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Visualizing The World's Gold Mines And Deposits

Tyler Durden's picture





 

After examining data from all public, private, and government sponsored companies, research shows there are 439 undeveloped deposits or producing mines in the world. Visual Capitalist provides the following infographic showing that there are 113.9 billion tonnes of in-situ gold on earth, where it is located, and how rare are the largest gold deposits.

 

 

and the full report here:

 

NRH Research 2012 World Gold Deposits

 


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Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:42 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Hey, go for it, mine Peeble. I never cared for wild NW salmon anyway...

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:31 | Link to Comment Bay of Pigs
Bay of Pigs's picture

Is there any topic you don't troll on?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:43 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Funny you should mention that, why it was just the other day:

 

I discuss peak oil, AGW, precious metal miners, the rest is a bloody waste of time...

  BTW, I actually love wild salmon from the Pacific North West, in case I was junked for saying otherwise...

3013492

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:29 | Link to Comment CrazyCooter
CrazyCooter's picture

Those who make a living on the fisheries in and around the pebble area do have genuine cause for worry.

However, I will also point out that "the Pacific North West" is extremely vast and sparsely populated. Get out a map, understand the scale, and go from Bellingham to the Aelutian chain. If you ran population numbers on that, it would be well under the head count of most states in the union and an area multiples larger.

I don't know if I support it or not, but it isn't for me to decide anyway. Personally, I think "international poaching" (i.e. unregulated high seas rape of fisheries) is a much bigger problem, but just my $.02. The realist in me observes that there is never been a profitable mine in AK that has been turned down. But, the environmental stuff is pretty crazy these days (e.g. from ANWR to a lost list of fed/state clashes over usage rights from hunting to snow mobiles).

If I were to gamble the fisherman will probably lose this one over time.

You can follow the Pebble story over at the AK DNR web site where most of the permitting stuff is public.

http://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/mining/largemine/pebble/

Regards,

Cooter

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:36 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

How do you discount the value of a unique fishery and compare it to the value large  but hardly unique Cu sulfide deposit?

The Cu/Au is replaceable, the fish are not....

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 03:11 | Link to Comment CrazyCooter
CrazyCooter's picture

Apparently the same way you can respond in the "Kings English" yet fail to comprehend it?

Regards,

Cooter

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 10:08 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

All I implied is that Peeble is likely to go (for the reasons you cite) but in the long run it is folly....

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:26 | Link to Comment Newager23
Newager23's picture

When you look at these numbers they point to mining companies - who own the gold in the ground - becoming valuable. Deposits greater than 2 million oz are rare, and deposits greater than 4 million oz are extremely rare. My investment philosophy is to buy these stocks while they are cheap and wait for the world to wake-up to the fact that these assets (gold in the ground) are incredibly valuable.

Mining companies are primarily valued on four main factors: 1) Gold in the ground, 2) Production ounces, 3) The price of gold, and 4) Cash cost per oz. You can forecast production, the price of gold, and cash costs. Thus, the most important factor - and we can know it in advance - is how much gold a company has in the ground.

If you know a company has a 2 million oz deposit or greater, then you can forecast the other three factors and identify incredibly cheap stocks. If at some point, the investment community discovers that these deposits are valuable, then we could very well have a mania in mining stocks - for these large deposits.

If you want to learn more about how to value mining stocks, check out this link:

http://www.goldsilverdata.com/mining-101.html 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:18 | Link to Comment GoldmanSux
GoldmanSux's picture

Pebble will likely never be built under any circumstances. The market has come to accept this as the stock is down around 80% in the last year. Donlin will never be built unless there is an extended period of time when metal prices rise at a much faster pace than construction cost. Not the case today.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:37 | Link to Comment CrazyCooter
CrazyCooter's picture

Basis for Pebble going under the bus?

Not butting heads, just looking to see someone articulate the position.

Regards,

Cooter

Sat, 12/01/2012 - 00:44 | Link to Comment GoldmanSux
GoldmanSux's picture

Cost has always been a major concern, being in the utmost remote location. But more recently, regulatory. Study on the significant effects on the salmon runs in the area have kiboshed the stock.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 05:31 | Link to Comment Urban Redneck
Urban Redneck's picture

That ignores non-financial (e.g. political) risk, in an environment of rising prices.

