking at the world. It then occurred to me that it was not evil that I had a problem with, but the self-centeredness that allows people to hurt others. The defining characteristic then became who we served.

- Is it Service to Self (not caring about the effect on others), which seemingly results in what we perceive as evil?

- Is it service to others (and not allowing our actions to infringe on others)? The actions taken to serve others, the whole of humanity, life and creation results in what we perceive as good.

- Or possibly we might not yet have an understanding that to develop ourselves we need to choose and practise one or the other alignments. Instead we allow others to distract us from our reason for being and merrily bob through life as perpetual children?

In our upside down world, those who proclaim the loudest how they serve others, are in fact very highly in tune with serving themselves. Follow the money. Follow the power. Find those who serve themselves and you will see that it all makes sense that the world is screwed up for those who seek to serve others.

Many Jedi and few Siths. Those who serve themselves do not share power. In my view, it is not something one should aspire to regardless of how they have twisted the world with their self-serving propaganda. The education issue is just a symptom.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 22:14 | 2048479 Seasmoke
Seasmoke's picture

+11

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:38 | 2048384 Whoa Dammit
Whoa Dammit's picture

Not to dis the education problem, but I think all of the prescription drugs everyone seems to be taking these days also has a lot to do with the stupidity we are seeing.

I went grocery shopping last Saturday afternoon for the first time in several years (I usually shop earlier when it is less crowded). It was like Thorazine Mannequin City. I had to stop short my shopping cart & go around 3 different middle aged ladies who just suddenly stopped dead in front of me & were staring straight ahead into space, not looking at anything, and not moving. It was really kind of spooky, like they forgot they were supposed to be walking or something.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 23:03 | 2048722 ElTerco
ElTerco's picture

THX-1138 or bust.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 22:15 | 2048482 Seasmoke
Seasmoke's picture

if they were from India, they were in my Shop Rite tonight......very rude people

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:32 | 2048367 Buck Johnson
Buck Johnson's picture

This was a good article.  Our society is done pure and simple.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:24 | 2048328 Trying to Understand
Trying to Understand's picture

Cutting right to the heart of the issue, I believe the source of the 'problem' with our educational system is outside the US Dept. of Education, even outside the USA (as well as all other nations) and has been for several decades.  Why not acknowledge 'that' source?

Taken from the UNESCO (United Nations, wow... how are they involved with education... around the world...??) Publication 356 found at: http://freedom.org/reports/unesco356.htm
Please note the date of 1949 at that link, this isn't something 'new'...

The Role of Education Today

In most countries, especially at the secondary level, schooling lags behind the times. It does not equip the child with the adaptability he requires in a world of rapid change and development, nor does it help the child to become internationally-minded by giving him enough information and interest concerning the life of other nations. Every political, economic or social change, wherever it occurs today, must finally affect the lives and fortunes of people in other countries; and if, in the face of this, our schools attempt to prepare the child only for the way of life in his own particular country, they are failing in their function.

In our time, we need to dedicate education to the service of the human community as a whole. The ideal to be pursued is that, whether in the home, the social environment or the school, our children should be educated to live with others and to prepare themselves for citizenship in a world society. With that kind of education they will be protected against selfish individualism and indiscriminate sociability, both of which are a misdirection of human effort. So far as the school's part in this process is concerned, we may summarize its object as being to secure in the child a sense of community, first in the class, then in the successively larger groups comprised by the school, the neighborhood, and the nation, in a progression of loyalties which will enable him later to reach the climax of membership in the world community. As the corollary to this effort, the school must also equip him with a wider knowledge of the nations and peoples who make up that community.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:03 | 2048291 Diamond Jim
Diamond Jim's picture

one cannot "think outside the box" if you have no hard concepts or things "in the box". Granted schools do not  get you a job, but they should be teaching the basics....3 Rs, civics, American legacy... so all understand what it is to be american and not to waste the opportunity you have in this country... the rest is up to you and what you got in work ethic from your parents.

Re. Trav 7777...from what I have seen, ethnically disadvantaged peoples do score better when given a quality ed and some parental guidance and support. We need to make America work for them as it does for the rest of us.   Like I told my kids...all I expect of you is to do well at school, I'll give you the balance.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:06 | 2048166 AGuy
AGuy's picture

Asset Bubbles are not caused by lack or poor education system. A real estate bubble happened just about everywhere in the world, and its not caused by a poor US education system.

1. China had a real estate bubble that has yet to pop

2. Japan had a huge real estate bubble in the 1980's that popped and its education system is probably the best in the world.

