40% Of Germans 40-49 Just Say "Nein" To Euro

Tyler Durden's picture

In news that is hardly welcome to Chancellor Merkel and her September reelection hopes, German Focus magazine revealed that a substantial 26% of all Germans would back a party that wants to quit the euro. Even more disturbing is that a whopping 40% of all Germans in the prime 40-49 age group are tired of supporting a failed monetary regime and will just say "nein" to the European globalist experiment at preserving the status quo if just given the opportunity. The Italian virus is spreading: the question is which "clown" will show up on the cover of the Economist in six short months, when at least one person will appear on the political scene to take advantage of the populist protest at endless German-backed bail outs, and what as Dylan Grice so eloquently explained earlier, is merely a reaction to central banker central planning manifesting itself in ongoing social breakdown.

From Reuters:

One in four Germans would be ready to vote in September's federal election for a party that wants to quit the euro, according to an opinion poll published on Monday that highlights German unease over the costs of the euro zone crisis.

 

Germany's mainstream parties remain solidly pro-euro despite grumbling over bailouts of countries such as Greece. A German taboo on nationalism, rooted in atonement for the crimes of the Nazi era, has helped to muffle eurosceptic voices.

 

But the poll conducted by TNS-Emnid for the weekly Focus magazine showed 26 percent of Germans would consider backing a party that wanted to take Germany out of the euro and as many as four in 10 Germans in the 40-49 age bracket would do so.

 

"This suggests there may be potential here for a new protest party," Emnid chief Klaus Peter Schoeppner told Focus.

 

The survey canvassed the views of a representative sample of 1,007 people on March 6-7.

Who will be the new German leader to appear from the ashes of populist anger? For now the answer is unclear:

A new eurosceptic movement called 'Alternative for Germany' (AfD) comprising mostly academics and business people is due to hold its first meeting later on Monday in a northern suburb of Frankfurt.

 

One of its founders, economics professor Bernd Lucke, told Focus he had no concern that it would be able to raise the required 2,000 signatures in each German region to take part in September's federal election.

 

AfD's website www.alternativefuer.de has been live since late last week and its Twitter account (@wahlalternativ1) counts 690 followers.

 

"Let's put an end to this euro!" is the message on the front page of its website.

 

"The Federal Republic of Germany is in the deepest crisis in its history. The introduction of the euro was a fatal mistake that is threatening our prosperity. The old parties are grizzled and worn out. They are stubbornly refusing to admit their mistake and correct it," it said.

And while it is unknown if Bernd Lucke or any of his peers will be the new "face" of German populist anger, one thing is certain: in Germany someone always appears in key historic moments to provide the angry masses just the conduit they desire. Whether it will also lead to preserving the European peace, the European welfare state, and preserving a banker oligarchy-enriching status quo, that we sadly can not say.