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 07:48 | Link to Comment overmedicatedun...
overmedicatedundersexed's picture

newager23, of course all the .govs of the world will let mines stay in private hands if gold goes much higher..rule of law and all...ask the GM bond holders it will give them a laugh.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:44 | Link to Comment Stuck on Zero
Stuck on Zero's picture

Corzine:  It's easier to re-hypothecate than to mine.

 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:36 | Link to Comment FreedomGuy
FreedomGuy's picture

When interest rates are zero and money is easy it is far more profitable and simple to play with money than actually produce anything of value.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:15 | Link to Comment DoChenRollingBearing
DoChenRollingBearing's picture

No, no, no.  You bitchez have it all wrong.  Gold comes from the coin shop!

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:35 | Link to Comment knukles
knukles's picture

The coin shoppe or....
How in the world can anybody retain an ounce (pun intended) of integrity by making a statement as to the total amount of gold mined in human history?

That's when I stop reading.
Period.

 

First, that number was arrived at years ago by somebody guessing.
Second, to make such a claim is infantile egomania
Lastly, it doesn't even matter

 

Such Horseshit
And that's from a chap who has been and remains very bullish on gold and silver.

I know when I'm being bent over....

 

Next meme'll be the Annanuki return to reclaim the lost gold on 12/21/12, etc., etc., etc.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 04:41 | Link to Comment stacking12321
stacking12321's picture

so, because you are ignorant of a fact, you must assume everyone else is also ignorant and cannot possibly know the answer?

i challenge you to prove your insinuation that this quantity is un-knowable, within some reasonable margin of error.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 03:56 | Link to Comment Cast Iron Skillet
Cast Iron Skillet's picture

ha, ha! ... and feathers come from pillows - Zsa Zsa Gabor

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:46 | Link to Comment The Shootist
The Shootist's picture

It's all fun and games until you watch those miserable failures on the History channel try to mine the Klondike. (At least they tried, Peeeyah!)

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:35 | Link to Comment knukles
knukles's picture

Did one of 'em get their eye poked out?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 11:05 | Link to Comment MachoMan
MachoMan's picture

As the soup always liked to note (on gay shows), Jack Hoffman loved to root around in the glory hole...

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:46 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

I got sucked in by the allure of the Hollister deposit (GBG).... no mas....

I do still own RBY.... AngloGold Ashanti is another basket case....

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:46 | Link to Comment icanhasbailout
icanhasbailout's picture

we were overdue to invade Canada again anyway

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:54 | Link to Comment Mr Lennon Hendrix
Mr Lennon Hendrix's picture

You must be British.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:58 | Link to Comment The Shootist
The Shootist's picture

No, I think Nathaniel Green tried to take some Canadian city. Failed, we probably sent our freshman c squad.  ;)

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:20 | Link to Comment CCanuck
CCanuck's picture

d post

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:50 | Link to Comment CrazyCooter
CrazyCooter's picture

Yeah, any nation that wants to invade either the US or the Canada is crazy; our dipshit politicos are doing a fine job of burning the house down.

Never invade a gun owning population. It don't work. Wait for the gov't to reel 'em in, otherwise best of luck.

As far as Canada in particular, one might understand the weather that would crush the soul of lesser folks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnHWiA1Cr_E

Regards,

Cooter

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:25 | Link to Comment Supernova Born
Supernova Born's picture

Fuck invading Canada. They are the last hope of the Western Hemisphere. The only passport I've got is with a chicken-shit Latin American newbie.

Canada just needs to publish the cost of a resident visa (in gold) and build some nukes, because America only fucks with the "have-nots".

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:07 | Link to Comment CPL
CPL's picture

Invade?  That was old blue eyes Mulroney, the man that destroyed the Conservative Party of Canada, that opened the door there.