3. Virtually every EU nation took part in the Bubble.

4. Even Issac Newton lost his shirt during the south sea bubble of 1720.

 

Bubbles happen because of greed and easy credit. While its not possible to prevent greed, when credit is restricted bubbles never happen. Its that simple. Apply the appropriate measures and Bubble never happen. If Greenspan had not plunged interest rates we would not have had a bubble. Interest rates should never fall below 6% or no less than 2 times the inflation rate.

 

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:54 | 2048274 Trying to Understand
Trying to Understand's picture

I find it amazing that while almost everyone acknowledges and agrees these "bubbles" are worldwide, international events, yet they are still "blamed on" market conditions.  Easy credit: do you not find it the least bit odd that all nations decided to create easy credit at the same time?  Looks to me more like an orchestrated event to me.  Yes, I've seen the comments about the illuminati and such, and I don't disagree, but to not acknowledge the tool those people are using seems an injustice to ourselves and our nations.  For as long as we acknowledge the source, but not the tool it would seem we allow the tool to continue to be used.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:40 | 2048391 AGuy
AGuy's picture

Or that humans are sheep and herd together. In this case, it was Central banks following the lead of the Fed to avoid their own currencies from soaring in value, killing off their exports. Generally when the US raises it rates foreign Central banks follow in order to prevent capital from leaving there borders. The US Dollar had been the reserve currency and the rest of the central banks followed. In the case of US banks, the Fed demanded that they lower there rates to customers. I remember when Greenspan lowered the overnight rate to 1% and calling up the major US banks telling them to lower their rates to consumers and businesses.

 

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:23 | 2048342 Eric L. Prentis
Eric L. Prentis's picture

Look to Goldman Sachs for the orchestration.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:58 | 2048139 YHC-FTSE
YHC-FTSE's picture

I might as well do an article on, "How Superior British Education is causing the personal debt problem". 

 

My dear Reggie, as with most people who feel they have been disenfranchised in history, you seem to lust after power for the sake of having it with the same passion as those you despise, to pursue as you say, "wealth and social accomplishment" by emulating the very people who are the sickest bastards on the planet. 

You did put in flowery sentiments like "love of people and their environment", but what it boils down to so far is your investigation into the power of the so-called elite simply to emulate them, concluding that DuBois' emphasis on higher education and strong role models were wrong for black people, and you just need instead to copy the elites and get very wealthy quickly in some way that you will probably reveal in your next instalment. 

 

I really like your bullet points 1-7, and it would probably make some interesting lectures, as well as being open to wide abuse from both sides of the political spectrum to indoctrinate young people. I have read literally entire shelves of books devoted to management techniques, and thousands of case studies over the years. The best thing you can possibly do for your workforce, and tomorrow's workforce, is protect and train them to be an important part of acquiring competitive advantage through skills and adaptation in a changing environment. You can't force people to have ambition. You can't force people to work beyond their capabilities, and you certainly can't force people to behave in a manner that is contrary to their nature. Some people are wild predators and others prefer gentle farming. There is no one-size-fits-all strategy for raising people up from their socio-economic group. We are all individuals. 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:39 | 2048245 The Beam
The Beam's picture

You can't force them to be different. But you can teach them how to be an individual. I hardly think he is "disenfranchised". He is stating the truth.

We are taught the same crap in school to simply vomit it back out for whatever standardized test we are taking at the time. We are not free-thinking. That was the basis of the post. It was him saying to think outside of the box and look at WHY successful people are successful (at least that's what I got from it).

Very rarely are we were taught to be individuals.

My best example I can make is this: My mother and father can teach me everything they know and then I only have as much information as they have. However, if they teach me how to- a) find the data on my own, b) analyze it, and c) think outside the box; then the only ceiling I have to my potential is my own hard work.

As for knowing how successful people are successful, that is true also. We should know how they are successful. We should see who they are, why they are there, and how they can be defeated (this is not to say "bankrupting them" but how a person or a company can defeat/join the echolon of that person or company).

Of course, this is just my opinion. I may not fully agree with minor aspects, but I know where he is coming from with his assessment.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:17 | 2048321 YHC-FTSE
YHC-FTSE's picture

Perhaps you're right and this is all about teaching young people to think critically and be individual, instead of emulating the wealthy to get wealthy quickly.

