Presenting The Fund-tastic Four: Ireland, Greece, Spain And... The U.S.

Tyler Durden's picture

Behold the fund-tastic four: Ireland, Greece, Spain and... the US? These are the four countries that in the past four years have accumulated the greatest deficit as a % of GDP (and yes, at just under 50%, the US is worse than Spain whose cumulative deficit has been over 40% of GDP), which in turn they have had to fund with what else: new debt.

The chart explains the scramble to force rates across the world to all time lows: a necessity to allow continued deficit funding, even if by doing so, the monetary authorities have made any economic growth impossible as true inflation (coupled with a rise in funding costs and government yields) is the last thing governments, locked in years more of deficit funding, can afford.

And while Europe is more or less toast due to a fixed currency, which means the only way it can grow its way out of the current mess which in turn would mean an internal devaluation resulting in 30-50% wage declines (as explained before), the US "can print its own currency" so as to preserve the myth that nominal wages are flat or rising. Of course, the concurrent external devaluation means the US will have to devalue the dollar (i.e., loss of purchasing power by those paid in USD). Relative to whom? Why Europe of course, which means the EUR will have to rise even more relative to the USD as the US "rebalances" its way out of its own deficit spending quicksand.

Alas, this takes us back to square one, as any external devaluation by the US would mean the internal devaluation in Europe will have to be even more profound, read even greater wage reductions, even greater social instability, and even greater cuts in the welfare spending. It also will mean even more and bigger bailouts in Europe, and a barage of endless lies and propaganda out of the unbearable Brussels-bsed circle of unelected Eurocrats.

Ah, the joy of closed loop Keynesian systems, in which one's gain is always someone else's loss...