 

The US is on every street corner.  Starbucks, Walmart, Michaels, EBGames, Chinese deliver, Pizza pizza, a bank...the cookie cutter california strip mall mould should have been a good sign.   We live in the semi-tundra 6 months of the year, who in their right mind in Canada would build a strip mall in tundra.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:38 | Link to Comment Bay of Pigs
Bay of Pigs's picture

Canada's BNN (Business News Network) has "fiscal cliff" stories going 24/7 just like CNN and the BlowHorn.

It isn't by accident, just moar MSM brainwashing.

Sat, 12/01/2012 - 02:53 | Link to Comment natty light
natty light's picture

You still got the Tim Hortons eh.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:17 | Link to Comment CCanuck
CCanuck's picture

Ya cause it work so well in 1812 Eh.

Ccanuck

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:44 | Link to Comment Bear
Bear's picture

Crap ... Do we really need more debt?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:25 | Link to Comment unrulian
unrulian's picture

Go for it....we sent your asses packing last time with a couple of trappers and some indians...we even burnt down the white house...

 

ok, ok i like talking tough, it might take you 5 minutes and a couple of drones now.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:48 | Link to Comment Zgangsta
Zgangsta's picture

Apparently, there's enough gold mixed in the molten core of the earth to coat the entire world in a layer four meters thick.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:27 | Link to Comment Supernova Born
Supernova Born's picture

Four meters thick? Just like the skulls of those who'd believe it.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:00 | Link to Comment Zgangsta
Zgangsta's picture

Gold doesn't form naturally on earth.  It was placed here by divine intervention in the form of meteors.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/09/110907-gold-metals-earth...

What little that ended up in the crust is the result of volcanic eruptions.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:37 | Link to Comment knukles
knukles's picture

See, I told ya somebody'd go off the fucking deep end....

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 11:50 | Link to Comment Thisson
Thisson's picture

There is gold mixed in with everything in the planet - including seawater.  It is just not cost-efficient to distill it.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:33 | Link to Comment Amagnonx
Amagnonx's picture

I have bad news for you pal, the earth does not have a molten core - molten core and tooth fairy both originated by the same people.

 

The earth, sun and every celestial object that has a magnetic field has an energetic centre - call it a black hole if thats your lingo, but it is a nuclear engine - in my terminology, a super particle.

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:37 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Wow, where did they teach you this?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:00 | Link to Comment Orly
Orly's picture

You have a lot to learn yet, flak.  Energetic planetary cores, abiotic oil, cosmic ray effects, galactic black holes...

All these things are going to soon come to greater knowledge and you are going to sit and believe that dinosaurs and seaweed fuel our planet; that a little puny animal can possibly alter the evolutionary course of entire worlds.

Keep believing all that stuff and watch the world pass you right by; bagging groceries at 55.

Expand your mind, let the fact that you don't know anything at all envelope you, make you curious.  As it stands now, you're a hubristic smartass who knows how to use an engineering calculator.  It would behoove you to use your gift to question what you believe, not prove how smart you are(n't) to the rest of us.

_______

You won't learn the ways of the world by looking outside.  You don't learn quantum mechanics, the ties that bind, by looking outside of things.  You learn them by looking inside.  And the further you look inside, the more you'll find that what you just knew to be true has been turned on its head and that you didn't really know a damned thing after all.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:18 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Could you now describe for us all a mechanism for producing a planetary magnetic field that is consistent with all observed data?

It sounds like you might have  read The Dancing Wu Li Masters and waked away with fluff and not the meat....

PS I learned Quantum Mechanics 35 years ago. Have you ever performed Young's Double Slit experiment? I now leave you to your psuedo-scientific babbling... 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:28 | Link to Comment Orly
Orly's picture

I have, actually.  In my head.  It says that photons act as both particles and waves but leave residual wave-like observable characteristics.

Now, smartass, tell me why.

And who the hell is Wu Li?

______________

"Could you now describe for us all a mechanism for producing a planetary magnetic field that is consistent with all observed data?"

No.  Can you?  Difference between you and me is I don't pretend to already know everything.

And if you seriously did do quantum mechanics 35 years ago, then there is no hope for you.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:51 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

You are a poster child for the D-K effect....

