Manufacturing ISM Plummets To Lowest Print Since July 2009

Tyler Durden's picture

So much for the 3rd Recovery (or is that 4th?) in the current depression: following the Chicago PMI which posted a solid beat on horrendous internals, today's Manufacturing ISM came in just as expected, at least by those skeptical of all the sugar high economic data the US population was spoon fed in the past few weeks. At 49.5, the headline PMI print was the lowest since July 2009, the biggest miss to expectations of 51.4 in 5 months, and down from 51.7. Also, as most know, as sub-50 print indicates a contraction in the manufacturing space, usually a precursor to overall recession. Particular data points of note: Employment down from 52.1 to 48.4; New Orders slide from 54.2 to 50.3, and in the worst news for GDP Exports declined, Imports rose and Inventories plunged - which was to be expected after a huge inventory build up in Q3 pushed GDP much higher in the period. Expect even more downward GDP recessions on today's ugly data. Finally, while the bulls would love to blame the collapse on Sandy, it was not mentioned anywhere in the release and the ISM's Holcome said just one respondent even mentioned Sandy in the release, which means the manufacturing reality will only get worse as the full impact of Sandy is internalized.

Lowest print since July 2009...

 

 

and lowest employment sub-index since Sept 2009...

 

The respondents are hardly optimistic about anything:

  • "Economy is very sluggish. Production is down and orders have slowed considerably from Q1." (Transportation Equipment)
  • "Conditions still appear to be positive for continued growth in sales." (Machinery)
  • "Business is steady, but not much more than that. We are in a lull." (Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products)
  • "The principle business conditions that will affect the company over the next three or four quarters will be the U.S. federal government tax and budgetary policies; the impact of those policies is not yet clear." (Petroleum & Coal Products)
  • "Differences between first half of year and remaining half are very dramatic, growing to a peak in the middle of the year with a gradual decline since." (Plastics & Rubber Products)
  • "Seeing a slowdown in request for quote activity." (Computer & Electronic Products)
  • "The fiscal cliff is the big worry right now. We will not look toward any type of expansion until this is addressed; if the program that is put in place is more taxes and big spending cuts — which will push us toward recession — forget it." (Fabricated Metal Products)
  • "Seeing a slowdown in demand across markets." (Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components)
  • "East Coast storms delayed some shipments." (Primary Metals)
  • "Global economic uncertainty still seems to be sticking around which is not necessarily making things worse, but it is also not making things better from a demand standpoint." (Chemical Products)

Source: ISM