The Great British Cash EUxodus Begins

Tyler Durden's picture

UK's deVere advisory group reports, "more and more expats in Spain, Italy, Portugal and Greece are now not unreasonably worried for their deposits in these countries," and are seeing a "surge" in the number of British expats seeking advice about moving funds out of eurozone's most troubled economies. As EUBusiness reports, "Whether the institutions like it and accept it or not, there is a real risk of a major deposit flight from these countries as people feel their accounts could be plundered next." It is hardly surprising obviously (as we noted earlier the bid in German bunds) but we fear this escalation in cash exodus from the periphery will increase the need for a broader EU capital control scheme sooner rather than later.

Via EUBusiness,

Independent financial advisory company deVere Group on Tuesday reported a "surge" in the number of British expats seeking advice about moving funds out of some of the eurozone's most troubled economies following the Cyprus bailout deal.

 

According to deVere Group chief executive Nigel Green, "more and more expats in Spain, Italy, Portugal and Greece are now not unreasonably worried for their deposits in these countries."

 

He added: "Over the last week, since the messy deal to bailout Cypriot banks began, our financial advisers in these areas have reported a significant surge in enquiries from expats who are looking to safeguard their funds in other jurisdictions which are perceived to be safer.

 

"Whether the institutions like it and accept it or not, there is a real risk of a major deposit flight from these countries as people feel their accounts could be plundered next."

 

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Jeroen Dijsselbloem, who heads the Eurogroup of finance ministers, said the costs of bank recapitalisations should not fall on tax payers, but on bondholders, shareholders and, if necessary, uninsured deposit holders.

 

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