Do an experiment and spin up a sphrere of basically molten iron and tell us what happens... In your explanation be sure to take into account that Fe is a conductor with a net magnetic dipole moment...

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 10:38 | Link to Comment Lebensphilosoph
Lebensphilosoph's picture

The experimental ensemble can be modeled by a statistical distribution known as as 'wave function' that solves the Schroedinger equation for that system and can be approximated by treating the motion of the center of this distribution as a point particle in certain conditions that depend on the wavelength relative to the size of the system. It's mathematical wizardry. That doesn't make a 'particle' a 'wave' (a logical impossibility).

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 12:18 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Are you trying to describe a wave packet?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:31 | Link to Comment ThirdWorldDude
ThirdWorldDude's picture

"The Way that can be spoken of,

is not the constant Way;

if one man asks for the Way

and another one replies him,

neither of them knows the Way..."

 

                                                     ~ Tao Te Ching

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:36 | Link to Comment Orly
Orly's picture

This guy is such a jackass.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:04 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

So, does ~100 dead make Sandy a real storm? I think you owe us all something, don't you?

Or did you forget that little exchange?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 04:46 | Link to Comment stacking12321
stacking12321's picture

is it not the case,

that ThirdWolrdDude asked the way,

and you replied him?

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 18:26 | Link to Comment smiler03
smiler03's picture

And there was me thinking Orly was intelligent. Ooops.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 10:29 | Link to Comment Lebensphilosoph
Lebensphilosoph's picture

You won't learn the ways of the world by looking outside? Is that why reductionist scientists get all the girls?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 15:45 | Link to Comment Amagnonx
Amagnonx's picture

If you teach people things, that infers they remember and repeat rather than critically analyze and synthesize.

 

The theory I refer to is called Prime Force theory - which postulates an infinite spectrum of helical quantum radiation that composes all space, infinite in magnitude, elasticity, frequency and velocity.  Being helical it is available in two flavors, right and left handed - these vectors are in equilibrium, and by inspection we can see that they must also be at maximum moment.

 

The Prime Force is not energy, or matter - not electromagnetic.

 

Gravity is then described by a vector inequilibrium, whereby massive objects absorb and alter the frequency of radiation from the vacuum - so the force from above the suface is greater than the remaining vector that penetrates a body  -causing gravitational force.

 

Particles are a kind of spiral manifold (vortex), I theorize a double torus in which incident quantum radiation is converged and interacts to create new frequencies which are emitted at a normal to the plane of the spiral - convergence is a result of the moment provided by asymetrical helixs.  Electrons emit charge and magnetism (and almost certainly a range of other frequencies) which are the right and left handed versions of the same radiation.  Protons absorb charge and magnetism, and emit other frequencies.

 

There exist super particles, which absorb an extremely wide range of frequencies, these we call stars, and planets. They emit a wide range of frequencies and their emiisions create matter through interference.  They throw out particles of simple matter- hydrogen, helium for example - these are trapped in a stars corona - under the corona there is a lot of empty space.  In planets, this matter is not as energetic, it forms in the same kind of corona - but cools and forms heavier elements, principally iron, of course.

 

I also theorize that living creatures form around particles (or those particles arise when life is created) which are of a higher frequency than interacts normally with our electromagnetic universe - and conciousness is due to resonance between our physical universe and higher frequencies - the observer, or conciousness absorbs certain frequencies (of which information is one) and emits other frequencies (one of which causes the effect of measurement).  The emissions cause resonant interactions within our electromagnetic universe - quantum interference.  This is why measurement is a continuum (interference and resonance), it explains double slit experiments and the problem of the non existence of the physical universe with respect to the observer (the observer does not exist in the physical universe, but rather at a higher quantuum frequency).

 

Part of my extended theory is that the earth has a super particle inside it, generating heat, plasma and other matter.  This dovetails with evidence of the increasing mass and dimension of the earth.

 

Of course - this is nothing to do with the standard model, which I no longer hold to - special relativity is pure bunk, and general relativity is also bunk.  Special relativity is bunk by inspection (I could explain, but it should be obvious) general relativity does not provide causation for gravitaional effect, neither does it adequately explain the instantaneous effect of gravity (though it tries, through circular reasoning and a few mathemtical gimmicks).

