Bart Chilton To Commodities Traders: You Are On Your Own

Tyler Durden's picture

While the government is by and large shut down, the various market "regulators" have been quite vocal in reiterating that they will stay open. After all - in a world in which the capital markets are the only policy (not to mention confidence boosting) vehicle left, one can't have a situation in which mom and pop investors lose faith in "free, efficient and unbroken markets" and stay out. The SEC went so far as to post the following announcement on its site: "The SEC will remain open and operational in the event the federal government undergoes a lapse in appropriations on October 1."

However, this appears to be the case only for stocks.

For commodities, such as gold and silver which both got pummeled around the usual time of the London fixing as reported previously, it is a different matter entirely. Bart Chilton, in this email exchange with a reader, explains why investors in non-stock instruments are as of this moment, largely on their own.

From: Chilton, Bart <BChilton@cftc.gov>
Date: Tue, Oct 1, 2013 at 9:32 AM
Subject: Re: Today's Smackdown
To: XXX@XXX

 

No regulators looking at markets due to government shut down.

 

B

 

NOTE: Ponzimonium: How Scam Artists are Ripping Off America, is now available in a FREE EBOOK edition. Go to the link for your copy and a Government Book Talk interview: http://govbooktalk.gpo.gov/2013/09/03/post-ponzimonium-an-interview-from-the-front-lines/

* * * 

 

From: XXX@XXX
Sent: Tuesday, October 01, 2013 09:16 AM Eastern Standard Time
To: Chilton, Bart
Subject: Today's Smackdown
 
Commissioner Chilton,

 

Any comment on this morning's shenanagins in the gold and silver pits?  Time to reopen an investigation?
Is credibility important to the CFTC?

 

Regards,

 

XXX

Well, the government may be down, but at least Bart is willing to soldier on and since he is deemed "essential", is kind enough to not only reply to emails but also to recommend his recently published book, titled appropriately, Ponzimonium. As for the rhetorical question of how important credibility is to the CFTC, we are confident it is just that: rhetorical.