Regretfully and however, according to Reggie, physical, mental and academic abilities simply won't do it - if that is not a statement of disenfranchisement, then what is? He also contends that we must train agents in the education system to be "leaders of thought and missionaries of culture", whatever that means. In my experience, academia does not create slaves or thoughtless automatons - the whole purpose of higher education is to start thinking for yourselves. You get out of life whatever you personally put in to it, and if you do nothing but copy others while at college and learn nothing, then that's your own fault. Putting in agents to disseminate one kind of culture of half baked ideas, is no different, perhaps worse than what the elites do to our education system, which they try to crush at every opportunity. At least nobody tried to indoctrinate me into anything while I was at university and no morale agents watched over my shoulder to tell me how to think or which culture to follow. I don't like the idea of imposing an army of such people into college, because it is just too open to abuse by people who get high on power. Every individual is in charge of his/her own destiny, and good intentions of interference have often wrecked lives instead of enhancing them. That's my opinion.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:36 | 2048378 The Beam
The Beam's picture

See this statement, typically, has me understanding why black people call racism when I  continuely tell them it isn't racism....it's classism (and not to you...but to others.... WE HAVE CLASSISM. It is natural too. With limited resources, people who have it, don't want to lose it).

I continue to tell my black friends that it's not racism because I can take a black person out of the urban area and put them in a suburban area or rural area, and they can get the same education that I, as a white person, gets.

I would ask though, you really think George W. Bush is smart than Prescott? Anywhere close? Do we think David is smarter than John D the first? There are plenty of examples of this.  You can go to names and even institutuions.

It's about keeping their status. Truthfully, in my opinion, I think it about legacy and keeping their name forever!

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 21:52 | 2048425 YHC-FTSE
YHC-FTSE's picture

I think I understand, and there is a great deal of merit in what you wrote about the whole thing being a class barrier that limits the upward mobility of the lower classes, and keeping the legacy of the elites. The recent stats on population certainly confirm it.

I shall have to wait for the next instalment of Reggie's efforts to find out if the class barrier is what he is proposing to banish. It's a very tall order....he's not the first to climb that particular wall.

Tue, 01/10/2012 - 10:44 | 2049983 The Beam
The Beam's picture

Exactly. Very tall order indeed. And that status is not easily given up by the legacy holders.

One thing I must note, a lot of people on both sides (I will admit in my experience it is more proportiately minorities) confuse racism with classism.

If we can come to a conclussion on the issues of the topic, then we could have a clearer debate on it. Thus, I also look forward to the next installment.

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:54 | 2048128 onlooker
onlooker's picture

  

No original thinking is the most time rule. Do not debate the teacher. Go along to get along. Then if one is bright enough to get through that, and has social skills to charm and persuade--- America can be yours.

 

Or, be the child of the ruling elite and be taught the true rules of the road and where your place is about the rest.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:53 | 2048124 aka_ces
aka_ces's picture

As these bubbles are global, it's not just the American educational system that's lacking.  

One would have thought that European sophistication, and ancient Chinese wisdom, would have intervened outside the US, but no ...

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:52 | 2048119 Stax Edwards
Stax Edwards's picture

I agree with your premise in the article but not the title!

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:43 | 2048085 Diamond Jim
Diamond Jim's picture

Let's go back to the 3 "R"s. If one graduated high school in the late 60s or even early 70s one will know what I am speaking of. It took hard work and rote memorization of things (g-d forbid) plus a lot more to "get us to the moon". Today's schooling is based on attendance (you get a "D" just for showing up), self esteem building and diversity teaching with re-written text books (similar to a "living" Constitution). It is not a school but a baby sitting  institution. If you graduate high school today and cannot write a simple sentence, tell me that 2+2 is four (not 5 and you get half credit because you were "close"), and that you read "vampire" comic books then all that self-esteem crap will not get you a job. I don't care how fast your little thumbs can text or how fast you can find the answer to 2+2 on your I-pod. Just look at the horrid scores on the (biased, I know) SAT scores...compare the US on math and reading skills compared to the rest of the world and you will know why we have to keep foreign born Ph. D.s in this country with special visas and money, becasue students today would rather get a degree in Ethnic Gender Diversity based studies....take a degree in math ??? or engineering....too hard, too much work, too busy i need instant gratification through Facebook or Wei games.

The problem with what you suggest is that...these things are the job of PARENTS damn it. The school's should be teaching what the kids need to get a job, and keep this country at the top. The parents will take care of self-esteem as would getting better grades in school, parents need to teach the kids how to enjoy life, philantrophy, religion, Legacy. Parents need to get the kids to school, let 'em play when they get home, then eat dinner and get to your homework (oh the agony). We need to re-consider just throwing money at Education...pay for performance. And to get that performance..get rid of these teachers with an Education degree (any idiot can put together a daily planner), put teachers in place that have at minimum a Masters degree in their specialty. get the kids out in the real world...visit a local business to see what it really is all about. Got mis-behaving, fidgety students...over weight...bring back phys ed....do some push ups, ran a little....But most important is to get them off their asses...and quit overdosing them with ADD drugs.