The relationships between time space and matter are amply defined by Prime Force theory - and account for all deformation of matter under acelleration and time dilation.  Simply these affects can be considered to the doppler effect on the topography of the particles - in the most general and simple sense.

 

Obviously - this is the most simplistic and brief version possible - but I am happy to say that I am far more convinced by this theory than by the standard model.

 

The basis of the Prime Force theory is purely empirical, including gravity and particle formation - my further expansions can be considered metaphysics.  I consider it honest - unlike all the so called modern theoretical physicists - which if they had a shred of honesty would admit they are well into metaphysics themselves - ie dark matter, dark energy .. (which are unecessary in Prime Force models btw).

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:52 | Link to Comment Flakmeister
Flakmeister's picture

Most of the big deposits are actually copper plays... e.g. Donlin Creek, another POS investment....

 

Edit: The lists are a who's-who of bad investments... anyone out there remember La Cristinas?, a.ka. KRY? 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:51 | Link to Comment Sancho Ponzi
Sancho Ponzi's picture

I miss MATH MAN

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:07 | Link to Comment BigJim
BigJim's picture

Yes, silver cost $5 an ounce to out of the ground.

I, for one, never got tired of him telling us the shit was everywhere.

( /s in case anyone didn't notice) 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:55 | Link to Comment Zgangsta
Zgangsta's picture

Now wait a cotton picking minute!

Tyler says "there are 113.9 billion tonnes of in-situ gold on earth"

But the infographic says "COMBINED THESE DEPOSITS HOLD 3,015,542,164 oz (about 85,500 metric tons) of in-situ gold in 113.9 billion tonnes of earth"

The latter makes a lot more sense...

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:05 | Link to Comment BigJim
BigJim's picture

Yup, bit of shark-jumping going on round here tonight. 113.9 billion tonnes of gold? LOL!

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 13:03 | Link to Comment Anasteus
Anasteus's picture

Yes, I read the same, combined the deposits hold 3,015,542,164 oz of gold (93,783.3 metric tons) in 113.9 billion tonnes of earth. That means, combined the deposits hold about 93,783 metric tons of in-situ gold. That gives a whole different picture from that inferred from the text.

Perhaps Friday humour...

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 06:27 | Link to Comment Cap Matifou
Cap Matifou's picture

+1

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 11:55 | Link to Comment Thisson
Thisson's picture

It's an error.  The ounces of gold are contained in tonnes of ore.  That's what those ratios are, with the average being 1.06 ounces of gold per tonne of ore.  Ratios below 1.00 are more costly to extract and typically require novel mining methods such as large scale block cave open stope mining.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:56 | Link to Comment Híppos Purrós
Híppos Purrós's picture

Tyler, that's actually Au 3B oz in 113B tonnes of earth/rock... Erratum.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:59 | Link to Comment Manipuflation
Manipuflation's picture

The humor is duly appreciated.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:00 | Link to Comment ArgentoFisico
ArgentoFisico's picture

No China in the list? I thought it was the bigger producer today.. no gold to be mined in the future?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:22 | Link to Comment rsi1
rsi1's picture

it disappeared into a black hole.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:30 | Link to Comment unrulian
unrulian's picture

yea.....the one at the center of the earth....morons

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:29 | Link to Comment laomei
laomei's picture

China keeps pretty much every bit of information about oil and gold deposits found in-country on the downlow.  Having run across people in the industry here, it's actually quite frustrating.  They know where a bunch of stuff is, but can't do anything about it or say anything.  It's all undeclared, but there's a bunch of it.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 21:59 | Link to Comment 13thWarrior
13thWarrior's picture

Al Qaeda in Western Pakistan?

Reason: Gold mine of Reko Diq http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reko_Diq

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:00 | Link to Comment Hayabusa
Hayabusa's picture

With unemployment so high this is good... if one has aspirations to be a gold miner.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 11:57 | Link to Comment Thisson
Thisson's picture

Not really.  Production costs per ounce are going through the roof.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:00 | Link to Comment ali-ali-al-qomfri
ali-ali-al-qomfri's picture

can we please see the Tungsten mines and deposits……..just sayin’

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:09 | Link to Comment Manipuflation
Manipuflation's picture

Just don't get Roy Sebagged.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:09 | Link to Comment Ignorance is bliss
Ignorance is bliss's picture

Yes, I have the ability to look in a hole and determine how much gold remains./sarc off

 

If it isn't in your possession, then you don't own it.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:39 | Link to Comment knukles
knukles's picture

And if its in an LBMA vault it might not even be there...

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:13 | Link to Comment tmosley
tmosley's picture

That's gold ORE Tyler.  A little over 3 billion oz of actual gold.

That's why most of it won't be mined for a very, very long time.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:23 | Link to Comment gwar5
gwar5's picture

Thank you

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 11:59 | Link to Comment Thisson
Thisson's picture

It actually does not take very long to mine it.  Look at average mine life, it's usually < 15 years or so.  The problem is that it's not necessarily cost-effective to mine all of these deposits at current prices.

 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:21 | Link to Comment gwar5
gwar5's picture

Does the government include above ground and below ground gold in their calculatons now?  That would be telling.

 

 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:21 | Link to Comment gwar5
gwar5's picture

Does the government include above ground and below ground gold in their calculatons now?  That would be telling.

 

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 05:28 | Link to Comment jmcadg
jmcadg's picture

I believe below ground deposits were washed away by Sandy!

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 05:29 | Link to Comment jmcadg
jmcadg's picture

Sorry I thought you were talking about Tungsten, my bad.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:32 | Link to Comment unrulian
unrulian's picture

Most of the above ground previously mined gold lies at the bottom of rivers...

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:30 | Link to Comment Bansters-in-my-...
Bansters-in-my- feces's picture

"I licked my Gold today....and I liked it"...

 

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 22:56 | Link to Comment Gypsyducks
Gypsyducks's picture

Fort Knox 147,200,000 oz. Grade: Dubious

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:45 | Link to Comment helping_friendl...
helping_friendly_book's picture

Current Report: October 31, 2012


Department of the Treasury
Financial Management Service
STATUS REPORT OF U.S. TREASURY-OWNED GOLD
October 31, 2012 Summary Fine Troy Ounces Book Value       Gold Bullion 258,641,878.074 $10,920,429,098.79 Gold Coins, Blanks, Miscellaneous 2,857,048.173 120,630,859.39       Total 261,498,926.247 11,041,059,958.18       Mint-Held Gold - Deep Storage             Denver, CO 43,853,707.279 1,851,599,995.81   Fort Knox, KY 147,341,858.382 6,221,097,412.78   West Point, NY 54,067,331.379 2,282,841,677.17 Subtotal - Deep Storage Gold 245,262,897.040 10,355,539,085.76       Mint-Held Treasury Gold - Working Stock       All locations - Coins, blanks, miscellaneous 2,783,218.656 117,513,614.74 Subtotal - Working Stock Gold 2,783,218.656 117,513,614.74       Grand Total - Mint-Held Gold 248,046,115.696 10,473,052,700.50       Federal Reserve Bank-Held Gold           Gold Bullion:       Federal Reserve Banks - NY Vault 13,376,987.715 564,805,850.63   Federal Reserve Banks - display 1,993.319 84,162.40 Subtotal - Gold Bullion 13,378,981.034 564,890,013.03       Gold Coins:       Federal Reserve Banks - NY Vault 73,452.066 3,101,307.82   Federal Reserve Banks - display 377.451 15,936.81 Subtotal - Gold Coins 73,829.571 3,117.244.63       Total - Federal Reserve Bank-Held Gold 13,452,810.551 568,007,257.66       Total - Treasury-Owned Gold 261,498,926.247 $11,041,059,958.16      

Deep Storage: Deep-Storage gold is the portion of the U.S. government-owned Gold Bullion Reserve that the U.S. Mint secures in sealed vaults, which are examined annually by the Department of Treasury's Office of the Inspector General. Deep-Storage gold comprises the vast majority of the Reserve and consists primarily of gold bars. This portion was formerly called "Bullion Reserve" or "Custodial Gold Bullion Reserve."