Parts 2, 3, ...20 after you come up with more gobbledigook.......

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:47 | 2048261 The Beam
The Beam's picture

Hey, how is that education working out for my father (who has spent his entire life in a factory)? His boy makes almost as much as he does and is happier with his job.

I love my father. I always will. I am thankful for him and my mother. Not for giving birth, but for everything he taught me. He taught me himself. He bought me the Wall Street Journal and started teaching me about interest also (via CDs) at an early age. He also taught me to think outside the box.

The one thing I can't understand is why he taught me, but didn't do it himself. Possibly life lessons I guess.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:45 | 2048259 g speed
g speed's picture

You are correct- school is a baby sitting institution  However you're wrong on some other points. It is not the job of schools to teach what the kids need to get a job. That job should be done by the institution offering the work. Schools (private schools) should teach history, language. basic mathmatics and logic, civics, and basic biology and chemistry, all entry level stuff to get into a corporation school that will teach you what you need to make them competitive. It wouldn't matter if it was the Mayo Clinic or GM -- the effort put toward the best education possible would be profit driven. There should under no circumstance be any govt involvement in education ever at any level period. Quest for higher learning will drive the seeker to find it where ever it is. Govt is obsolete and should be muzzled like a mad dog.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:02 | 2048151 trav7777
trav7777's picture

huh?  American students' scores on the SAT are among the top in the world if you just take whites and asians while you are comparing to other nations that just have whites and asians.

Where the US system falls down is that blacks and hispanics perform poorly.  There's no way to sugarcoat or wish strenuously around it.

ANY article which does not point this out is not worth reading.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:54 | 2048273 The Beam
The Beam's picture

One can correlate it better to Urban versus Suburban and Rural areas. It isn't a white versus black thing there, it is a socioeconomic thing. In fact you can go further and get a better correlation with in "white people" to prove the theory. "White kids" in schools with parents in the higher income bracket do better than "white kids" with parents in a lower income bracket.

Any post that ignores THAT fact isn't worth reading :-)

LOL... even though I read it. I joke, I joke, I kid, I kid.

But I was serious about the data. Look it up for yourself! 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:39 | 2048079 Georgesblog
Georgesblog's picture

We are trained to be good, little corporate widgets, never questioning the validity of the currency or the economic system for which it stands.  If anyone asks, we are to say that the USD is money. If anyone insists otherwise, it is war. We are to isolate and ostracize currency heretics.  At all costs, the people may perish, but the currency and the Federal Reserve stands. If that isn't perverted patriotism, then government school indoctrination has done it's job, because people don't see it. When the currency collapse comes, they won't believe that it ever happened.

http://georgesblogforum.wordpress.com/2011/11/02/the-daily-climb-2/

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:52 | 2048072 MachoMan
MachoMan's picture

Reggie,

The entire premise of your post is naively optimistic.  The truth is that an incredible amount of these functions or prospective tools for ascent are simply NOT TAUGHT by any educational institution.  For example, you cannot teach someone to be a "rule breaker."  Inherently, many of the best ideals and the actions stemming therefrom simply have no genesis in academia or public education (although, might be a reaction thereto).

The entire education system, at this juncture, is little more than a terrible babysitter.  Having a state mandated babysitter has, in turn, caused parents to give up on the notion of doing the job themselves.  For example, how many kids help dad fix the family station wagon?  Or alternatively, the two (2) wage earner family model has caused demand for the parental roles to be further outsourced to the state...  leading to the same result.  Probably a cycle of a little bit of both.

In the end, it's not the fault of the state or the educational system...  it's the fault of parents.  Collectively, we have simply decided to spend the time we used to spend repairing the old car, gardening, canning, doing minor repairs, cleaning house, maintaining the yard, or even balancing the checkbook, on completely different activities, largely purely consumptive in nature (and on credit no less).  In large part, this can all be explained by the rise of the middle class and the massive increase in our standard of living.  We simply got to a point where these familial acitivies were no longer born from necessity and, as a result, we dispensed with them (and, to a certain extent, outsourced to the state).

Much of your complaints about the educational system are going to be fixed as it is deleveraged and these aspects migrate back towards the home.  The humility of a debt free existence and the necessity to be productive or, alternatively, to do something actually useful will cause people to learn more about "life". 