Working Stock: Working-Stock gold is the portion of the U.S. government-owned Gold Bullion Reserve that the U.S. Mint uses as the raw material for minting congressionally authorized coins. Working-Stock gold comprises only about 1 percent of the Reserve and consists of bars, blanks, unsold coins, and condemned coins. This portion was formerly listed as individual coins and blanks or called "PEF Gold."

 

http://www.fms.treas.gov/gold/current.html

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 09:33 | Link to Comment fleur de lis
fleur de lis's picture

Does anybody believe anything the government says about money? What is the purpose of this? Why do they bother? Seriously? We all know it's a ponzi, it's just that they have the upper hand. If any of us told half of these lies about money we'd be in jail, but they get tax-funded raises, bonuses, and benefits.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:24 | Link to Comment Fix It Again Timmy
Fix It Again Timmy's picture

Here it is again, with apologies....:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BiXIs3bbETA

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:50 | Link to Comment Amagnonx
Amagnonx's picture

Best news story ever.  One can see she is trying to make a good case for the dollar vs gold, like the good little robot she is - it just all seems slightly out of her reach intellectually.

 

I like when she says, ' and the dollar which is backed by the US Federal Reserve is going to be around a year from now' implying that gold isn't. 

 

The evaporation of my gold often weighs on my mind, and I like to weigh it often to reasssure myself - the amount of gold that has evaporated from central banks vaults lately is certainly a cause for continued alarm.

Thu, 11/29/2012 - 23:56 | Link to Comment americanspirit
americanspirit's picture

Yeah the oceans are full of gold too. Good luck processing it. This article ( in spite of the egregious miscalculation in the title) does make the point that all the high grade sources are just about played out. It takes energy and resources, including capital, to extract low-grade ore. The lower the grade, the greater the energy and resources needed. And then there's that little matter of break-even and, beyond that, profit. The price of gold is going to have to rise astronomically to make it worthwhile to go after a huge percentage of these low grade 'reserves'.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 04:13 | Link to Comment sumo
sumo's picture

But, but Jeff "There's no shortage" Christian said that mine production was going to "explode". Surely he wouldn't mislead us. Say it ain't so, Jeff!

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:01 | Link to Comment venturen
venturen's picture

Heard Bernanke was working on a plan to turn lead into gold...then he can make that along with the dollars!

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 00:43 | Link to Comment Amagnonx
Amagnonx's picture

Well, I make it 93,783t (metric) - at 31.1g/oz, 1,000,000 g/tonne.

 

Which is a hell of a lot of gold, however - much of that is not going to be recovered until the price is significantly higher - and if oil prices rise in tandem it may still not be economical to recover unless we start using an alternative energy source which is cheaper than oil.

 

Grades continue to fall - that is the killer - it determines where gold is not considered recoverable.  We have many tonnes of gold trapped in the waters of the oceans, but we will need very cheap energy to recover that.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 01:03 | Link to Comment atomicwasted
atomicwasted's picture

This is one of the reasons Canada will eventually have anschluss with the US, whether Canada wants it or not.

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:37 | Link to Comment unrulian
unrulian's picture

Absolute Certainty...It will be for...in decending order:

 

water

oil

food

gold

Bitchez

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 02:51 | Link to Comment AnAnonymous
AnAnonymous's picture

Ummm, are those visuals showing that gold is already allocated and owned/controlled by 'americans'?

If generalized, it could explain somehow the slowdown experienced by 'american' nations.

When thriving on stealth as 'americans', it turns quite hard to maintain the momentum when you own it all already.

Bad news for established 'americans'. The only people left in the world to be stolen from are themselves.

Swaying 'american' middle class better to brace for it, because it is coming.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 05:41 | Link to Comment TheFourthStooge-ing
TheFourthStooge-ing's picture

When thriving on filth as AnAnonymous 'hypocriticans', it turns quite hard to maintain the momentum when you have crapped on it all already.

Bad news for constipated AnAnonymous 'hypocriticans'. The only way left to blob up and pollute the world with non-sequiturds is overconsumption of Ex-Lax and Arby's Horsey Sauce themselves.

Braying AnAnonymous Chinese citizenism middle class (the emperor class) better squat down and brace for it, because shit is coming.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:19 | Link to Comment goldenbuddha454
goldenbuddha454's picture

Yes, alot of that gold is here, but because of the environ-mentalists, ownership of it and development of it (like our natural resources ie.. oil, natural gas, coal, keystone pipeline) by Americans will never come to fruition.  By the way, how is that Keystone Pipeline deal working out for Pennsylvanians?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 07:32 | Link to Comment chindit13
chindit13's picture

Interesting.  twenty ppm you say?  4x10^6 is considered a large deposit?  Okay.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 07:59 | Link to Comment goldenbuddha454
goldenbuddha454's picture

I know my eyes are bad, but do those charts seem a bit blurry, like a voting ledger coming from the U.S. Congress?  Top Ten Deposits by Grade seems  very small and unreadable like the 2500 pages in the ACA.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 08:17 | Link to Comment laomei
laomei's picture

"113.9 billion tonnes of in-situ gold on earth"

 

Well, not exactly. There 113.b tonnes of gold-containing rock.  That Pebble deposit is also basically never gonna be tapped for numerous reasons.  Probably the same for a bunch of em on that list.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 09:24 | Link to Comment Slartibartfast
Slartibartfast's picture

Canada should tax gold and silver extractors in the commodity itself and establish a virtually earthquake proof floor beneath the loonie that everyone will want a piece of. Instead, it buys and holds virtually no gold whatsoever. The moment we elect a government, they turn from 'Canadian' to 'Can't-nadian'. The country is resource-rich to the nth degree but somehow still can't manage to leverage that into a stronger economic position. Do you think there are certain forces in the world that don't want this?

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 09:50 | Link to Comment fleur de lis
fleur de lis's picture

A strong, independent, self-sufficient nation at peace and making its own policies on the basis of what best benefits its own citizenry is the last thing the NWO wants. So yes, it is true that there are certain forces in the world that don't wan't this, your big next-door neighbor to the south being one.

It should be remembered that both nations and citizens are controlled by the same "certain forces" who are too lazy and stupid to think and work but who survive by controlling entire nations and their resources through an elaborate scheme of lies and theft. 

The more all of us wake up to this the sooner we can rid ourselves of the governing lice who cover every inch of our lives.

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 13:07 | Link to Comment billsykes
billsykes's picture

Uh Where is china? Why is it left off the list? being that they have more gold than SA.

This chart is pretty pro canada- doesn't mention the economics- meaning most are low grade heap leach never never projects- where gold has to hit 5k before it is almost profitable.

One of the worst things you can do is invest in a gold mine- 10yrs plus to make revenue and 9-12m in drilling every year even still that time would be better spent purchasing bonds, or investing in O&G where 3 yrs is what it takes to produce.

If you got a couple grand go to vegas or pick a miner- pick yr' poison, as its just a stock play- no mines really make profit when you look at time + capital -revenue = profit (factoring in zero risk)

No go otherwise you would have the paper shufflers in there synthisising and LBO'ing. Its good for the insiders- they routienly pay themselves 400-650k+ a yr to make someone else drill a hole in the ground.

 

 

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 15:49 | Link to Comment Contra_Man
Contra_Man's picture

China has more unproven and probable Gold, Copper, Ore reserves than we're told or led to believe... as for the safest place to keep your gold if you had the most in the World? Just leave it in the ground...un-mined and under domestic foot.  Example stock: T.MUN

Fri, 11/30/2012 - 13:32 | Link to Comment miningman
miningman's picture

If it can't be grown...it must be mined.  Spent a couple seasons

working around Pebble and dozens of other prospects/mines.

Some of the creeks are so "polluted" naturally, they run blood

red to orange and that is a good thing for the oceans of the

planet.  Keeps them salty...like some of you bitches.  Hey, on

a long enough time scale...it all don't mean nothing.

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