As far as any notion of the public educational system being the mechanism of upward mobility, I strongly encourage you to dispense with the naive fantasy.  The simple fact is that there are an incredible amount of people who have simply laid down...  that literally have no desire to do anything useful or helpful.  These people willfully accept bondage of not only themselves, but their fellow citizens.  Likewise, the upper crust has no plans of being uprooted and has an incredible stranglehold on the regulatory environment, thereby making upward mobility an impossibility unless a new entrant is desired.  THIS IS THE WAY IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN AND ALWAYS WILL BE.  While there may be a few that make it from rags to riches so to speak, you're arguing the exception and not the rule...  which is no basis for the cost of an educational system...  or, at least, certainly not one that attempts to cater to all.    

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:31 | 2048060 apberusdisvet
apberusdisvet's picture

The severity of the problem is quite clear when 9 million (some say more)mortgages were accepted at amounts that were greater than 5 times the borrowers h/h income. 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:04 | 2047979 John_Coltrane
John_Coltrane's picture

The article makes a very cogent case for the need for better writing skills, especialy the use of topic sentences in paragraphs.  These topic sentences should be related to the other ideas in the paragraph to avoid confusion on the part of the reader.  LOL

Tue, 01/10/2012 - 00:36 | 2049088 covert
covert's picture

what all of us have in common is the love of the absolute total freedom of enterprize.

http://covert.mypressonline.com

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:29 | 2047966 Major Miner
Major Miner's picture

I am grateful to my mom and dad for making the sacrifice to send me to a very competitive private school.  It didn't make me rich or powerful, but I answer a lot of questions when playing along with Jeopardy on tv.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 23:30 | 2048858 ceilidh_trail
ceilidh_trail's picture

CLS?

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 18:54 | 2047957 adr
adr's picture

Reggie the problem is Americans are being taught that working for a living is for chumps. The only ways to get rich are to take big risks in the stock market, get kicked in the nuts for a YouTube video, or figure out how to break into a rapper or sport star's posse. The media and educators aren't only telling everyone they should be millionares, they are making it look wrong to not strive to make money from nothing. When a couple kids can get $250 million in venture funding for a terrible idea with no viable business plan, why teach kids sound fundamentals of anything. The glorification of the abosolute trash of our society has ensured our destructon.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 18:51 | 2047950 MobBarley
MobBarley's picture

Oh the house niggah is getting uppity with his edumacation now

to say yall whiteys stupid and let the communist j00z destroy the

country from the inside. I getz it.

Uppity house niggah!

 

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 23:31 | 2048862 323
323's picture

Hey mob, where you live? Maybe we could go get a beer bottle sometime!

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:14 | 2048004 NotApplicable
NotApplicable's picture

Must be sad existence when this is the best thing you can find to do with your time.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:10 | 2047994 Zero Govt
Zero Govt's picture

been an arsehole all your life?

Tue, 01/10/2012 - 00:08 | 2049005 Imminent Crucible
Imminent Crucible's picture

Mob has been hitting the Barley too hard.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 19:31 | 2048058 I am more equal...
I am more equal than others's picture

Like any skill you must work at it - the harder and longer you really work at it the better you become.  Unfortunately, such skills can go unrecognized and you can fall into despair when no one notices the honed skills.  This 'gentleman' has been duly recognized. 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 18:51 | 2047947 Zero Govt
Zero Govt's picture

Dearest Reggie,

Many fine words.. too many fine words in fact.

We have one failed (State) education system. Like all Western problem solvers however you simply cannot wait to meddle (in society) replacing one bunch of meddlers with a new set

We don't need 'leaders' to lead us anywhere however well meaning Reggie.

Leave society well the fuck alone.

All we need is to rid ourselves of meddler in Chief, that monopoly institution called Govt. Zero Govt leaves zero strangling of a free society and our free markets. 

Then . . . . Bingo

societies most creative individuals will provide a basket of dozens even hundreds of different methods... not one education system but many different offerings, more than any one man or committee could ever imagine

all we need is freedom (from Govt)... the rest will sort itself out

 

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 20:04 | 2048159 trav7777
trav7777's picture

we don't have a failed education system.  It works well for whites and asians.

What we have are failed races that perform poorly irrespective of any amount of money or other remedial measures that are attempted.

Mon, 01/09/2012 - 23:29 | 2048854 323
323's picture

Man I'm getting tired of your lazy, reductive thinking. The model is not the subject, douchebag.

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